North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE SIX
THE FfcANkUN PkfeSI AND THE HIGHLANDS MACONIAN
THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1939
2,000 GATHER
AT CLIFFSIDE
(Continued From Pagw One)
and of' patrolling the . highway
throughout the day. Business men
of Franklin and Highlands through
the Chamber of Commerce donated
the entire amount necessary for
financing the free barbecue.
The Barbecue
The barbecue was made up of
three hogs, weighing 330 pounds,
five lambs weighing .385 pounds,
and 80 pounds' of hamburger for
the brunswick stew. One hundred
pounds of salt was required to
salt down all the meat, five and
one-half gallons of vinegar was
used on the barbecue and two
. hundred loaves of bread were con
sumed 800 plates were served.
Meat was started cooking at 4
o'clock in the morning and was
. ready by 4 p. m,
Approximately ISO people stayed
for the showing of the motion
pictures in the amphitheatre at 8
p. m. Films shown were "Trees of
Life" and "Recreation on the Nah
tahala" the latter in color.
The Cliffside Lake and Recre
ational area will be open to the
public through the entire season,
with the advantages of open air
fireplaces and table for preparing
meals, all fire wood being con
ventiently supplied, and all services
necessary being rendered by CCC
enrollees and forest employees.
including a -life guard on duty at
the lake during the week and
Sundays. This addition to the rec
reational facilities of Macon coun
ty will not only attract many
tourists and visitors, but will prove
to be a real boon to residents in
furnishing an ideal location for
outirigs. So spacious are the ac
comodations offered, that a large
number of parties can be had at
the same time without interfering
with separate groups.
Zone Meeting
Of Methodist W. M. S.
Held At Bethel Church
The Zone meeting of the Wo
man',?; Missionary societies of the
Methodist churches in Macon
county met Wednesday at the
Bethel Methodist church on the
Franklin-Highlands highway for
the regular quarterly meeting.
Mr,s. Fred Slagle, county zone
leader, presided over the business
session. Reports were given from
the, five societies present, includ
ing, Iotla, Franklin, Union, Mt.
Zion and Bethel, showing splendid
work accomplished during the past
quarter.
Those taking parts on the pro
gram were Mrs. P. F. Callahan,
who was in charge of the devo
tional, after 'which she made a
very interesting talk, using as her
theme "Peace." Mrs. Gordon Moore
read an article on "Fear of War",
followed by a talk on "Education
for Peace", by Mrs. Pearl Hunter,
whn narticularlv stressed that
through educating our youths, the
As the World
Turns
Church Services
Franklin Methodist Church
The Rev. Ivon L. Roberts, Pattor
(Each Sunday)
10 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Worship services.
7:30 p. m. Vesper service.
Baptist Church
Rev. C F. Rogers, Pastor
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Preaching service.
7 p. m.B. T. U.
8:00 p. m. Preaching service.
Wed., 8 p. m. Prayer service.
(Continued from P&ge One)
on a Department of Justice bus
from Atlanta to Lewisburg, Pa.,
12 miles south of Frederickburg,
Va., on Wednesday overpowered
Major H. B. Nicholson, superin
tendent state police, commandeered
a car., driven by a woman, who
was later put out on the highway,
and escaped. The fugitives were
white men.
LENDING BILL BUFFETED
A Democratic member of the
house banking committee said he
and three other Democratic com
mitteemen had agreed with Re
publicans on an attempt to shelve
the administration's lending bill if
it contain, a rider to restore
WPA's prevailing wage scale. Bi
partison attacks were made on the
bill Wednesday.
.
DOCTORS WIN SUIT
A federal district judge tossed
out of court an indictment, pro
cured at the instance of the justice
department, against the American
danger of war would be eliminated, Medical association, three medical
. ... i ..... I : . i ii !:..:.! 1
thus restoring peace to our noui organizations, anq (.1 jnuiviuu.ii
physicians, 1 tie indictment Had
charged violation of the anti-trust
ADDITIONAL
FRANKLIN
SOCIAL ITEMS
MRS. WERNER HONORED
AT BRIDGE TEA
Mrs. Douglas W. Nichols, Jr.,
and Mrs. Hugh Creasman honor
ed Mrs. Jack O. Werner, who will
leave in August for her new home
in Asheville, with a bridge-tea on
Wednesday afternoon at-the home
of the former, on Riverview street.
