North Carolina Newspapers

    Editorial
THE CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
Published at Charlotte. North Carolina _
H. A. Stalls, Editor and Publisher W. M. Witter, Aaaociate Editor
Entered as second-class mail matter September II, 1931, at the
iPost Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of
March 3, 1879. - __
Oldest Bona Fide AFL Newspaper in North Carolina, consistently
serving the American Federation of Labor and its members since it
was founded. May 12, 1931. Approved by the American Federation
of Labor in 1931.
Endorsed by Charlotte Typographical Union, Number 338, An Af
filiate of Charlotte Central Labor Union and the North Carolina Fed
eration of Labor. __
News Services: American Federat on of Labor, U. S. and North
Carolina Department* of Labor, and Southern Labor Pres* Associa
tion.
MEMBER SOUTHERN LABOR PRESS ASSOCIATION
-LET THE SUNLIGHT
OF A
► FREE PRESS
SHINE IN HARK PLACES”
SOUTHERN LABOR PRESS ASSOCIATION
WEEKLY BIBLE THOUGHT
“Whosoever therefore shall confess me before
men, him will I confess also before my Father
which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me
before men, him will I also deny before my Father
which is in heaven."
St. Matthew.
* THE PRIMARY ELECTION IS UPON US
Charlotte voters are faced with one of the largest and
most exceptional tickets ever placed before them. There
are two ‘•blocs’* and many "free lance” candidates pining
to serve in positions of public trust w'hich pay practically
nothing, all of which makes us feel proud of our patriotic
citizenship.
Candidate for Mayor Herbert Baxter points to his past
record with pride, Then there is Victor Shaw, an exem
plary citiztft) with 3* hr°ad vision and an earnest desire to
put a “neW broom” at work cleaning the City Hall and
doing even greater things; with Manley R. Dunaway hav
ing ideas of his own which he feels would prove a panacea
for all of our ills.
But as the voter glances at our Councilmanic Ticket, it i
makes him ponder. A galaxy of candidates representing
all walks of life are spread before him for selection. Some
are for this, some are for that, while some are for any
thing that will put Charlotte to the forefront.
Various “Clubs” and “bunches” have held meetings to
“sweat out” the Candidates, and the result has not
amounted to much except to befuddle the public and the
candidates. The Charlotte Observer has come out forth
right and in the open for Herbert Baxter, while the Char
lotte News has declared the candidates for Mayor all “hon
orable men” and remained in the “middle of the road.”
There are 30,714 names upon the new registration books
in 42 voting precincts and it is safe to say that there will
be at least 25,000 votes cast in the primary, Monday,
April 25.
There is not much chance of a run-off for Mayor unless
the vote received by Candidates Baxter and Shaw is so
close that the vote received by Mr. Dunaway will throw
them into a second contest.
On Monday night the Charlotte League of Women Voters
"jammed the court room at the County Court House with
over 400 voters, many standing, at which time the three
candidates for Mayor and 21 of the 36 Council aspirants
were present and one of the four candidates for the School
Board was on hand. They were quizzed as to their stancf
upon many matters, and their answers seemed to be ap
propriate and diplomatic.
It is estimated that 4,000 Negro voters are registered,
out of an estimated 15,000 entitled to vote. Leaders state
that this number will increase as new registration periods
came around, and even the number now registered can
carry weight in election results.
The merits and demerits of the various candidates have
been set forth by the “friends” and “enemiel” of each
candidate to great extent, and The Labor Journal does not
think it necessary to take them up. So, Gentle Reader, we
are spreading the Menu before you, on the front page—
TAKE YOUR CHOICE!
VOTE FOR
Louis E. Lamkin
FOR
City Council
Louis R Lankin
Proper Municipal Government . . . Park and Recreational Facil
•tie* . . . Piayfronnda . .. Parkin* Problem Solved . . . Perimeter
Aren Consideration . . ProRroaa!
Primary Monday, April 25—Election Tuesday, May 3
—Paid Political Adv.
Fling's Finish
A newspaper named Fling
yftuld make “copy” from any old
thing,
But the copy he wrote
yf a five-dollar note
Was so good he is now in Sing
Sing.
Nat 8a High
Mrs. Henpeck: “Everything is
going up.”
Mr. Henpeck: “Oh, I wouldn't
say that. For instance, there’s
your opinion of me, my opinion
of you, and the neighbors’ opinion j
of us both.”
Some of The Things We
Lend Money on
l)l»wii»<»
Watrke#
Mn> Clothing
T (Hl|>
Silrerware
8k«t Com
Rifle#
Piatola
T rook*
Adding Mark!
