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CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL
Oldest
Bona Fide
AFL
Newspaper
in
North Carolina
VOL. XVIII ; NO. 48
CHARLOTTE. N.C.. THURSDAY. APRIL 21. 1949
Subscription Price $2.90 Year
VOTE IN PRIMARY MONDAY MAY BE HEAVY
Over 30,000 Registered
And Qualified To Vote
NUMBER OF CANDIDATES FOR CITY COUNCIL THE
LARGEST IN MANY YEARS—CAMPAIGN SPARRING
IN RACE FOR MAYOR SPIRITED.
Perhaps the heaviest vote since pre-war days will be cast
in Charlotte Monday, April 25, when the electorate goes to
the polls to select a Mayor, a City Council, composed of
seven members, and two members of the School Board. The
number of entrants in the council race is thirty-six and
three are campaigning for the position of mayor, now held
by Herbert H. Baxter. Mr. Baxter is running to succeed
himself, and is opposed by Victor Shaw and Manley R. Dun
away.
The mayor’s race campaigning has been lively. Mr. Bax
ter and Mr. Shaw have been hurling political rocks at each
other at a lively gait during the last several days, and an
occasional brick of the political variety has been tossed into
the affray by Mr. Dunaway.
MR. SHAW’S VIEWS
1. “I want Charlotte to be a
clean city and to make it so re
quires positive, forthright, and
direct action toward the elimina
tion of every slum or slum sec
tion in this city.
2. "Rent control must be con
tinued and low cost housing proj
ects should be fostered until ev
ery honest man or woman in this
city shall have decent living quar
ters.
3. "... No act within the
power of the governing board
should be left undone to improve
health conditions.
4. “Whatever it takes, and let
it cost what it will, the tragedy
of crime must be abated; and to
this end the present efficient po
lice force should be augmented
and supplied with the necessary
funds to effect this purpose.
5. “ . . . Many streets in this
city should be opened up and
widened and many grade cross
ings should be eliminated.
“These things I favor, and for
these things, if elected mayor, I
will fight and will not quit fight
ing."
MR. BAXTER’S PLATFORM
The following platform has
been in circulation since the be
ginning of Mr. Baxter’s campaign
to succeed himself:
1. “To operate a balanced
budget containing the necessary
appropriations for the health,
welfare, and protection of all cit
(Continued On Page 4)
The Candidates
The following are the names of the persons as they
are to appear on the ballot in the primary of the
City of Charlotte to be held April 25, 1949, as candi
dates for Mayor. Councilman, and Members of the
School Board:
FOR MAYOR
H. H. BAXTER
MANLEY R. DUNAWAY
VICTOR SHAW
FOR COUNCILMEN
J. WALTER ADAMS
G. DOUGLAS AITKEN
CLAUDE L. ALBEA
BASIL M. BOYD
KENNETH M. CLONTZ
WILLIAM I. CODDINGTON
SIDNEY F. CROFT
BISHOP DALE
JAMES F. DAUGHTRY
GEORGE F. FAILLE
EARL G. FOUSHEE
JOSEPH M. FRAYLON
PAUL FUNDERBURKE
LLEWELLYN H. GRIFFITH
W. CARL HIPP
HUGHES B. HOYLE, JR.
SANDY R. JORDAN
FAISON S. KUESTER
LOUIS E. LAMKIN
LAURENCE E. McBRAYER
WM. C. McINTIRE
WOODROW W. MOORE
JOE MURNICK
JOHN M. PAINTER
M. D. PERRY
EARL L. ROBARDS
JOE S. ROBINSON
TOM S. ROGERS
J. HERMAN SAXON
T. M. SHELTON
GEORGE H. SKINNER
ALONZO G. SQUIRES
D. C. STATON
GUS THEVAOS
EMMETT M. WILKINSON
PARKS A. YANDLE
FOR MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL BOARD
FRANK 0. ROBERTS
HOYT W. SHORE
HERBERT SPAUGH
"What's good for you is bod for you •
The Gop-Byrds loudly criod.
"Tho tfdwflo you voted us to do
Wo. Haven't won triad.
"Toft-Hartley Low? We fiflht repeat.
And schools? They need no aid.
The Nation's health, the housing deal?