Mrs. John Hamer won the high
score prize, and Mrs. Henderson
Calloway was awarded the travel
ing prize, while Mrs. James Aver
ell won the cut prize. Mrs. Aver
ell presented her prize to the hon
oree. The hostesses presented the
honoree with' a lovely prize.
Those invited were: Mrs. Paul
H. Gerrard, Cleveland, Tenn. ; Mrs.
John Davenport, Boston, Mass.;
Mrs. Howard Wooster, Washing
ton, D. C. ; Mrs. Sloan Murray,
Mrs. Charles Melichar, . Mrs. John
Wasilik, Jr., Mrs. L. H. Page. Mrs.
Henderson Calloway, Mrs. John
Hamer, Mrs. Jack O. Werner,
Mrs. H. L. Church, Mr,. Truman
Moody, Mrs. Averell. and Mrs.
Ray Brandt.
and country.
The next zone meeting will be
held at the .Iotla Methodist churcn
in September.
Presbyterian Church
Rev. J. A. Flanagan, Pastor
Franklin" (Each Sunday)
I 10 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Worship services.
Morrison (Each Sunday)
2:30 p. m. Sunday school.
(Each 2nd and 4th Sunday)
3:30 p. m. Worship services.
St Agnes Episcopal Church
The Rev. Frank Bloxham, Rector
II a. m. Morning Prayer and
sermon.
St John's Catholic Parish
Schedule of Maseesj
Franklin:
2nd and 4th Sunday, 8 a. m.
Murphy:
Every 1st Sunday, 7 a. m.
HiwMsee Dam:
1st Saturday, 8:30 a. m.
Cherokee:
Every 3rd Sunday, 8 a. m.
Waynasville:
Every Sunday, 11 a. m. .
Macon Circuit
Rev. J. C. Swaun, Pastor
First Sunday, 11 a. m. Union;
2:00 p. m. Hickory Knoll; 7:30
p. m. Asbury.
Second Sunday, 11:00 a. m. Mt.
Zion; 2:30 p .m. Maiden's,; 7:30
p. m. Pat ton's.
Thiitf Sunday, 11 :00 a. m. As
bury; 2:00 p. m. Mulberry; 3:00
p. m. uryman's ; 7:30 p. m. Un
ion. .
Fourth Sunday, 11 a. m. Pat
ton's; 2:30 p. m. Maiden's; 7:30
p. m. Mt. Zion.
Dr. Truett's Gavel Made
Of Historic Materials
What was described as "perhaps
the most historic Baptist gavel in
the world" was used Saturday by
Dr. George W. Truett, of Dallas,
Texas, to open the Sixth uapusi
World Alliance. .
It was presented to Dr. Truett
by Minetry L. Jones, , member of
the board of trustees of William
Jewell College, Liberty, Mo., who
explained it brought together woou
from: ;
A church where John Bunyan
was bell-ringer in 1530; a tree on
the site of the first Baptist Church
organized on the North American
Continent in Nova Scotia; the old
est Baptist Church in the Colo
nies, organized in 1638 at Provi
dence, . R. 1.; a tree planted in
India in 1795 by William Carey,
first Baptist missionary to India;
the oldest Baptist church west of
the Mississippi, built in 1806 near
Jackson, Mo.
In the ends of the gavel, Jones
added, are two stones from the
site of the crucifixion, northwest
of Jerusalem.
The material for the gavel was
collected by the Rev. Claude War-
rail Kelly, of Hot Springs, Ark.
It is bound with silver rings.
Marines Assign Hershel
Henson To Fleet Duty
U. S. Marines recently complet
ing initial training at the Marine
training center, Parns Island, S,
C, and transferred to duty with
the fleet Marine force, Quantico,
Va., included Hershel H. Henson,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Eli Henson
of Prentiss, Captain A. C. Small,
District Recruiting Officer at Sa
vannah, ua., announced.
