North Carolina Newspapers

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Editorial
THE CHARLOTTE LABOR JOURNAL
AND DIXIE FARM NEWS
Published at Charlotte, North Carolina
OLDEST LABOR PUBLICATION IN THE TWO CAROLINAS
H. A. Stalls, Editor and Publiaher W. M. Witter, Associate Editor
R. G. Thomas, Greensboro . .— Field Representative
Entered as second-class mail matter September 11, 1931, at the
■Post Office at Charlotte, N. C., under the Act of Congress of
March 3, 1879.
Oldest Bona Fide AFL Newspaper in North Carolina, consistently
serving the American Federation of Labor and its members since it
was founded. May 12, 1931. Approved by the American Federation
ef Labor in 1931.
Endorsed by Charlotte Typographical Union, Number 338, An Af
filiate of Charlotte Central Labor Union and the North Carolina Fed
eration of tabor.
News Services: American Federation of Labor, U. S. and North
Carolina Departments of Labor, and Southern Labor Press Associa
tion.
The Labor Journal will not be responsible for the opinions of cor
respondents, but any erroneous reflection upon the character, stand
ing or reputation of any person, firm or corporation which may ap
pear in the columns of The Labor Journal will be corrected when
called to the attention of the pub'isher. Correspondence and Open
Forum opinions solicited, but The Journal reserves the right to reject
objectionable reading matter and advertising at all times.
"LET THE SUNLIGHT
OF A
FREE PRESS
SHINE IN DARK PLACES"
SOUTHERN LABOR PRESS ASSOCIATION
MEMBER SOUTHERN LABOR PRESS ASSOCIATION
~ 2 ~
~ WEEKLY BIBLE THOUGHT
“Come unto Me, all ye that labor and are heavy
laden, and I will Rive you rest. Take My yoke
upon you, and learn of Me: for I am meek and
lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your
souk. For My yoke is easy, and my burden is
light.”—Matthew 11:28-30.
. HOME OWNERSHIP STUDY REVEALS PLIGHT OF
MILLIONS OF MIDDLE-INCOME FAMILIES
Less than half of the families in the nation with in
comes below $4,000 annually own their own homes, ac
cording to a recent survey made by the Federal Reserve
Board.
This was one of the highlights of the study which
showed that some 20,000,000 non-farm families in the|
United States were home owners at the beginning of 1949,
an increase of almost 2,000,000 in one year.
The board said that the proportion of families owning
their own homes increased gradually above the $4,000 in
come level. About 7 but of 10 families with incomes of I
$7,600 or more reported that they were in the home-owning
class.
The information contained in the survey is fapsed on the
results of bout 3,800 interviews taken in 66 sampling
points in the country.
Less than 18,000,000 families are paying rent, according
to the survey, and about 2,000,000 neither own homes nor I
pay rent. Approximately 61 per cent of all nonfarm fami
lies own their homes, the Reserve Board said, and one-halt I
of these homes were valued by their owners at more than
$8,000.
The Reserve Board said that the 2,000,000 families that'
Neither owned a home nor rented one included families
living in trailers, single-person families who have rent-free
quarters connected with their work, and young married
couples who live with the parents of either the husband
or the wife.
The Reserve Board also found that of every 10 houses
that were owner-occupied at the beginning of 1949, thjree
had been purchased since the end of the war, another three
during the 1940-45 period, two during the 1930s, and two
in the years prior to 1930s. Approximately half of all fam
ilies owning their own homes at the time of the survey
had bought them since Pearl Harbor.
Fifty-five per cent of the families owning their homes
reported them free of mortgage debt, the survey pointed
out. Three of every 10 post-war buyers reported that
there was no mortgage on their homes.
The survey also indicated that two of every three home
owner reported expenditures for maintaining or improving
their properties in 1948. The average amount of such ex
penditure was approximately $600.
