North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
POOR PROSPECT
FOR GROWERS OF
LOWLY PEANUTS
• "" —• — . I
Outlook For Profit This
Year Even Worse Than
Year Ago
♦
Though many peanut growers of
/North Carolina use,d little cash outlay
in producing the crop of 1931, a bump
er crop was produced because of the
favorable season. 1 It was stated in the
crop outlook report last year that the
piospcct for prices-was poor and such I
was the case. The outlook for profit
this year is even worse than it was
last year.
"In spite of little fertilizer being
used and in spite of the small cash j
outlay with the peanut crop of 1931, 1
ideal growing weather helped to pro-'
duce a bumper crop," says R. 11. Rog
ers, associate economist at the North j
Carolina State College. "The forecast
made as to possible low prices proved
correct, and low prices were offered j~
at the beginning of the last harvest- |
ing season. Since tlicii the price de- •
dined steadily, and in January of 1932 J
was the lowest experienced in 3 year's i
Many growers would not pick 1 and *
bag the peanuts after having them I
dug, and some who had not dug per
mitted the nuts to remain in the
ground." " I
Farm finances arc more stringent
now than one year ago. Little fer
tilizer-can be bought. There is a
bumper crop now in the markets, and
tlie carry-over will likely be large, ,
Rogers says. Nor does "lie look for
growing conditions to be as ideal this .
year as they were la>t year. 1- wo ,
good crops can hardly be made two
years in succession without fertilizer.
All of which points to a poor outlook
for the crop this season, he advises.!
He advises growers t> use the nuts ' ,|
for producing jK-anut-fed hogs or to ,
plant corn instead and feed out hogs (
for the regular packer market. It is j
unwise to think of substituting some!
other cash nop like cotton, tobacco, |
or. Irish potatoes, for these are all
faced with poor sailing through the
stormy year of 1932.
• '
Messrs. N. C. (ircen, Jesse Melson h
and Herman Smith are attending a'
meeting of Ford dealers and service t>
men'in Washington tody. b
100 MULES and HORSES
at our stables in Greenville on con
signment. Must be sold at once.
Prices are very reasonable. Now is
your time to buy.- v
R. L. SMITH
STABLES GREENVILLE, N. C.
Burt Oats
Arrived
Will be Sold Cheap
Before buying your oats, fertilizers, '
or feeds, come to see us. We can save
you money.
;
Lindsley Ice Co.
WILLIAMSTON, N. C.
Bertie Man Puts
To Work Gleaning Up Farm
(Bertie Ledger-Advance)
It it probable that cleared land
may be bought under present con
ditions at lower cost than clearing
up new ground already held in
one's name, T. E. Alston, promi
nent farmer of near Windsor,
thinks, but in order to give em
ployment to those who need work
and have no myans of supporting
themselves he has kept a number
of men in his neighborhood busy
during the past several weeks in
clearing up new lands for him,
paying them in provisions.
He believes this method might
Farmers With Feed,
Stock, Not Worried
HOG AND HOMINY
PROGRAM DOING
WELLATWENONA
Experiments Recently Con
ducted Show Value of
Such Programs
Wenona.—r*'lt seems that in time of
depression, such as we are now ex
periencing, the farmer with feed and
livcj-toek is not worrying much about
how he will pull through the winter
and.operate another year in Washing
lon Comity," Fred F. Miller, chief of
lite'.Test Farm Division of the North
t ari'lina Department of Agriculture,
declared in an address recently about
lb * Wetiuna BJackland 'l'tst Farm.
" I lie experiments with beef cattle,
ln>gs, sheep, corn, soybeans, and pas
lure- show that this program is with
iut doubt the most profitable plan for
the farmers to follow in the large
(lackland region of. Eastern North
arolina. J. 1.. Rea, superintendent
>f the farm, i> getting fine results from
ii> hog and hominy program.
Pasture experiments slipw that red
top and blue grass succeed best in the
blackland; also that native reeds fur-
publish so ivnr
—| TVytJOAY^MC^JIIDAJ^
be pot to use by a number of oth
er fanners to help relieve unem
ployment of farm labor in this
section. If, instead of supportnig
the men who are without provi
sions or turning them, they are put
to work doing odd jobs, cleaning
ditches, clearing new ground,
making other needed improve
ments on the farms and proviaions
exchanged for their labor sur
pluses will be reduced, much need
ed work done, and the distress re
lieved, is Mr. Alston's idea. He
believes giving honest employ
ment to men willing to work Ms ~
the best sort of charity.
\ PRECOCIOUS CALF 1
v 1
Scuppernong.—A heifer calf that
gave milk at 11 monthi old ia the
property of John W. Spruill near
here. The calf it atill nursing its
mother. The animal give* a lit
tle less than a quart of milk daily.