Duty in .the fleet force will gain
Henson a knowledge of the in
tricate principles of combat and
tactic, and will take him on many
maneuvers, both on home and for
eign soil, conducted by this or
ganization.
Henson enlisted in the Marines
at the Marine recruiting Office,
Post Office Building, Savannah, on
May ' 20th. He is a graduate of
Franklin High School, class of 1939.
' Entrance examinations for ser
vice in the Marines are being
held at the Savannah station. Full
information and application forms
will be mailed upon request, Cap
tain Small stated.
m uaui
Asm i
V.
O GRADES .f
SOLES and HBffLS
to suit vour sbt your purse
MACON SHOE SHOP
Formerly Wilton' Shoe .Shop
Et Main St, .Franklin, fi. CI
John W. Roane On
FSA Committee
John W. Roane, Route 1. Frank
lin, has been appointed by he
secretary of agriculture to become
a member bf the Macon county
tenant purchase advisory commit
tee,' according to word received by
William G. Davis, FSA supervisor,
from State Director'' Vance E,
Swift.
The new committeeman was ap
pointed to succeed Ed B. Byrd
Stiles, N. G, whose term expired
June 30, 1939. Mr. Roane is a
leading farmer in this county and
take, an active part in all com
munity activities.' His duty will be
to assist other members of the
committee in helping with opera
tions of the FSA Tenant Pur
chase Program in the county
Other members of the committee
are Albert L. Ramsey, Route 3,
Franklin, and Walter C. Taylor,
Route 4, Franklin.
At the same, time the new ap
pointment was, announced, William
O. Davis, received word that the
Tenant Purchase program will be
extended in Macon county for an
other year. '
Macon county was one of 100
counties in North Carolina select
ed for the placing of farm pur
chase loans during the second
year. So far, the Farm Security
Administration has loaned $34,-
962.00 to 8 Macon county families
for the purchase of family sized
farms averaging 94 acre each.
laws. '
The justice department announce
ed in a formal statement tonight
that "every effort1' would be made
to get a supreme court decision
on the district court's action "at
the earliest possible moment."
The charges involved interfer
ence with plans of a group health
association. '
.
HATCH BILL
President Roasevelt said
Tuesday that he had referred the
Hatch bill to restrict political ac
tivity by. federal employes to gov
ernment departments for study
mm
M'NINCH RESIGNS
Chairman Frank R. McNinch of
the federal communications com
mission indicated he had submit'
ted Ws resignation to Mr. Roose
velt Tuesday.
U. S. CANCELS
TREATY WITH JAPAN
Capital circles were startled Wed
nesday by the announcement that
Secretary of State Hull, had serv
ed notice to the Japanese embassy
that the United States was termi
nating its 1911 treaty of commerce
and navigation with Japan, thereby
opening the way toward an em
bargo on the shipment of raw ma
terials to that country.
WORLD YOUTH MEET
From 69 countries are gathered
1,600 delegates for 10 days in
Amsterdam, Holland for the World
Conference of Christian Youth,
over 300 young people attending
from the United States. On last
Monday, the opening day, the wel
come was extended by Prince Ber
nard on behalf of Queen VVilhel
mina, and the gathering address
ed by the Archbishop of York.
With the exception of the Roman
Catholic denomination, practically
all churches of the world, includ
ing the Greek and old-Catholic
churches, . are - represented. The
gathering is a mobilization of
Christian youth to witness to the
reality of the Christian commun
ity as the supra-national body.
. e
BOMBINGS JN ENGLAND
Following a series of bombings
in England attributed to Irish Re
publican terrorists;, bomb explosions
on Wednesday wrecked a canal
bridge in Liverpool and baggage
check rooms in two of London's
railway stations, with one dead
and 22 injured. .
TRI-POWER ALLIANCE
After 15 weeks of negotiations,
Paris announced Wednesday that
the tri-power alliance among Great
Britain, France and Soviet Russia
for joint action against European
aggregression was expected to be
agreed upon in 48 hours
JAPAN'S MOVE
AGAINST RUSSIA
Japan has moved to checl Soviet
border fighting by putting Man
choukuo on a war basis. Tokyo
fears that Moscow is increasing
its military aid to Nationalist
China following Britain's recowii
zation of the status of Japanese
armed lorces in China.
