North Carolina Newspapers

    WATCH THE LABEL ON YOUR
PAPER, IT CABBIES THE DATE
TOUE SUBSCRIPTION EXPIRES
' VOLUME XXV—NUMBER 88
INCREASE IN CRIME
STATE ASTONISHING
Total of US hirtaisli Retarn
ed Past Year Aa Agate* 2,753
Yssr Previous
Raleigh, Dae. IX—Turlington law
violators as reflected in Attorney-
Geaetal Manning's biennial report
show astonishing increases for 1923-
i 924 over the year previous, 4,322
indictments having been made under
this act jm against 2,753 far the year
{revious.
Crimes have increased generally
though the homicidal offenses have
been of lesser degree while multiply
ing- Convictions far murder ia the
ftrst degree were five for the last
year's period as against 14 for the
year before, but in the same period
second degree offenses jumped from
191 to 232. Onslow led in first de
cree killings, having four, Cohunbu -
snd Edgecetmbe and two each. Gran
ville, Haywood. Lenoir, Buncombe.
Rowan and Wilson, one each. Edge
>rasnbe, Hoke, Perquimans. Vance and
Mecklenburg furnished the five firs
I'.egree slaughters listed in the at
torney-general's report.
The whole number of criminal ac
tions for the last year was 14,321
ind for the year before 11,813. Firs'
regree murder, criminal per
jury, disturbing religious w.irsh'p,
official raise- rouet and viola' : on o'
election laws have decreased.
Wake, the hub of the stat", center
of schools, law and accessories, liads
it: prohibition violations. The capi
tal county had 242 for last year.
Vgainst 191. Curriluek kul no viola
tions far two years. Omden, Dare
Hyde and Stanly had one each.
JOHN E. GUAGANUS
DIED SATURDAY
Mr. John Ed Gurganus died at his
home near Bear Grass last Saturday
after an illness lasting most three
years.
Mr. Gurganus was able to be up
and about most of the time during
his illness, but it was seen long be
I fore the end came that heights disease!
hail • w r v * a •"
Mr. Gurganus was 51 years old
in July, the son of Daniel and Martha
Gurganus. He married Miss Mollie
Robersoa who with his mother and
brother survives him.
The funeral was held by Elders B.
"S- Cowing and John N. Rogers on
last Sum lay afternoon. Interment waf
made ia the family cemetery.
Kpworth League
Meet i n r
The Epworth League met last night
with Miss Josephine Sykes, president,
presiding with the usual large numbe;
if members present- Two meeting;
were merged into one which were botl
\ery good and inspiring.
It was decided upon the invitation
of the pastor that the League take
full charge of the devotional pari o*
next Sunday night's regular service.
Rev. S. E Mercer, presiding Elder,
will preach, the League will conduct
all of the rest of the service-
It was decided, owing to the schoo 1
uorfc this week which is heavy or
soaae of the members, to postpone this
ueek*s m'ssion study class to next
week, holding two study periods next
weak instead of one, hows of meet
ing to be announced later. Every mem
ber is urged to he pttsent at the
e hutch next Sunday at 2:30 p m
promptly to reh earns far the Sunday
night service.—Christine Dodd.
SEVKNTY-FIVE PER CENT
OP PEANUT CROP ALREADY
MARRRTED AND SHIPPED
Nsarly 78 par cant of Ike peons'
crop of Martin county has already
been marketed and shipped and large
shipments are being made daily
Buyers say that the crop has been
(hort in weight, probably around I
per cent off and the lack of weight
eodpkd with the small yield has mad.
the peanut crop in thia eectien very
CHRISTMAS PROGRAM AND
BOX PARTY RVERETT SCHOOL
There will he a short Christmas
program at the Ewictts high school
tinimW night (Wednesday*. The
pragian will be followed by a box
party and the public ia cordially i»-
vitod ta attend both. A fat! evening
of entertainment is promised all
those who attend.
Miss Katharine White of Jamesvflle
wue a vis*»or in team Friday evening.
Mtan. John A. PhOpott, Boyd Right,
Pruce Wynne, Hash B. Anderson and
• riritor hoc yesterday.
