North Carolina Newspapers

    THURSDAY. MARCH 20, 1M1
PACE TWO
THE FRANKLIN PRESS AND THE HIGHLANDS MACONIAN
TOTAL VICTORY
TOTAL EFFORT
. . it
President Tells World
.Objectives Of The
United States
Warning that sacrifice and in
convenience lie ahead for all, Pres
ident Roosevelt Saturday night
made a "total victory" over the
dictators the objective of an Amer
ican "total , effort," . unflaggingly
sustained, to place the implements
of warfare in the hands of na
tions resisting aggression.
"You will feel Uc impact of
this gigantic effort in your daily
lives," he said in an address be
fore the White House Correspon
dents association in Washington.
"You will fee! ' it in a way . that
will cause you many inconv.en
ienccs." '
No Profiteering
The nation must be. prepared . for
lower profits and longer hours of
labor, he said. The arms program
must not be obstructed by "un
necessary striken" The idea of
"normalcy" and "business as usual"
must be abandoned. There must
be "no war profiteering."
And, he hailed the passage of
the lease-lend bill by congress as
4 decision ending "any attempts
at appeasement in our land; the
end of urging iis to get along with
the dictators; the end of comprcK
mise with tyranny and th,c forces
of oppression."
The address was one of the pres
ident's most vigorous utterances, a
speech bristling with determination
to eliminate niazism as a world
force, and dedicating the material
and industrial resources of the
country anew to that purpose.
World-Wide Audience
From the ballroom of the Wil
lard hotel, his words went out,
not. only to the people .of this
country by way of all the big net -"works,
but by short wave in 14
languages, including those of all
the German-occupied nations.
! As the president ispoke, he stood
between two flags the American
flag and the blue flag that sym
bolized the highest office in the
land. He was frequently interrupt
ed by applaus,e, and particularly
when he said that arms produc
tion should not be obstructed by
"unnecessary strikes" or ".by short
sighted management."
Here Today
Gone Tomorrow
HARTFORD, CONN.,
No single catastrophe
the
Great-Grandmother at 48
1
r
r :
1 1 ;T
V c
f
A great-grandmother at the age of 48, Laura Bowen (center) proudly
holds her great-grandson, three-weeks-old Gerald Horton. With Mra.
Bowen is her daughter, Lucy Horton, 32, and Mrs. Horton's son,
Luther, 17, father of Gerald. The group are all from St. Louis, Mo.
Co w ee
The Snow Hill Methodist church
is beginning a series of prayer
services Friday, March 21. They
will start at 7:30 p. m.
The Sunday school convention
will be h.eld Sunday, 'March 23, at
the Kot Creek church.
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Smith and
daughter of Cullowhee spent the
week-end among relatives here.
Mr and Mrs. Harry West, of
Candler, visited relatives Sunday.
Ralph Shelton, who is employed
in Ashevillc, spent Sunday with his
family.
Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Leatherman
celebrated their 25th anniversary
March 12. . :V1'1.. . . .
A shower was given to Mr. and
Mrs. J.udd Duvall at the home of
Fred Lowe Wednesday, March 12.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hurst was
iven a shower at the home of
D. T. Alien last Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Feck an
nounce the birth' of a , son March
17, at their home at West's Mill.
We are , glad to 1 say Mr. Paul
Potts and Luther Raby who have
been sick, are improving.
Join Now
Potts' Burial Ass'n.
Protect Thm Wkole Family
Fine Solid Oak CaakeU
Office Ore Pendergntea' Store
JCOLDS
666
To relieve
Misery of
LIQUID
TABLETS
SALVE
NOSE DROPS
COUCH DROPS
RtA-Mj-TUm"- Wonderful
Liniment
Try'
This Week In Defense
Congress passed and the Presi
dent signed the Lease-Lend Act.
The President sent a request to
Congress for $7,000,000,000, to fi
nance the Lease-Lend' program.