'..,
ARABS RELEASE
AMERICAN
me iev. u. K. uoisner, Ohio
pastor, kidnapped last week bv
desert tribesman in Palestine, was
released Tuesday on payment of
$2,500 ransom by his father and
triends. On arrival in Jerusalem
he reported a gruelling experience.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Rickman and
Mrs. Elizabeth Waldroop spent
rnuay m Asheville.
Mrs. Richard Jones leaves
Thursday for a two weeks' visit
to her sister, Mrs. Green, of Lan
caster, S. C.
Mr, and Mrs. Titus Parrish, of
Detroit, Mich., and Miss, Bonnie
Parrish, of Robbinsville, were vis
iting their parents, Mr. and Mrs
E. H. Parrish, at their home at
West's Mill this week.
Clarence Curtis, of Aberdeen,
Wash., is: spending several days
in Franklin with his brother, W.
F. Curtis; in Sylva visiting his
brother, Henry Curtis, and at
Bryson City with his sister, Mrs.
Florence Hampton.
Mr. and Mrs, Ralph Bryson and
young daughter,-of Detroit, Mich.,
are visiting their parents, Robert
T. Bryson and Mrs. Bryson and
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Morgan, at
their homes at West's Mill.
Dr. Angel Opens Trout
Stream To Public
The Press has received for pub
lication the following . notice from
Dr. .Furmari Angel which will be
welcome news to trout fishermen:
"From now until the close of
the fishing season the public is
welcome and invited to fish in my
trout stream which includes five
miles of the Cullasaja river and
two miles of Buck Creek. No
wardens will be present and the
only laws to be' complied with are
the state laws: concerning the
number and the size of the fish
caught."
(Signed) Dr. Furman Angel.
Summer School
Closed July 21
The summer school which has
been conducted at the Franklin
High School building, closed July
21.
. The enrollment this year was I
29, with many taking two subjects.
Results have been very satisfactory J
10 pairons, pupils ana teachers.
The faculty wjuf composed of
Mrs. Lola P. Barnngton. director,
and Miss -Kathryn Porter and
Mrs. Kate M. Rhinehart, associate
teachers.
Classified
Advertisements
FOR SALE Ten bushels of Ab-
ruzzi rye at $1.00 per bushel. W,
M, Arnold, Cullasaja, N. C.
ltp
We are interested in all minerals
in this section. - Bring samples to
our plant for examination.
MINERALS, INC..
Ellis C. Soper. Pres.
J 1 3 4tc A3
FOR SALE Crushed corn feed
meal, 1 cent per pound, baled soy
bean and millet hay, shredded
shucks at 50 cents per bale about
100 lbs. Ada McCoy. Franklin. N. C.
tfc
DECLINE
Cash income from the sale of
American farm products in the
first five months of 1939 amounted
to $2,466,000,000, a decline of four
per cent from the same period in
1938.
. I
EXPORTS
During the first nine months of
the current marketing scaion. the
world's eight largest exporting na
tions shipped 7,924,000 bales of cot
ton as compared with Q.250.000
bales last year,
A few bicycles left at $20.00 each.
Built by the makers of Columbia
Bicycles standard of the world.
Have both boys' and girls' sizes.
If you will buy a wheel see me
uick. C. T. BLAINE
J27-2tc A3
STEADY WORK-GOOD PAY
WANTED Reliable man to call
on farmers in Macon County. No
experience or capital required. Make
up to $12 a day. Write Furst &
Thomas, Candler Bldg. Baltimore,
Md.
FOR SALE Summer hats be
low cast. Voile, lace, linen and
print dresses. Silk dresses and
ooats. Fall felts. Hosiery, under
wear. Pottery. John B. Stetsons,
$1.00-BARGAINS, .
MY LADY'S SIIOPPE
ltp
PUT IN YOUR WINTER
WOOD SUPPLY NOW We can
deliver Oak Wood for $1.50,
Mixed wood $1.25 and Chestnut
wood $1.00 on Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday or Thursday of each
wcek.-ZICKGRAF HARDWOOD
COMPANY. Phone 134.