The 18,000,000 non-farm rent-paying families reported
total rent payments in excess of $7,000,000,000 in 1948, .or
a little more than 12 per cent of their total family in
come- The majority indicated no change in their rent bills
during 1948. » •*
The mobility of the population during the postwar period
is Indicated, according to the survey, by the fact that 66
per cent of the rent-paying families and 30 per cent of the
home-owning families said that they moved into their pres
ent quarters ssince the beginning of 1946. In other words,
approximately four of every 10 nonfarm families in the
country moved at least once in the three-year period end
ing on December 81,1948. _
Some of The Things We
Lend Money on
WitdM
Jewelry
Men's Clothing
1(tb
Silverware
Shot Gena
Rifle*
Pistole
Tranks
Addins Machir
Bess
Suit Cases
Mu«iral Instruments
Kodaks
Typewriters
AO
__ Strictly Confidential. When in Need
ef Money We Never Fail Yon.
flne an far hnrsaia in diamonds, watches. Jewelry, clothing, etc.
RELIABLE LOAN CO.
Wl EAST TRADE STREET
Letter Carriers Buy U. S. Savings Bonds
The National
1100,000 and]
•f Letter Carrier* He Mutual
of U. S. Havinr*
National.
14 AtfcocifttioB
by Mn. Tbeli_
—r, on one of the
- forming a bac
D. R Sullivan,
w JM National M Benefit
D. a. on Jane 1# by javeeting
Dawao
Sav
TMBiT fiiKWSE^S? SJSW'JEf'BK
a, Jerome 1. Keating, William C. Doherty, Fred O,
Covered Wagon
Sotting for U. S.
Bond Coromony
The National Association of Let
ter Carriers together with its
Mutual Benefit Association and Na
tional Sick Benefit Association on
June 10 purchased a total of $155.
000 worth of Savings Bonds (Series
G). The investment was divided as
follows: National Association, *35.
000; Mutual Benefit group, $100,
000, and Sick Benefit Association,
$20,000.
. A ceremony of presentation was
held during the visit of an Oppor
tiinity Bond Drive Covered Wagon
tq_ Washington, D. c., with hi^h
officials of uie three groups attend
ing. The Bonds were turned over
by Mrs. The.ma Dawson, an em
ployee of the Washington Building
Trades Council and one of the out
standing volunteer Bonds salesmen
of the country.
As the Covered Wagon drew up
before Labor’s League for Political
Education building it was met by
newsmen, photographers and Asso
ciation representatives. Manned by
voviiissu v v.ga mcutiicu uy
a number of attractive girls dressed
in ’49er costumes, the wagon, rest
ing on a Fruehauf trailer and pow
ered by an International truck,
provided a very colorful setting for
the program.
Representing the National Letter
Carriers Association were: William
C. Doherty, Cincinnati, president;
D. R. Sullivan, San Francisco, vice*
president; Jerome B, Keating, Min
neapolis, secretary; R. B. Kremers,
Seattle, assistant secretary: Phillip
Lepper, New York, and Fred O.
Andrews, Chicago; Mutual Benefit
Association: Everett H. Burns, Los
Angeles, president of the Board;
Ben Sparks, Nashville, chief collec
tor; John W. Schmidt, Milwaukee,
and Thomas Keating, New York;
Sick Benefit Association: Spencer
Locke, Orlando; Thomas Gerraty,
East Orange, N. J.; Peter J. Cahill,
Boston, and Howard M. Nicol,
Cuyahoga Falls. Ohio.
THE ALPHABET IN
SHORT SERMONS
Aim high.
Being is even more important
than doing.
Cultivate cheerfulness.
Do it now.
Every thought, word, and deed
leaves shine impression be
hind.
Fear nothing but your own weak
ness.
Good intentions alone are worth
less.
Hold fast the right; reject the
wrong.
Indolence means failure.
Judiciousness is required in choos
ing associates.
Keeping at it wins success.
Live only one day at a time.
Make each day worth while;
something accomplished,
something done.
Nothing good comes without
striving.
One in the right is equal to one
hundred in the wrong.
Put not off till tomorrow what
you should do today.
Quietness in public places is a
mark of refinement.
Rule yourself before you attempt
to rule others.
Silence usually accompanies
strength.
Truth must be welcomed as such,
or we lose sight of her.
Union is power.
Vice is best vanquished with vir
tue.
Wishbone never takes the place
of backbone. ‘
Xercise is the prime essentia] of
growth.
Youth is the time when habits
are fixed.
—Youth’s Instructor.
LABOR produces all our goods.
And delivers them everywhere;
Labor services all our needs—
And demands an honest share.
BOGGETT
»1 ft. Park Am PImm 1171
LUMBER CO.