Bnen
Sait Ca
Mtiairal ln«i runrtli
Kodak#
Typewriter#
AM RuHinetm Strictly Confidential. When in Need
of Money We Never Fail You.
dee a* for bargain in diamond#, watche*. Jewelry, rlotking. etc.
RELIABLE LOAN CO.
2*1 EAST TRADE STREET
So Y ou’re
Going To
VOTE!
THE RIGHT TO VOTE — TO VOTE IN SECRET
AND TO HAVE YOlTR VOTE COUNT — IS A GREAT
RIGHT.
IF ELECTED I WILL DO MY BEST TO REPRE
SENT YOU AND BE YOUR VOICE IN OUR CITY
COUNCIL.
FAISON S. KDESTER
^ —Paid Political Advertisement.
New tad Rccoaditkmcd
PIANOS
For the boot raise la NEW or
reconditioned piano*, oeloet
youi from oar stock of nearly
100 instruments. Setinway. •
Mathushek, Winter. Howard. |
and many others. Prices to
suit everyone.
ANDREWS MUSIC CO.
“Oar 5Sth Tear'*
“Steiaway Headqoarters"
SSI North Tryon Street
START
a
ScUM+Uj i
/Jcaut+xli
NOW
THE COMMERCIAL
NATIONAL BANK
Charlotte, N. C.
Subscription price $2 a year
109 SOUTH
MMMMMMMMWWMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
CRfATORSOF
Proudly w# fnmt tW CS
ROOSTER • the mw mMm at
Colonial Stores.
The CS Rooator ia a aew way
of identifying Big Star a ad Little
Star Stores, and shoes sB — A
MARK OF QUALITY FOODS.
Joia the Lhouasads shopping
under the sign of tks C8 BOOST*
ER today — you’ll ba glad that
yos did!
COLONIAL STORES.
» INCORPORATED •
Fresh Cop
Taffic Cop: “Listen, lady didn't
rou hear my whistle?”
Young Thing: “Yes, but you’re
vasting your time; I’m engaged.”
Numbered
Ardent Male: “I’d love to be
married to you some day!”
Screen Star: “All right, III
put you on my wedding list.”
Martin’s Department Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
Shop id WLcudtin and $ao*
SHOES—CLOTHING—FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
AT CORNER TRADE AND COLLEGE
DEBATE ON T-H REPEAL
SET TO BEGIN APRIL 2S
WASHINGTON—The House of
Representatives is scheduled to
begin debate on the administra
tion’s Taft-Hartley law repeal
measure immediately after the
Easter recess of Congress which
terminates on April 26.
The date for consideration of
the Lesinski kill was set tenta
tively after the Rules Commit
tee sent the kill to the House un
der an “open” rule permitting
amendments from the floor. This
action was contrary to the re
quested “closed” rule sought by
Representative John Lesinski,
chairman of the House Labor
committee.
Under a “closed” rule members
of the House would have been
forced to vote for or against the
Lesinski bill without amendments
except those approved by the
Labor Committee.
DON’T FORGET THE CHURCH
In these days of stress and storm,
Bringing clouds in ugly form;
W’hen the night replaces day,
And your friends are far away,
Don't forget the Church.
When the sun does not come up,
And you drink grief’s full cup;
When your riven heart is sad,
And the world seems only bad,
Don’t forget the Church.
When the blue sky turns to gray.
And you’ve lost the narrow
way;
When there’s fog and misty rain,
And the loss outweighs the
K*in,
Don't forget the Church.
When your eyes stream salty
tears.
And your heart is full of fears;
When you’re groping in the dark,
Hearing not the singing lark.
Don’t forget the Church.
When you’re busy with the cares
Of this world and its vain
wares;
Whe|i confronted by gross sin.
And temptation's gilded tin,
Don’t1 forget the Church.
When your critics scoff and flout,
When you're losing in the fight.
And it seems you’re down and
out;
And you fear approaching
night, f
Don’t forget the Church.
—Pilgrim Holiness Advocate.
M
FOR MAYOR
Vote To Re-Elect
R H. BAXTER
I
MY PLATFORM
1. To operate a balanced budget containing the nec
essary appropriations for the health, welfare, and
protection of all citizens.
i
I 2. To hold taxes on your home and other real estate
at a minimum.
3. To further develop and expand our industrial life,
thereby providing more jobs for all citizens.
4. To expedite the solution of traffic congestion.
5. To further expand our recreational program.
6. To continue efforts for our new Civic Center and
Library.
7. To develop our health servive program.
8. To continue to negotiate with the Southern Rail
way Company for a new station and for the elimi
nation of grade crossings.
Proved ... Experience,
PRIMARY; Monday, April 25,1949
Ability, Aggressiveness
ELECTION: Tuesday, May 3,1949
—Paid Political Adrartia——I.
    

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