THE ENTERPRISE
ROAD TO BE
OPENED NEXT
SATURDAY
Detouring and more detouring by
travelers from here to Rocky Mount
i.nd on into Spring Hope for the past
two years will end next Saturday when
the Everetts-Williams too link of N.
C. 90 will be opend for traAr lite
contractors have already been in
structed to clean ihia road off and
open it on the 20th. Barricades will
be taken down, and the road will be
open to the public that evening.
The opening up of this road com
pletes project 15S-B, Martin-Pit.
counties with the exception of the con
st ruction of shoulders to the road, but
this will not interfere with trsAc.
Work on this Route from here to
"h» Washington county line is now in
process am' when it is completed it
will affot'.l an improved road from
Columbia o Williamston and from
V'iillams'on to beyond Spring Hope
van? can go on hard surface.
CROSS-WORD MANIA
BREAKS UP HOMES
Neglected Wives sf t le*eland Said to
Plan Diverces From
Stricken Haahsads
Homes in Cleveland, Ohio are now
threatened by the cross-word puz
zles. The inne>eent little white and
black squares have fascinated so
many husbands that legal aid organ
izations are being swamped with re
quests to solve the enigma or to
start d'vorce proceedings.
This direful state of affairs was
i'uclos«d today by the manager of
one of the legal aid organizations,
who said that his oAce was receiving
tn average of ten letters a day from
wives who have to remain at home
tl.ese evenings just because their hus
bands are suffering from "crest -
word puszleitis."
All of the letters nineapmil In al
most every detail. One of them ia as
follows:
"We were happy until recently
Then my hus bund hers me absorbed
in cross-word puzzles. &iace thea he
has had no time even ta look st me
ci the children. He no more than
gets his hat off than it is cress-ward
puzzles
"If I talk to him he gets angry. If
wo do go out for the evening he takes
■1 marazinc or newspaper with him
■ nd it is a cross-word puzzle.
"Morning, noon and night it is
cross-word puzzles. It is breaking
up our home, for I have no time for
them, He will either have to give up
cross-word puzzles and spend some
time irKh-Mi family or I wiR obtain
n d'vorce. ** —New York Tim-*
Report the Opportuni
ties For Givinir
Christmas Cheer
We hav- been requested by several
f ear. people to establish a column
in which opportunities to lend Christ
cheer to those who otherwise would
not have any, should le listed by
i.umber and should tell what »ai
needed in t-ach ease.
This is the system used by the As
sociated Charities ia many places and
gives individuals the chance to attend
to them in person.
The two cases that are known by
us now, are:
No. 1. Basket for very aged colored
venaa,
No. 2. Basket fsr old crippled warn
611.,
If any one who knows of gay other
cases where something caa be done to
carry the Christmas spirit and cheer
•o the aged and the poor, will report
i' to The Enterprise, we wfll publish
'hem by number and then the names
«.f those who will accept the case*
FIREMEN TO MEET
NEXT THURSDAY NIGHT
Hie nvuhers of th» loeal fit le
psremen* are urged to meet next
Thursday night at 7:lb at the (Sty
Hall. The chief ia eeperMl urgud to
b* present and ea tim~
Mr. J. L Davenport af JaaerviDr
was in town today.
i'
Miss Bonner Gurganus will arrive
'might from North Carolina college.
Greensboro, to spend the holidays with
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George
Gurganus.
Friday in Wilson.
Mr. Robert Taylor spent yesterday
in Everetts attending to buabaaes.
Meears. Charles MeMey and Joe
Everett span* Monday m Roheraon
ville attending te business.
Mr. and Mrs. P JT. Pagan and little
daughter af Rocky Mount visited Mr.
tad Mrs. S. R. Biggs Sunday
Mr. J. T. McClavaa af Biulte was
to town yesterday.
\\ illianiston, Martin Coufity, North Carolina, Tuesday, December 16, 1924.
NOTED LABOR
LEADER DIES
IN TEXAS
Will be Buried Thursday
In Sleepy Hollow
Cemetery
The noted president of the A'tier i -
can Federation of Labor, Sir.iurl
Compcrs. diol in San A 'tonia, Tex ,
last Sat unlay. His body is en rouie
to New York where service-, will be
held Thursday at 9 a. m. Interment
will be iiuute in Sleep Hollow cemetery
of that city.
