North Carolina Newspapers

    ANNIVERSARY GREETINGS
STOWE MERCANTILE COMPANY
No. C North Main Street
Telephone 321
BELMe$Tt N. C.
ANNIVERSARY GREETINGS
ORANGE CRUSH AND DOUBLE COLA BOTTLING CD.
TekflMNw 5-1131
GASTONIA, N. C.
ANNIVERSARY GREETINGS
CITY COACH COMPANY, ING.
R. R. Rhyne, Manager
—Operating Gastonia to—
Rex—Ranlo—Spencer Mountain—Lowell—Art-Cloth
McAdenville—Eagle Mill—Belmont—E. Belmont
North Belmont — Mt. Holly
156 W. Airline Are. Telephone 5-0511
GASTONIA, N. C.
Aaalwrsaiy Breetligs
J. R. KAYLOR
6ENERAL CONTRACTOR
ROUTE NO. 1
6astMla, H. C.
Newspaper Ads
A Century Ago
By ROBERT ft. BARTHOLOMEW
Chapel Hill.—Many of the pres
ent-day newspaper readers fret as
much pleasure from reading the
advertisements as they do from the
news or sports sections of the pa
pers. If today’s readers had a
chance to read the advertisements
that ran in the North Carolina
newspapers of a century ago, they
would find them not only amusing
but highly educational.
Newspaper advertising not only
shows what people want to buy
and sell but it gives a clear picture
of the general economic and so
cial conditions of the period.
A survey made of several North
Carolina papers, dated 1849, shows
that the advertising profession has
made great progress from a tech
nical standpoint and that the ad
vertisers of today have also chang
ed their products and services as
well as the method of offering
them to the public.
No Full-Page Spreads
The first thing that one notices
about the advertising of a century
ago is that there are no full-page
spreads. Most ads are confined to
a column and are from two to three
inches deep. A two-column ad 10
inches deep was rarely ever found,
but a few patent medicine firms
did use this much space.
Practically all advertisements,
were set in the same tise type with
which the news matter was printed
They generally had a heading with
regular news-sise type. Photo
graphs were not used but an oc
casional drawing of a products
might be shown.
Many of the ads were for pro
ducts and services that have been
obsolete for years. Some of the
papers carried advertising for lot
teries, the first prise being $40,
000. Tickets for this lottery sold
for $10.
There were also reward notices
for fugitive slaves. Such rewards
ranged from $6 to $100, depending
on the value of the slave.
Steamship Liaea
A century ago, steamship lines
were operating on the Cape Fear
river between Fayetteville and Wil
mington. Passage for one way was
advertised for $3 and freight rates
also were quoted. There was alee
a steamship line that was advertis
ing out of Wilmington for passen
gers for a “direct trip to Califor
nia.”
Several advertisers listed car
riages and other types of horse
drawn vehicles. One firm offered
a new type shower bath that would
wash the body but would not wet
the bead of the bather. An ice com
pany offered to ship ice from Wil
mington to customers along the
Cape Fear and pointed out that it
would be "carefully packed and
promptly forwarded.”
Officers of the law also ran ads
a century ago. One North Carolina
sheriff advertised for an escaped
counterfeiter who had been manu
facturing North Carolina bank
bills. When the counterfeiter es
raped, he also stole his counterfeit
bills back from the sheriff.
Front Fago Advertising
Many of the papers carried ad
vertising on the front page which
is a custom that is followed today
in some parts of the world. The
front page of many of the papers
were usually divided between ad
vertising matter and news matter.
Good businessmen of a century
ago acted just as they do today.
When a great crowd of visitors
was expected to be in town, they
ran ads for the benefit of the visit
ors. One merchant in Raleigh was
looking forward to the meeting of
the Legislature and ran the follow
ing advertisement:
“Should the gentlemen of the ap
proaching Legislature want any
good old Liquors, we will be pleas
ed to furnish them. Jugs, Decant
ers, and Tumblers also loaned.”