H it's up to us, they're dakir
:-v>
<tO*»T«OVV
5 TO >
KVtUVTHlM
ELECTION SLATED MAY 2
FOR WBT UNION WORKERS
An election has been railed
for May 2 at the Wilder build*
j ing offices of Jefferson Stand*
■ ard Broadcasting company to
' determine whether I.oral 1229,
i International Brotherhood of
; Electrical Worker*.< AFL, shall
be named by the National La
bor Relations board a* the of
ficial bargaining unit for cer
tain technical employes of the
company.
The election was railed by
the Fifth regional suboffice of
the labor board at Winston-Sa
lem. The decision to call the
election came after a hearing
by the board.
_
WELFARE PLAN BACKED
BY PRESIDENT GREEN
WASHINGTON.—AFL Presi
dent William Green this week
endorsed the Administration’s
plan for broadening Social Se
curity coverage and boosting ben
efit payments.
He told the House Ways ft
Means Committee the program is
like one the American Federation
of Labor has backed for many
years.
“This is the year of decision,”
he said in a prepared statement.
“The measure before you offers
the opportunity to provide not
only insurance for individual
workers, but in our considered
judgment presents a program
: that will to a large degreee in
1 sure the future stability of our
1 national economy.”
Greeen recommends that Social
Security coverage ^e extended to
the self-employed, farm workers,
domestics, employees of State and
their political subdivisions, and
persons working for non-profit
and charitable institutions.
“A common base of protection
through social insurance for all
gainfully occupied citixens is, in
the puolic interest,” he said.
MINE DEATH TOLL HIGH
DESPITE BETTER ’49 RECORD
WASHINGTON.—The Federal
Bureau of Mines said that the
rate of deaths and injuries in
coal mines last year was the
lowest on record, except for 1944
and 1945. The combined fatal
and non-fata! injury rate was
63.46, a 1,000,000 man-hours of
exposure to hazards, as compared
with 63.62 for 1947 and 63.35 for
1946. The bureau said that 1.019
miners were killed and 54,045 in
jured last year.
THIS ILL WIND BLOWS NO GOOD!
FILIBUSTERS MUST GO
la the last election* we, the people of the United States
expressed our will in no uncertain terms.
We went on record in favor of legislation to provide
more adequate housing and tighter rent controls.
We wanted a broader social security program.
We voted to repeal the Toft-Hartley Act.
We gave a mandate for federal aid to education so that
our boys and girls wouldn’t be taught by underpaid teach
ers in overcrowded schools.
Above all, we expressed ourselves in favor of a civil
rights program that would assure equal opportunity for
jobs, housing and education to all Americans.
This was the will of the people.
Now we are faced with a shameful spectacle. The Sena
tors who oppose these measures have resorted to parlia
mentary maneuvers to shut off any discussion of the
real issues.
They can still employ this filibuster so that consideration
of needed legislation may never come to the Senate floor.
The citizens of the United States must answer these ob
structionists. We must insist that the power to filibuster be
broken. The wheels of democracy must not be jammed by
the endless talk of a few Senators. •
American labor did not throw out the do-nothing 80th
Congress to get a do-nothing 81st. We wanted action then,
and we wont it now. The power to filibuster must be
ended. It stands in thejvay of progress.
Primary Election
Monday, April 25th
United Political Action
Committee Sends List Of
Questions To Candidates
AFL-CIO COMMITTEE HEADED BY JAMES If. FUL
LERTON, CIO. AND STERLING L. HICKS. AFL.,
WHO SEEK CANDIDATES VIEWS FOR LABOR.
A 14-point questionnaire was sent to each of the candi
dates seek in* Charlotte City offices last week with the re
quest that the queries be answered and returned to the
committee not later than Wednesday. April 20. The commit
tee considers that the questions asked are of vital interest
to all citizens of Charlotte, which includes thousands of
members of organized labor.
The replies received by the committee will be the basis ot
the committee’s appraisal of candidates, who will be recom
mended for the support of organized labor in the primary
election Mondav. Anril 25.
The fourteen questions set
forth in the quest'onnaire follow:
1‘. Will you vote for bond elec
tion if necessary, for the follow
ing proposed improvements: wa
ter extension $075,000; sewer ex
pansion, $1,000,000; streets, $1,
000,000; off - street parking,
$1,500,000; police addition, $200,
000; fire alarm system $200000;
recreation, $2,500,000. Will you
support these even if it means a
tax increase?