Samuel liompers will uo .lown a-:
one of the big men of the ajre. Far
fifty year, he was the recognised
l:.tor leader of America.
Beginning as a shoemaker at he
of ten, he was brought up in serv
ice Ise attended sch«o! only from the
a?* of 6 to !0 in En~!and. hK net?**
country. At th; aire »f H he
c:.me te America ami went in'o the
tirar nu.imfac'.urjiK trade. where he
organized a ur.ion amonsr c gar mak
ers. His leadership to other labor o»-
lonizations was carried and he soon
became president of the American
Federation of labor.
Few men of his time worked more
faithfully to crea'e a Rood feeling
between all clauses of people (he world
over than he did. lie was always on
the look out to see. not only that
labor was pioperly protecto.l bu. that
capital also should hare n fair deal
It is a singular thin* that a man
representing a: shiftless a thing as
* labor organization can lead it for
half a century ami yet be loved ami
'.r. »r k charged with "selling out."
One of Mr. Ccr.tpera' stront points
was to ~o ortr differences will an
adversary before striking, ami by this
policy, much good was accomplished
bath for labor and for capital.
WAREHOUSES
REPORT FOR
NOVEMBER
Following U a report of some of
the leading warehouses in North
Carolina for the month of November.
The report gives the number of pounds
sold during tha* month and the aver
aged price paid:
lbs. avg.2
Ahoskie 2.J6.562 $22 07
Farmville 1,528,462 34.36
t.oldsboro 454.126 24.11
Greenville 6,317,901 29.78
Kin.-'.on . 4.287,356 25 57
Pinetops 173,544 27.17
Koberw.nvdle 222,764 2».20
Rocky Mount 2,919,370 30.80
larboro ' 287,710 28.58
\Vish>n *1 r*i 522 209 25 32
WHiaia -!on 30.' - r .HB 29.U?
Wilson 10,6f1,'j13 S2.&S
Winston-Salem 134,481 26.81
The total for the State nii 62 372,-
173 pounds at an average of |iS H
The quality of offerings during No
vember has b en about an average
with less common grade and more
good tobacco. The eiop lias betn short
this season and warehousemen -ta e
»2»at there has been plenty of g>od
color, hut no body. Comments oi re
por s indicate that about '. w-tliinlt
of the crop has been marketed.
G'*»mc CaMcd Off; Mcrrv
Hill Failed to Arrive
The Merry Hill high schcol «|uir.*
which was scheduled to play the town
team here las; night did no: arrive-
Someliody said he expected their
lailur. to arrive was due to a "frame
up" or ' something being put over on
the Prof." who is coach of the Herry
f i ill team. One of the members of the
team hrving been delinquent in some
class duty, the professor would not
let him oat of the class room Ivt
Friday in time to get in a match game
which the boys had scheduled The
who'f t cam then failed to show np
I .ere las ni-ht to fill an appointment
that Ihe teacher had made.
MR. TAYLOR ACCEPTS A
POSITION WITH MARTIN
COL'NTY SAVINGS * TRI'ST
Mr. Raymond Taylor who has beef,
employed by Mr. K. B. Crawford in
his insurance office, will be with the
Martin County Savings and Trust
company, beginning January 1, 1925
Mr. Taylor take* a position in the
bookkeeping department which was
held by his brother, Mr. Howell Tay
lor, who left Sunday for Raleigh to
make his home-
Radio Set boras up, aee Sessom*.
Miss Emma Bell Harris will arrive
Friday from N C. callage to spend
the CfcriitMi holidays with her
pimMbar. Mrs. Jennie YandL
Messrs. Bfll Long and Julias Purvis
■pilit H—day ia Belhaven.
$198.00 SAVED WHEN
PEANUTS ARE
SENT BY BOAT
MESSRS. HASSELL AND FOWDEN
ARRANGE FOR BOAT TO GET
I FAM TS AT I P-RIVER POINT
Messrs. Hassell and Fowdjn, local
buyers have arranged with
t ffiouls of the North Carolina and
Baltimore Steamboat company o have
thf company's boat which has been
turning around at the Williamston
vharf on its trips up the Roanoke, to
ito in up 'o the Kainbow farm and
'.■ the Poplar Point landing and take
i"> j .•-nuts v,hich will be carried to
he !.\»rfo!k warehouses.