Mr. Spruill noticed the enlarged
udder and found upon examina
tion that the calf waa giving milk.
nish K«od grazing during the period
between May and January. During
this eight "months period, 20 native
cows made an average gain of 67
pounds with no feed other than reeds.
"The hog feeding experiments show
that a mixture of equal parts, by
weight, of cotton seed nieal, fish meal,
and soy . bean meal is the most profit
able protein supplement to corn from
the standpoint of both gains in weight
and costs.
I "In the fertilizer and lime tests with
corn and soybeans in a Jwo-year ro
tation, potash alone seems to be the
t best fertilizer for both crops on the
| blacklands, and finely ground lime-
J stone is slightly better than hydrated
| lime or marl, although the use of lime
in any form in all cases has materially
! increased yields on this station," con
j eluded Mr. Miller.
England produces only sufficient
j food to feed one-third of her popula
tion.
WANTS
FOR SALE: 8 OR 10 WHITE
giant cockerels. $1.50 each. Will
weigh Bor 9 pounds. Mrs. L. J. Har
dison, Williamston, N. C., R. R 1).
No. 4.
FOR RENT: 6-ROOM HOUSE,
in New Town. ,\Vater, lights, etc.
Good neighbors. Herman Bowen.
fS 2t
FOR SALE: RING-NECKED'
pheasants, $5 per pair; pecans, 20
■cents per pound. Mrs. Jim Staton. |
f9 2t * I
STOLEN: SMALL WHITE SET
ter, with brown spots on ears. An
swers to name "Frank." Reward for
return. John W. Green. It
FOR RENT: ONE GARAGE, $3.30
per month; offices, two for $lO per
month; apartments, at reduced prices.
Mrs. Jim Staton. f9 2t
CABBAGE PLANTS FOR SALS:
Karly Jersey Wakefield Cabbage
Plants. Obtained from the very best
seed. 15 cents per 100. H. C. Green,
Pecan Grove Farm, Williamston, N.
C. f-5-12-19-^
INDIGESTION
"My work 1b confining,
and often I eat hurriedly,
causing mo to have Indi
gestion. Oas win form
and I will smother and
have pains In my chest.
"I had to be careful
what I ate, but after
someone had recom
mended Black-Draught
and I found a small
pinch after meals was bo
helpful, I soon was eat
ing anything I wanted.
"Now when I feel the
least smothering or un
comfortable bloating, I
take a pinch of Black-
Draught and get relief."
—Cljrd. Vaughn, 1* Shlppy St.
Orwnvlll*. a C
Sold In , Msa
| WOMEN who uw run-down. Mr- 1
THE ENTERPRISE
LOOK OUT 30R FRANKENSTEIN!
■• x k
Hfl K ; I
Hk'
181
■BBBk: :. v^vmmhBBBBIH
OOQ.I? KArRLOrr M ,., tr>>
Boris Karloff as the Monster in "Frankenstein," the most famous Mys
tery play of the year, which will play at the Turnage Theatre at Washington
matinee and night, February 15 and 16. Packed to the brim with thrills and
called by experts the most original film ever to reach the screen.
eerie "Frankenstein," will make its debut at the Washington Theatre next
Monday.—adv.
'COUNTY BOARD
|OF BERTIE URGES
SPECIAL SESSION
Want Law To Permit Post
ponement of Tax Sales
Until Next Fall
——•
Windsor.—A resolution 'calling up
on Governor Gardner to convene the
General Assembly in special session to
enact legislation to prevent thof sale
of homes and farms for taxes that can
• | not he collected and can not be paid
j was unanimously adopted by the
county commissioners regular
j monthly meeting here last week,
j Motion for drafting the resolution
j and forwarding it to Governor (Jard
' ner was made by Commissioner J. T.
'Stokes, second by M. E. Evans and
unanimously accepted. 1.. S. Mizelle, j
j clerk to the board, was authorized to
draft the resolution.
This resolution was followed by an
other motion, made also by Commis
sioner Stokes, that the schools of the
county be suspended at the conclusion
jof the six months term unless suffic
jient taxes to pay the expenses of them
jliad been collected. The motion was
ladopted with Commissioners Stokes, j
| Parker, and Evans voting favorably, i
| Chairman Lacy M. Early and Com-1
jniissioner Phelps objected to the mo
tion as being without the jurisdiction!
jof the commissioners and assuming'
| authority belonging to the board of
I education and the school districts, they
| declining to vote on the motion on
.that ground.
County Superinendent of Schools 11.
|W. Early called the attention of the
board to their lack of authority in the
matter, and protested the board's ac
tion. He had appeared before \thc
commissioners at their request to out
line the school situation. He explained
that the teachers had agreed to wait
upon collection of taxes for their pay,
I'll Tell You Free
How to Heal
Bad Legs;
Simply anoint the swollen veins and I
sores with Emerald Oil, and bandage i
your leg. Use a bandage three inches 1
wide and long enough to give the
necessary support, winding it upward
from the ankle to the knee, the way
the blood flows in the veins. No;
more broken veins. No more ulcers,
or open sores. No more crippling
pain. Just follow directions and you
are sure to be helped. Clark's Drug
Store, Inc., won't keep your money
unless you are.