2. Since Governor Scott ha*
stated publicly that he believes
rent control should be left to the
various communities of the state,
would you vote to continue rent
control for the present?
3. Will yov rote for the slum
Clearance pfogthnn? Do you tn*
tend to see {hat it continues?
4. Will you vote for getting
Federal aid for housing projects
in Charlotte?
5. Will you vote for issuing rev
enue bonds for a municipal audi
torium, costing $1,500,000?
6. Will you vote to continue the
present plan of admitting news
paper representatives to all meet
ings and conferences at City Hall,
open or closed?
7. On the question of industrial
waste npw being unloaded into
Sugaw Creek, will you vote to
definitely require the companies
to treat the waste so that it can
[ If carried off in the sewer sys
| tem?
8. Will you vote for the con
tinuation of a smoke abatement
engineer and measures needed to
make this work effective?
8. Will you vote for addition to
the curriculum of Negro schools,
particularly in the line of com
mercial and industrial courses?
10. Will you vote to have Ne
groes represented on the policy
making bodies of the City gov
ernment, such as the Park &
Recreation Commission, etc?
11. Will you vote for the pro
posed allotment of funds for va
rious parks and playgrounds as
outlined by t}& Paj& & Recre
■='- *
12. Will you introduce and vote
for (A) the passage of an ordi
nance or law, which would re
quire the purchases of enough
new motor equipment to add to
the present motor equipment
which would bring the service of
the Fire, Police, Sanitary, Street
and Water departments to a
point sufficient to provide good
service for the entire population
of Charlotte, (B) the increase in
personnel required to operate
such equipment sufficiently, (C)
increase the personnel of the City
Fire Department to the point
(Continued On Page 4)
VOTING PLACES
CITY PRIMARY. APRIL 25. 1919
CITY ELECTION. MAY 3, 1949
Following is a list of the Voting Precincts and their
locations, as furnished The Labor Journal by the office
of Elections Chairman Brenizer:
Precinct 1—Court House
Precinct 2—501 S. Alexander St.
Precinct 3—401 East 9th St.
Precinct 4—1600 N. Brevard St.
Precinct 5—601 North Graham St.
Precinct 6—329 Irwin Ave.
Precinct 7—825 Westbrook Drive
Precinct 8—2000 North Allen St.
Precinct tt_Y. M. C. A., E. 36th St.
Precinct 10—3501 Plaza Rond
Precinct 11—1620 Club Road
Precinct 12—Midwood School, Central Ave.
Precinct 13—1400 Louise Ave.
Precinct 14—1241 East 10th St.
Precinct 15—537 Lamar Ave.
Precinct 16—2539 Westmoreland Ave.
Precinct 17—1028 Waterman Ave.
Precinct 16—2701 East Seventh St.
Precinct 19—Mint Museum. Eastover
Precinct 20—500 Cherokee Rond
Precinct 21—111 Barnett Place. Off 1800 E. 4th St.
Precinct 22—2108 Vail Ave.
Precinct 23—1601 Park Drive
Precinct 24—2131 Radcliffe Ave.
Precinct 25—1026 Providence Road
Precinct 26—Myers Park Club, Myers Park
Precinct 27—Avondale Com. House, Avondale & Lilac
Precinct 28—1612 Kenilworth Ave>.
Precinct 29—Dilworth School, 405 E. Park Ave.
Precinct 30—1716 Lyndhurst Ave.
Precinct 31—1927 Dilworth RdM W.
Precinct 32—1004 Poindexter Drive
Precinct 33—Wibnore School, 428 West Boulevard
Precinct 34—Alexander Graham Jr. High School
Precinct 35—Wesley Hts. School. 128 S. Summit Ave.
Precinct 35—8eversvilte School, 1701 Sumter Ave.
Precinct 38—2436 WUdnoou Bird.
Precinct 39—West Charlotte High School
Precinct 40—Fairview Homan, 1026 Oaklawa Ave.
Precinct 41—Hutchison School, 1400 Hutchison Ave.
Precinct 42—1607 Statesville Ave.
(Additional Data On Page 3)
    

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