Cn h boat load of °i2UO bags there
will b* a -aving of SISB.OO in freight
rates the boat line carrying the pea
ruts tor nine cents less per bag than
the- railroads. This will mean a con
iiten-hle saving to the farmers who
«» I::!e quantities of peanuts and
will h • ;; welcome saving to the small
fasm-Ts 'his jear on account of the
h, r age of crops.
BASKET BALL NKXT
THURSDAY NIGHT
lia ket tail fans can 'ook forwin!
it, the fastest game of the season on
Thur-day night, the 18th, when the
Washington and Williamston town
teams m-'.«t, as both teams have the
determination to win. While they are
■ •lends socially, friendship ceases
\vh n they step in the court. In spite
Ji "i he fs -t that Washington is n
larger city than Williamston, ihe Wll
bamslon boys have always been able
to hold their end against the W'ash
inicton te.im and cl.-vetvly defeatetl
them hree times out of four last
eiscn, *ith a very close score. It
a nt be denied that Washington has
! "-onderful town team as well as
fchool teams, and part of this is
due 'o 'he support riven them by the
public. With everything in their favor
t'cesnt phase our boys and they are
j.nxious to get after them to prove
•c their spectators they are worthy of
their support.
Our team has won four games out
if Ave ami they lott the flfth one
cider a great handicap against
Ainni. There are more players than
have ever played on our town team
before. We have ten in number and
every man ran fight like demon*
v hen they are put in the game. Thin
the line up: Lyman Britt, center
and captain, John Henry Edwards,
center, Jule Purvis, right forward;
lon HaasaU, left forward; William
I!. Williams, right forward; Frank
Carctarphrn, left forward; Irving
Margolis, right guard; A brum Peel,
right guard; Raymond Taylor, left
ruard; Hugh B. Anderson, left guard;
lim r« ke, official referee; J ease Har
--11, oftcial score keeper; Charlie
*• us, ofVial time keeper.
IUkJ ra will understand that only
f.ve nun start the tramc but all
t«r. of here men are seen in action
.! every game.
In audi ion to this game on Thurs
day night, our school boys play the
Lverett# school team. The last time
..ie.se two teams met it was the pret
tiest game that .spectators ever wit
rt&sed, ending wih a score of seven
teen ar.d fifteen in favor of Everetts.
!,o tlos- a score makes our boys de
ermiiud to win the next gam", while
the Everetts boys feel determined to
!•:>.-m with a larger score. It will
u; decided later whether this game
Thursday night will count in the
l.&rnpienship of the .school teams.
1 |Ja« will be lef« with Mr. Ricks and
Mr. I Hllip--, who repre sent the two
team-* While these two games will be
played for th benefit of the Episcopal
church, we thank Mr. Phillips and
Mr. Ricks for considering us and let
ling their boy* play Thursday night.
Dont forget that the whole com
munity is invited to be there Thursday
right ami when you have purchased
«ne of the tickets from the ladies
who «:» selling them, you are get
ting vain* received for your money,
'wo hours of basket ball playing, the
Scenes' athletic sport th&t has ever
been offered to the American public
This amusement guaranteed to
n ee* v.-i' h your approval. First gam"
starts promptly at 8 o'clock
W. T. STONE, for the suc
cess of the boys.
GLORIA SW ANSON IN " THE
HUmiINC BIRD" PLEASES
-
"The Humming Bird", a picture
of wonderful scenes and of in'-ense in
I) mi was *etx at the Strand theatre
by most 200 peopl v The picture
proved to be one of Gloria Swanson's
best pictures an.l, in oar estimation,
far surpassing "ZaTta" another of
Mias Swanson's pictures.
This is Paramount week at the
Strand an-1 exceptionally good pictures
BOY'S LIFE IS
THREATENED BY
BEAUFORT MAN
Forces Boy to Drink and
Then Demands A
Cigarette or Life
Jasper Ayers, a young white man
from Beaufort county, forced the
old tlieory of give and r-ceive last
Su'iday when he met up with a yount.
boy on a road in the Smithwick's
cieek section.
The ten vear-old son of Mr. Chas
M. Peel was walking a road in that
section when he was overtaken by
Ayers who was riding a bicycle.