BY ALL MEANS, HAVE YOUR
PROPERTY INSURED!
• We Insure Anything—'Large or Small —Against
Fire and Theft
J. E. POPE
; OFFICE PHONE 10 RESIDENCE 18
WILLIAMSTON
JjCgIKAJOIWA^
Local All Stars Lose To
College Team Wednesday
♦
Williarnston's All-Stars, playing
their first game of the season, lost to
East Carolina Teachers' College quint
here last Wednesday night by a 20 to
16 score. Cherry, former star on the
Everetts school team, led the scoring
for the locals, Tucker leading the scar
ing for the visitors. The E. C. T. C,
boys made mqje than half of their
points from the free-throw line.
stating that no obligations would be
placed on the county other than the
collection of taxes already levied by
the school districts.
It was later announced by the sup
erintendent of schools that the order]
of the county commissioners would be
ignored by his in view of j
the fact that arrangements had already 1
been made with teachers to continue
operation of the full term.
Tailored to Measure!
ALL WOOL SUIT
$17.50
yOU can't judge this remark
able value on the baaia of
price alone. Men who have been
accuatomed to paying $22.50 to
$25 for their clothes tell me these
Homeland all-wool fabrica are
every bit as fine. And remem
ber—they're made to meaaure,
too. Homeland's tremendous
buying power—wholesale tail
oring methods—and direct aell
ing account for the saving*. You
don't have to apend more for
real tailoring value than $17.50.
Let me come back and prove it— i
at your convenience. Drop me
a line—you won't be obligated
in the leaat. Here'a my name
and address:
Robert K. ;
Adkins
PHONE 1U
Robersonville, North Carolina
Homicides Drop in State;
Suicides Show Increase
♦
Raleigh.—Homicides decreased in
North Carolina in 1931, but suicides
hit the upward trail. During the year
329 persons were killed by others and
305 took their own lives, according to
the yearly mortality statistics released
'■ by the state board of health.
' The figures compared with 347 hom
icides and 281 suicides in the state in
1930.
| Lightning in 1931 struck oftener j
than in 1930, bolts from'the sky tak- 1
ing 34 lives last year, as compared
to 15 such fatalities in the preceding |
12 months.
; Airplane fatalities were four, the\
same as in 1930.
Rail accidents took 7L'lives, ope i
less than in the previous year. Con- j
flagration and accidental burns last
year killed 227 and automobile mis- '
haps, the greatest agency of violent
death, reaped a harvest of 638 lives,
'seven more than 1930, according to the
health department's statistics.
| More than 15,000 schools through
out the States have adopted
the American School Savings Bank
system.
FEBRUARY SPECIAL
Finger Wave 50c
Facial and Arch 91.00
Ladies' Hair Cut 35c
Hot Oil Treatment 75c
Marcel ....... . . . 50c
Children's Hair Cut 25c
Realistic Permaflent Wave (com
plete) SB.OO
Eugene Permanent Wave (Com- I
plete) $6.00
Our Special Permanent Wave
(Complete) $3.50
We urge yciu to take advantage
of these low prices while the Spec- J
ial is in effect. Phone or call in !
person for appointment.
STEVENSON'S,
BEAUTY SHOP
WASHINGTON, N. C.
CAN HUMAN LIFE BE CREATED?
W vT
✓ Vr"
H t.t J jp* fHjS
HBS^w
Turnage Theatre
WASHINGTON, N. C.
Monday and Tuesday, February 15 and 16
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES
MatinN: 10 and 25 cant. * Ni«hts: 10 and 40 cant.
Poor Show. Daily 2, 4, 7, and »
■*«■* Wednesday and Thursday
Jackie CBbper and Robert Coogan in "SOOKY"
Friday. February 12,1932
Junior Order Members
Enjoy Oyster Roast Here
Local members of the Junior Order
United American Mechanics enjoyed
an oyster roast here last night with
Past State Councillor Edgar Harris,
Tarboro, and a few other visitors
as special guests.
following the supper, the Juniors
.witnessed a picture showing the ac
tivities of Junior organizations in
cluding the orphanage in this State.
Mount Rainier, Md., with a popu
lation of 3.832 persons claims to be
the only town in the United States
without a gasoline filling station.
GARDEN
SEED
Sold in either pack
ages or by weight.
We Carry the Famous
T. W. WOOD
SEEDS
There are none bet
ter than Wood's. Come
to our store for your
•seed supply.
W.J.Hodges
    

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