The Budget Bureau, recommend
ed that the President be permitted
to'-transfer up to 20 per cent of
the funds for any -specific item
to any other category, so long as
transfers did not increase any
category by niore than 30 per
cent. In addition to empowering the
President to make available to
other governments defense mater
ial and equipment, the Lease-Lend
Act also provides that the powers
granted, unless revoked earlier by
concurrent Congressional resolu
tion, shall end June 30, 1934; that
the President report - to Congress
at least every 90 days on the op
erations under the Act ; and that
repayment to the United States by
other: governments niay be made
in any way the President deems
satisfactory. -
Naval Expansion -
Congress passed t,'le fourth sup
plemental national defense appro
priation act providing $1,533,500,000,
United States last year approached f which $33000 will go ' for
the daily average of almost 100
lives lost in automobile accidents,
according to a new booklet en
titled "Here Today " just issued
4y the Travelers Insurance V com
pany. The booklet is the eleventh
in a series issued annually, and
presents a comprehensive analysis
of the facts about accidents in
which 35,000 persons wer.e killed
. and more than 1,300,000 others
were injured in 1940.
Automobile accidents, on an aver
age day last year took twice the
number of lives lost, in the Kenvil,
N. J powder blast, three-times the
toll of the Georgia-South Carolina
hurricane, and four times that of
the ' Little Falls train wreck or
the Lovetsville. airplane crash, the
report says. The number injured
in traffic on an average day ex
ceeded the total casualties of the
Lt major disasters -of 1940 com
bined. "If fatalities make news," the
booklet points out, "then the na
tion's traffic death toll is the ban
ner headline story 365 days of
every year."
Nantahala
National Forest
Did vyvA
That
Friday, March 21, is Arbor Day
in the State of North Carolina.
' ,Tke superintendent of public in
struction each year issues a pro
gram for its observance by the
school children of the State in
order that they may be taught to
appreciate the true value of trees
. and forests to their State.
Arbor Day originated and was
first observed in Nebraksa in 1872.
. The plan was conceived and the
name "Arbor Day" proposed by
J. Sterling Morton, then a mem
ber of the State Board of Agri
culture, and later United States
Secretary of Agriculture.
Arbor Day was first observed
in North Carolina in 1893. The
present law was enacted in 1917.
The United States Forest Serv
ice is probably the largest single
Agency in the State of North
Carolina active primarily in the
Dronaeation of trees. With its
800,000 acres of timberland com
prising the Nantahala, Pisgah,
Uharie and Croatan National For
est, it is actively engaged in
growing trees on a mammoth scale.
Truth crushed to earth will rise
again and the crushing and the
rising conetitut continuous performance.
a naval base in t uerto Kico ana
$4,700,000 for liarbor r improvements
at Guam. '
The President asked Congress for
an additional emergency naval ap
propriation of $3()0,(aX),000, of which
$133,000,000 would be used for ac
quisition' of guns and ammunition
and $63,000,000 for 12 more, fleet
auxiliary cargo ships.
Defense Plant Expansion
The War Department dedicated
the $44,100,000 smokeless powder
plant at Radford, Va., which is
one of a chain of 40 munitions
factories. .
The Ciovernnient awarded $44,
400,000 for expansion tr construc
tion of other defense plants, and
OPM Director Knudsen reported
the British (ioverriment financed'
expansion of 61 plants, the United
States, 302 plants.
Labor Supply
OPM Director ' General Knudsen
reported that between May, 1940,
and January, 1941, 1,445,000 addi
tional persons were working in
nonagricultunal industries. To find
several million additional workers
needed for the balance of this
year, OPM asked defense indus
tries to call on Government em
ployment agencies.
Federal Security Administrator
McNutt announced an intensive
one-month drive to register the
Nation's potential defense workers
at State employment offices, be
ginning March 15. An appeal is be
ing issued to every unemployed
worker in the country, and to
those persons with urgently need
ed skills which are not being iised
in their present jobs, Mr. McN'utt
isaid.
Defense Housing
The House passed and sent to
the Senate a bill authorizing a
$150,000,000 . expansion in the de
fense housing program, in addition
to the $150,000,0000 authorized and
appropriated in the la-st session of
the 76th Congress
The Army
President Rooisevelt called for
the observance of Army Day on
April 7, and the War Department
estimated the : present strength of
the' Army at 1.003,000 officers and
men. '
Aviation
The. OPM announced that during
February 972 airplanes were de
livered by manufacturers to the
Army and Navy, British and other
governments and commercial air
planes, as .compared with 1,036 in
January and 799 in December. .The
lower total resulted from fewer
days in the month.
OPM Director Knudsen said that
during 1940 domestic airlines were
at. their highest .efficiency-and said
the airlines would continue to re
ceive motors, propellers and other
replacement materials.