Ayears dismoun'ed and invited the
hoy to take a drink, which the younK
ster refused to do. I'pon refusal to
drink made by the boy. Ayers caught
him ami forced it down his throat.
Then Ayers demanded a cigarett from
the Peel boy who told him he had
no cigarettes. He was th.-n told by
Ayers if he did not give him a cirt/r
--r-tte he would kill him. making ltSo*Yi'
'hat he hud a pistol in his pocket.
The little boy. resorting to the
best method of escaping death, told
his assaiant that he would give him
some money to buy him cigarettes
with if he would no* kill him. Tlie
suggestion must have been accepted
by Ayers, for when the buy produced
his pocket book, containing a small
amount of change, Ayers seized it
and rode away.
Several neighbors soon heard of
the affair and set out to find Ayers
They over'ook him. placed him under
arrest andTvturtklM him over to deputy
sheriff IJuther Peel who |4aced hlr.i
n jail here.
Ayers claims he was just playing
end also that he is not strong minded.
As to these claims, we do not know
whether there is any truth in it or
pot. Pouring liquor down the throats
of small boys by force and then rob
bing them of their money is not to
be tolerated.
LOCAL SCHOOL
HONOR ROIaL
FOR NOVEMBER
The following is the honor roll for
Ihe local school for the month of
November:
First grade: Billy Griffin, John Gut
l.anus, Noah Gurganus, Robert Gur
ganus, Murry W. Holloman. John F
Pope, Lawrence Lindsley. Mike Katter
Harry Stubbs, Geroge lee Robersoi;.
Frances Barnhill, Alta Critcher. Leva
Mae Glenn, Henry Gurganus, Marie
Hardison, Alice Harrison, Blanche. M.
Harrison, Elizabeth Howard, Chris
tine Jenkins, Grace Manning, Mary
Robertson, Hannah V. Everett-
Second rrade: Alma Shirley, Roger
Critcher, Warren Roebuck. Euielui
Hardison, Mayo Hardkon, Clarence
McKeel, Ada Bullock, Jack Manning,
Tdllie ('lark, Mat'ie Gurganus. Nell
Hardison James T. Barnhill. Oscar
Anderson jr., Jo.-ephine Anderson,
liillie Pope, Herbert Whitl-y, Alver
eta Weaver, Dorru Teel, Shelton Hall,
Annie Wynne, At wood Gurganus,
liruce Holloman, Horace Ray. Ruth
Price, Hubert Che-ry, Vernon Godwin,
James W. Dixoa. Hardy Rose.
Third grade: Myrtle Brown, Billie
Liverman, Clayton McKeel. Virginia
G. Taylor.
Grad - four B: Jim Rhodes, jr., Reg.
Simpson, Ruth Ward, Mary C. Wil
liams.
Grad.' four A: Wheeler M. Mannii.g.
Ernest Harrison.
Fifth grade: Hazel Brown, Edith
Peele, Charles Manning, Albert L.
Clark. —i..
Sixth Charlie 1 to wen. Mary
Alice Dunning, Norma Perry, Ollie
Marie Roberson, Buck SauiMlers,
Ralph Taylor, Josephine Harrison
Seventh grade: Margaret
Hibble liverman, Elmer Peele, Ed
win Peele, Mary Carstarphen.
Eleventh grsale, Margaret Manning,
I .aura Orleans, Benjamin Courtney.
Oak City Team Wins -
Over Everetts Five
On Friday afternoon. Oak City
met Everetts on the local court in a
contest which was rather close during
the ftrst half. The feature of the
game was the team work of the
visitors who presented a very smooth
working team.
' Oak City won the guu because of
the ability of its forwards to shoot
However there was no sign of
team work on the part of the local
boys, but on the contrary the work
cf two individuals.
Oak City, Dee. 15.—Everatts high
school loses to Oak Qty by a ante
J 22 to 10.
' Mayor Hassell wad Messrs. Harold 1
Everett and W. V. Pool visited friends
in Aprahoe Sunday.
! WILLI AMSTON
LEADS MANY
SMALL MARKETS
Tie report of the I . S. ami X. C.