It Pay* To Trade Wit* ;
Ittl.MilWU
" 1aC&
AMBULANCE PNONI 6129
^rmdCe-li)£ai5eU,0ftc.
AFL IN NEW YORK STATE
TO BACK LEHMAN IN RACE
New York.—Former Gov. Her
bert H. Lehman won the support
of the New York State Federation
of Labor’s Non-Partisan Commit
tee in his bid for election as Dem
ocratic-Liberal candidate for Sen
ator. The union leaders voted tc
support Mr. Lehman by a unani
mous vote of the 17 out of 24
delegates present at a meeting to
review the political situation.
Thomas A. Murray, president
of the federation, said that before
the vote was taken the merit of
Senator John Foster Dulles, the
Republican candidate, and Mr
New and Reconditioned
PIANOS
For the boot value in NEW or
reconditioned pianos, select
yours from our stock of nearly
100 instruments. Setinway,
Mathushek, Winter, Howard, |
and many others. Prices to
suit everyone.
ANDREWS MUSIC CO.
“Our 55th Year"
“Steinway Headquarter*”
SSI North Tryoa Street
START
THE COMMERCIAL
NATIONAL BANK
PO Wt RLilZL R
lanos
m
I» An Important Part ot Taw
Child's Education
It is educational, cultural,
spiritual and exciting.
See the new 73 note W urlits
or spinnette piano, only $395.00
plus bench and tax.
Other fine spinnette pianos
88 note, price $495.00 plus
bench and tax.
Fine Grand Pianos $695.00 to
$1,800.00 plus bench and tax.
Other fine makes that we
sell, Ivers 4k Pond, Poole and
Sohmer.
Always in stock, used and
•econditioned upright pianos.
Bargain prices $100X0 to
$200.00. Terms hs low as $6.00
monthly. Free Delivery.
PARKER GARDNER GO.
118 W. Trade Charlotte. N. C
Lehman was considered. He said
the federation would start imme
diately on a program to aid the
former governor.
VACATION’S IND
If you don’t wont your vocation to and like this,
remember this: Spaed kill*I Ona out of ovary
three fatal motor vehicle accidents involves ex
cessive speed. Ihko it oaey and lfva/
B* Caroful—tho I if* you savo may bo your
For Indigestion, Sour Stomach and Gas, Take
NA-CO TABLETS
MONET BACK GUARANTEE
SELWYN CUT RATE DRUG STORE
NEXT TO POST OFFICE
A Bird You Want To Know
r
Proudly wo wo (X
ROOSTER - tho mr emMea of
Colonial Stores.
no C8 Roootor lu • Mf wap
of identifying Big Star uad Llttfo
Star Storoa, aad aboro all — ▲
MARK OP QUALITY FOOPS.
loin tho thoaaaada ahaniag
under tho alga of tho CS ROOST
ER today — you'll ho glad that
you did!
COLONIAL STORES
INC0IP01AT1D
Martin’s Department Store
RELIABLE MERCHANDISE ALWAYS
AT LOW PRICES
Shop ai VfluUdin and Sod*
SHOES—CLOTHING—FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
AT CORNER TRADE AND COLLEGE
i
T
This is haw Chic Yawns, Mm cartoonist, mwhai a Mrs! rough shatch far Mm famous strip.
m Q^M*. 1
|w *-■f kilt *»r4
. t*CUf'i‘Z * »»7j
inlaws??'
aTTrarfl
STEP BY STEP...
that’s the way it’s dona successfully!
AS you CAM BUM, Chic Young, who
A draws the popular "Blondie” comic
strip, goes through many steps to arrive
at a finished cartoon.
And, cartoonist Chic Young, together
with millions of other smart Americans,
will tell you that the step-by-step
method is the easiest, surest way of
doing anything worth while.
Particularly, saving money.
One of the easiest and surest ways to
Mt adds any worth while amount of
money is to boy United States Savings
Bonds the step-by-step method—
So set aside a regular amount week
after week, month after month, year
after year. Then in 10 short years you
will have a mighty nice nest egg tucked
away.
Ge» Marled new. Get your Bonds
thro.:0 Payroll Savings or at your bank
or poet office.
AUTOMATIC SAVING IS SURE SAVING -U. S. SAVINGS BONOS
Contributed by this magazine in co-operation witk the
Magazine Publishers of America as a public service.
i
    

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