Patent medicine advertising took
more space in the papers than any
other product. Prices on such med
icines ranged from 10 cents to $3
per bottle. These products were
supposed to cure anything from
an ingrown toenail to the most
serious diseases known to the med
ical profession. Nearly all of them
were guaranteed to give satisfac
tion. One such guarantee ran as
follows:
“I will guarantee my medicine to
relieve pain in two or three hours
and will cure in two or three days.
At all druggists, 25 cents a vial.”
Prices Were Lew
The present high cost of living
would make the merchant of a cen
tury ago look like a fairy god
mother. Flour sold for two cents
per pound, lard for seven cents a
pound. Twenty-five cents would
buy two pounds of bacon, and a
dollar would buy 200 pounds of
white potatoes. Molasses was 25
cents a gallon, and salt pork went
begging at five <?nts a pound.
The'whiskey dealer of a century
ago was as active in advertising as
he is today. Corn whiskey was ad
vertised at 25 cents a gallon, apple
brandy for 35 cents a gallon and
peach brandy for 40 cents.
Educational institutes of 1849 also
saw the benefits to be had from
advertising. Among the many that
used the columns of the North Ca
rolina papers was the Catawba In
stitute. The ads informed the public
that the school charged a dollar a
month for tuition for students
studying the three R’s, and up to
$2.40 a month for those studying
Greek and Latin. Parents of pros
pective students were further as
sured that “Boarding can be had
in respectable. families including
room rent, candles, washing, and
fuel from $6 to $6 per month.”
The State of North Carolina has
made much progress in all fields in
the last 100 years. It is easy for
any newspaper reader to see that
the gentlemen of the press who
handle advertising have not been
left behind.—Charlotte Observer.
Tobacco Workers
Termed o Left
Wing Outfit
Washington, May 6.—A govern
ment agency said yesterday it is
too much to believe a lawyer made
two free trips from Washington to
North Carolina for a client.
That was a major reason given
for a 3 to 2 National Labor Re
lations board decision that a left
wing CIO union was trying to
evade the non-communist 'affidavit
requirement to win bargaining
rights for 1,225 Greensboro, N. C-,
tobacco drying workers.
The majority held the newly
formed United Tobacco Workers
was only a “front” for the left
wing CIO food, tobacco and agri
cultural workers union in organis
ing efforts at the R. J. Reynolds
Tobacco company.
Officers of the new union had
filed the non-communist oaths re
quired for access to NLRB proced
ures while officers of the latter
group had refused to file them. The
Food and Tobacco Workers union
is headed by Donald Henderson,
who has just returned from a
Communist sponsored “peace” con
ference in Paris.
Part of the testimony in the case
was that the United Tobacco work
ers was without funds yet obtained
services of a Washington lawyer
for two proceedings in North Ca
rolina.
PAID Holidays are becoming_
New York City.—The National
Industrial Conference Board found
in a survey that in 1936 fewer than
10 per cent of the companies
checked were paying hourly rated
employes for one or more unworked
holidays, but in 1948, 76.6 per cent
of the firms allowed this practice.
JENKINS METAL SHOP
"* CiNm MM SfcMt Mitii Wwfc
GASTONIa/n. c •
Write Today for New Service Folder
Anniversary Greetings
J. E. SIRRINE CO.
Engineers
Greenville, S. C.
IRO REPORTS ARRIVAL
IN U. S. OF 20.9MTH DP
New York.—Blonde, 5-year-old
Janina Vaitkevieius, who arrived
aboard the army transport General
Harry Taylor with her parents, 2
brothers and 875 other displaded
persons, is the 20,000th D. P. to
reach this country under the Dis
placed Persons Act of J948, K was
revealed by the International Ref
ugee Organization.
Journal 1 year only $2.00
ANNIVERSARY GREETINGS
, MIL ANO MARINE ELECTRIC, IRC.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
WIRING — LIGHTING —'REPAIRING
\
137 So. Marietta Telephone 5*1311
I
%
GASTONIA, N. C.
L
Aiitarsary Greetings
P. T. Withers
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Gastonia, N. C.
Auimsary Mies
Carter Traveler Co.
DIVISION OF
A. B. CARTER, IRC.
6astoiia, R. C.
Anniversary Greetings
*
GROCERS BAKING COMPANY
6nMa,I.C.
I
IN
    

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