Departments of Agriculture h«vs
that Wiliiam>tun stands ahead of al!
the >maller markets in the State
with the exception of Farmville which
ij p.imarily a tobacco town in the
near, of & tobacco growinc terri
tory
Ti ?rr are only four nvrkrt- ahead
of \ and ('.n-ennllc'.- a*?r
rjte '*! only .09 above Williams* on
ieav lie only three that have a ipa
t*rinl standing over the local market.
F> nn the figurvs of thf report it
will be seen that 1 he o : her two towns
with the exception of Firmvillf are
Wil on and Rocky Mount and to com
!«ari the smaller markets, one has to
tak« into considers: H-r he amou-i*. of
toU -co that is sol*l on those markets
» hict is shippsl in l?rw iiuantities.
.An*' the tnhrcru that is shipped is
usuillv of ilie better irra.le Iwjuse
ro tne will take the trouble or the
time to ui e\eu very poor
era !es of tobacco *o a larper market
wh n on.» can ».ik" it t« a r»ar by
market.
V illinmston aivi Martin county
arc proud of the tolxacco markets
I ha' have been run in 'he county this
year and th-y will work for the vl
varoement of the market next year
Ivor- than ever before.
ENGAGEMENT
ANNOUNCED
Pelhaven. N. C. Dec. IV— ML- - Lit*
Sawyer entertained the la. \»
pasas club TiH-s.lay evening in com
11i. lent. to one of the season's most
po,*ulaf ami attractive briiie «-ec»«.
Mi-.i Sophornia Toppine The
were attractively decorated wi'h
Christmas evergreens. With th» le
l«c ous ice course served. by the Vw
t*f .. the guests were presented Aitli
sn: til satin bats „f r ice. beari".: this
in. cription:
TP
IVcember 'X. 1924
thus anouncing Miss Topping's ap
I reaching marriage to Mr Julius
Purvis of Williamston. N C. After
Ih* refreshments, the brtiie to he was
presented with the eed of a satin
r L'MJII Ii D !i>!d >o pull lk>in i> she
»n bid, she soon found herself show
en.l with many u-eful cwkmt uten
sils, which wore rifts of the club
n« mb-Ts.
Kxcludmg the truest of honor. those
present were llksrs Rachel Itishop.
M idled lidin-on, Ij'ellf Crawford.
Julia Rowe, Kuth Campbell, Mabel
anl Katie Topping. Alameta Sawyer.
Mary King Ellison. Elizabeth Wilher-
FM.
> _____
The above announcement will prove
to be very interesting to the many
friends of the contracting: parties.
Mi*. 'Purvis having lived near ami in
Williamston for the past several years
Miss Tupping was a popular member
«.f th-> Lveretts school facwl y in l>Ki
IK4 and has many friends in tha" sec
ti« n of the county.
Martin County Man-
Heads Nashville
Kiwanis Club
At a meeting held last week to or
ganise a Kiwanis club in the enter-
I rising town Nashville, a former Mar
tin county citiseu, Mr. Harry Pagan
was i-iecied president of the on aniaa
titn
The Nashville Graphic says. "*ilV
ij the nest few week- Prrsadent Pag
an hopes to have the organisation in
fine working shape and funciomng in
the interest of Nashville's social, re
ligion* and financial upbuilding to that
citer.l a.s will mak ■ Kiwan-s an im
frrtoiit factor in the accomplishment
of many things now needed for the
town and community.**
Mr. Fagan holds a responsible po
sition in a N*-«hvill-» bank and is one
of that city's most enterprising young
citisens-
Schools Close Friday
• For The Holidays
The local schools win Has; Friday
fir the Christmas kililry* ami will
not reopen until Moiday the Stk of
January. This will give the students
a much needed rest of two weeks and
bring them hack oa the Mh of a
new year all prepared to meet tha
lard assignments that an snre to
come before anoth-r holiday rails a
ronnd
While tha lacnl ackaal rfa«s Fri
tky far » twa marks wtntiw. there
are others that wi| Hear aaly far *
Give him a pair of taller Aitw
' tht kind that d»l|HI Hard war*
ADVERTISERS WILL FIND OUR
COLUMNS A LATCHKEY TO ICM
HOMES OF MARTIN COLNTT.
ESTABLISHED 1898
BIG PAYMENTS
FOR COTTON COOPS
Mailt* of  heck. Will Begin TWay
And Is Expected la Be Com
pleted by Dec. 2®. .