J20-2tc J27
i'UK SALE Fve shares nf
Highlands Nantahala Company
stock, otherwise known as High
lands Country Club. This comnanv
nas paid dividends the past two
years. Address McClov H. Martin.
3i irvington Avenue, Jackson
ville, Fla.
J6-4tc-J27
Bryant Furniture Co.
EVERYTHING FOR
THE HOME
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Phone 106 FrntK. N r
City And County Tax
Officers To Meet
The Institute of Government will
hold a meeting of citv and county
tax and fiscal officers of the tenth
and eleventh congressional dis
tricts at the courthouse in Ashe
ville on Saturday, August 12.
1 he meeting will begin at 1 :30
P. ni. and last throughout the af
ternoon.
Topics for discussion include
new tax collection and foreclosure
laws and precedure, taxation of
governmental property and securi
ties of one governmental unit toy.
another, pensions for city and
county employees, and federal re
lief legislation.
The tax and finance officers of
Buncombe county and the city of
Asheville- will be hosts at this
meeting of chairmen of the boards
of county commissioners, county
managers, mayors, city manager.,
city clerks, city and county at
torneys, tax collectors and ac
countants and other fiscal officials.
Small Farmer To Gain
From 1940 AAA Program
A greater opportunity for small
farmers to participate will one
of the most important features of
the 1940 AAA program, accordintr
to E. Y. Floyd. AAA executive
officer at State college.
Likewise, soil conservation will
have increased emphasis, in view
of its phenomenal progress dur
ing the past few. years. As in
other years, the responsibility of
administration will continue in the
hands bf farmer committees. ;
An important recommendation
made at a recent Washington con
ference which Floyd attended, and
one which should help small farm
ers take part in the program, was
that there be established a min
imum soil-building allowance of
$20 per farm.
Another important recommenda
tion would allow farmers to earn
up to $30 per farm for tree
planting, in addition to the regu
lar soil building allowance for the
farm.
Floyd also said state and local
AAA committeemen will have
more responsibility for the field
administration of . crop insurance
and loans. This is in line with the
establishment AAA policy of de
centralizing administration of the
program wherever possible.
"This year," Floyd stated, "the
national conference was held a
month earlier than last. This will
give farmers in 1940 a better
chance than ever to know well in
advance of the planting season
what ,the program has to offer
them."
Recommendations adopted at the
recent national conference of AAA
officials will be used for drafting
specific provisions of the 1940 pro
gram. In general, it will continue
along the same lines as the 1939
program. Changes recommended
are those which will simplify ad
ministration and make the pro
gram more effective from the
standpoint of soil conservation.
SMART MONEY
SNOWS
WHERE TO ,fm
GO AFTER
READING
THE AOS
IN THIS ''"'r
NEWSPAPER,
- "I I
wm
Coal $7.5 JPer Tom
I have contract with mine so I can deliver you
coal until September 15th at above price.
SEE ME FOR STOKER COAL
L. B. PHILLIPS
Phone 11 4-J Franklin N C.
.
H
Trade at Ashear's
Ashear's store is a good place to
trade every department being
complete for every member of the
family
MEN'S SHOES FOR HOT nAYc
Solid leather, Goodyear welt, cushion arch-
reel like dress shoes. Price is right
$1.95 to $2.95
: LADIES' WHITE SHOES
now is tne time to buy! All sizes, but broken
lots, rrice is cut to close out
20 to 30 off
LADIES' DRESSES
45c to $4.95
CHILDREN'S DRESSES
25c to 98c
LADIES' SILK PANTIES
15c to 50c
PRINCESS' SLIPS
25c to $1.48
LADIES' SILK HOSE, FULL FASHION
50c
BOYS' SCHOOL SHIRTS
sizes 8 to 14
25c
u .YS' OVERALLS
Heavy Weight-White Back Denim Bib
50c
Zipper, "Like Dad's"
- 75c
We can't quote everything wie have in our
store, but you can find what you want and a
the prices you wish to pay.
SEE US FOR BARGAINS
Joseph Ashear
"We Clothe the Family"
FRANKLIN, N. C.
    

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