WPA And Defense
WPA inaugurated a 48-hour week
on defense construction projects
mainly airports, : access roads and
more than 3900 buildings at Army
and Navy posfcs. The change af
fects approximately 200,000 work
ers, ' causing increases from 20 to
60 per. cent in the average work
week.
Defense Labor Strikes
The Labor' Department reported
strikes and labor disputes in Janu
ary, numbered 220, an increase of
60 over December, 1940. There
wer.e oj.uuu workers involved in
the strikes compared with 40,000
the previous' months, the Bureau
said. The OPM Labor Division an
nounced settlement during the week
of 13 strikes br threatened strikes
in defense industries.
Health, Welfare, Morale
The-Red Cross advised the Army
it would purchase up to $1,000,000
worth 5T equipment for Army and
Navy , recreational camps and the
WPA. announced it will extend its
Library Service in the defense cen
tres. The War . Department an
nounced creation of a new Mppftle
Branch of the Army ranking equal
ly with other branches. The Public
Health Service established a spe
cial training school for physicians,
.engineers, nurses and laboratory
technicians at the National Insti
tute of Health, Bethesda, Md.
000 an uM0cc-fv' c r-r
MILES ;-NFj;
LONG
ON TMI
IGREATP1AI
7 ttrtCM
KffJ IJY7H
"k.. Sk "
UNDER ANY
CONDITIONS
MbUlLGO FAR
WITH
rss61
IXTR
PUTS MUSCLE
IN VbUR MOTOR
DO YOUEi
EASTER
At
Sanders' New 5 & 10c Store
Men's Easter Hats
Large brims nar
row bands, colors
gray, brown,
black, medium
gray. Also new
sport hats for
young men all
new shades and
styles. Values to $2.9 8.
Special for Next few
weeks. Come take a look at them !
$1.98
Men's Dress Pants
New Shades New Patterns
$1.98 - $2.65 - $2.75
Men's Dress
Oxfords
1 Black and Brown
Priced -$1.98-$2.98-$3.50
Men's Plough Shoes
Special Value
$1.50
Boys' New Sport Hats, special 98c
Men's Overalls, special ........... $1.25
ANVIL BRAND
Children's Overalls 50c
-..',- (All Sizes) '
Men's Dress Shirts, the new kind
with snap on cuffs, all new QQc
patterns, also whites, spec.
Boys' Dress Oxfords, ' special $1 .75
value for next two weeks
Childrens' Shoes, all kinds, in
all sizes brown black white, QQc
patent leather
Ladies' Shoes, oxfords, pumps,
ties, patents, whites brown
and white, all new , shoes $ 1 .89
extra special
In the 10c Department
We Have Assembled for Easter
Bunnies, Easter Baskets, Wagons,
Cards, Easter Candies, Egg Dye.
COME TO SEE A LARGE
SELECTION
Costume Jewelry to Beautify your
dresses Brooches, Pins, Necklaces
andl Crosses
10 and 25 cents
In Our Dry Goods Dept.
EASTER SPECIALS
We have Large Size Bedspreads
rose, gold, lavender, green and
blue, priced
49c
Curtains Full Long Attractive
Colors and White
49c
New Line of Prints just ar
rived, 36 in., fast color, yd.
10
Ladies' Aprons, attractively Cc
made, fast colors
Ladies' Full Fashioned
Hose .
50'
Ladies' Dresses and Jacts
Just arrived for Easter " .
Bu Now and Save!
$1.98 - $2.98 - $3.50
Boys' Wash Suits, Baby Suits
sizes 1 to 10 beautiful Cflc
garments
LITTLE GIRLS' DRESSES
Special for Easter
25c and 50c
Sanders' Store
New 5 M 10c Store
i
MUGGS AND SKEETER
S.S f. -BAY. WMOS srAtfJS WHEM "XX GAJfiE. B0J
VfeArlt
WHAT'S HIS
RACKETllS ME
OR StyETOlMT
VJfTM U8 VMR'S CVER?
A, Ml,,, l ' '
r M MO! Ml Art kmUe!
rawa j cww iwm
TTilitlif1 w UC1M
n
I MUST TWV T& MAtt Vo0-
Dv WALLY E1SHO?
QlCt)
Tl
w
I T TTVl
J
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view