Kaleijfh, Dec 15.—During the six
t'ays following December 16, checks
aKKTejratinK approximately one and .
half million dollars will be mailed to
members of the North Carolina Cotton
(Growers' Association from the iceneia!
 ffice of the association in Raleigh.
These checks represent the> first di -
'rihution on cotton of the 1924 crop
ieliverel to the association. The mai"
in* of the checks will beyin Mondr.
«nd the office force expects to com
I lete the work not later than Decem
ber 20 Fanners living in about si*»y
counties in this state will receive
t'tese checks and the distribution of
this money at this time will likely
mean ihe settlement of many account -
i r.d in like manner tend to brim; con
siderable business to the m-rchan'*
HIMI bankers of the cotton section.
Member-; of the association wno
l ive delivered cotton to the associa
tion Will receive distribution checks or
jll cotton on which the drafts reach
ed the Kaleiifh office prior to Decern-
t-er 1. Cotton delivered in IVcember
v.-ill be evrn.Hl up in January. Na'ur
ally the office force hal to set a date
for the .i-munting ami hence the an
nouncement.
For scvei al weeks the weather '»as
leen particularly well suited to 'he
I i-king of the crop and the south* rn
section has gathered practically all
the crop of cotton, but in the north
eastern section, with a later season,
the farmers are still busy picking and
ginning.
The receipts of cotton by the associ
ation continue ti) hold up well th?
prospect is that North Carolina as
sociation will handle a much larger
percentage of the crop this season
than was received last year. It seem.*
elso that the North Carolina associ
ation is likely to handle a larger per
cen'age of the crop than oiher cotton
ions
Without any membership tam-
I aign, cotton farmers are sign r;
c»ntrac'.s right along ami the mem
bership of the association is stea hlv
"lowint '
MISS MARGARET A
HARDISON DEAD
M iss Margaret A. Hardison of
Griffin's 'ownship died last Sunday :■!-
ternoon from an attack of pneunK>:>"a
» ith which she was taken only time
days before her death. *
Miss liaidison was 81 ySin -.il,
the daughter of the late l*avkl li:
son aid wife, Apha Hardison Shs
leaves one brother, Mr. W. A. Hardi
son an. I a large number of nepl -"•*
a tid nieces.
She was buried at the Hardsell
Mill cemetery yesterday afternoon.
Double Wedding
Sunday Afternoon
Cupid -vas busy around six o'c! --k
Sunday aftetnoon in our city. TV
Register of Deeds, Se.m Getsinger.
is.-ued licenses for Mr. Robert Stalls
£nd Miss Lillian Gurganus and Miss
I'annk Claud and Mr. W. H. Rober
son, all parties being residents of the
Cross Koads and Kobersonville sec-
The contracting parties then went
iu the Itaptist parsonage where at &ix
oclock they were married by Rev.
R I. Shirley.
ENTERTAIN FRIDAY EVENING
Mr. ami Mrs. J. G. Godard, and Mr.
ur.d Mrs. Orcrir Anderson entertained
at tMe Godanl home in New Town
las' Friday evning from 8:30 to 12
The home was effectively decorated
with holly, pin :s ami haw berries, the
Christmas idea hfinj carried out in
the decorations.
I'pon the arrival of the |Witi
punch was served from one side of
the dining hall and Inter in the even
ing delicious refreshments of cMtken
salad and pimento sandwiches, rheeie
Saratoga chips, pickles, eekry were
served, from the dining table
Dancing find cards were enjoyed
curing the evening.
Those invited were Mr. and Mrs.
IL B. Crawford/Mr. and Mrs. C. H.
Godwin, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Skate.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Saunders, Mr. Nad
Mrs. John Manning, f Mr. and Mia.
A_ R. Dunning, Mr. ami Mrs. Wheeler
Martin. Mr. and Mrs. Elbert M.
Dr. and Mrs. P. B. Caw, Mr. and
Mrs. 8. Rome Biggs, Mr. and Mrs.
P. H. Brown. Mrs. Carrie B. WOkuns.
Mrs. Delhi Carson. Miss Annie Craw
ford and M—in. 1. L. HasseU. J. &
Peel, W. F. Thomas, W. V. Pad and
Hi T. Warn. Harry Biggs, Bflf
"
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