North Carolina Newspapers

    THE FRANKLIN 0 PRESS
FridayMay 16, 1024
Page Two
ficd by the Court be .transmitted to
lhc family of. the deceased Brother
Lawyer, and copies furnished to the
newspapers of this District. r
Respectfully submitted,
LASSIE KELLY, .
J, FRANK KAY, JR.,
CEO. 13. PATTON,
T. FRANK RAY, SR.,
' (ilLM'l'R A. JONES,
G. L. JONES,
A. W: HORN,
' " ' HENRY G. ROBERTSON.
R. D. SISK.
. . T. J. JOHNSTON.
The resolutions' above were of
..fered by A. VV. Horn, and upon mo
tion of G. L. Jones, and seconded by
R. D. Sisk, was unanimously adopted.
The Chairman, Mr. Robertson, or
dered that the resolutions be trans
mitted to the Clerk, of the Superior
Court of Macon County, North Caro
lina, for recording, a copy to the
family of the deceased and a copy to
the Franklin . Press, and Asheville
Citizen for publication.
HENRY G. ROBERTSON, Chmn.
. J. FRANK RAY, JR., Secretary.
It is ordered by the Court that the
Resolutions and minutes of the Lai
Meeting be recorded in the Minute
Docket.. P. A. McELROY,
" Judge Presiding,
North Carolina Macon County.
I, Frank I. Murray, Clerjv of the
Superior Court '..of Macon County,
hereby certify that the foregoing s a
true, correct, and perfect copy' of the
Memorial Services in honor of Hon
orable F. S. Johnston, as shown by
the Minutes' of Superior Court of Ma
con County. Witness my hand and
seal, this the 8th day-of May, 1924.
;, FRANK I. MURRAY,
Clerk Superior Court, Macon Coun
ty, North Carolina.
Upper Cartoogechaye News.
Most of the farmers in this section
have nearly finished planting corn.
Mr. Harrison Bates, of Skeenah,
passed through this section Sunday
on his way to Buck Creek.
:. Mr. Zeb Anderson left Monday for
Buck Creek.
' Mrs. Carolina Elliott, of. .Teresita,
is spending a few days with friends
and relatives here.
Mr. Lester Dills, of Skeenah, was
visiting this section Sunday.
Mr. Harlie Huscusson and son Les
ter, of Shooting Creek, were visiting
in this section the week end. .
Mr. Joe Blaine, of Pots Branch,
spent a few days with Mr. Hez Dills
the past week.
The Sunday School is progessing
nicely under the leadership of Mr.
Henry Greenwood.
Messrs. Jesse Guffie and Nealous
Huscussop. left last week for Rich
Mountain. .
Mr, Ed Passmore, of Nantahala.
was a business visitor in this section
a' few days ago. v
Mr. Chas. Rhodes, of Teresita.
passed through this section Monday.
Mr. Charlie Slagle, of Lower Car
toogechaye, passed through this sec
tion Monday.
We are glad to see Mr. L. D. Dills
out again.
Mr. Charlie Dills was visiting his
. neighbors on the creek Sunday.
Mr. Will Anderson made a business
trip to Lower Cartoogechaye last J
'Monday.
Mr. Albert . Greenwood, of Poplar
Cove, was visiting in this section
Sunday.
Miss Annie Anderson is spending
a few days with home folks.
Everybody come to Sunday School
: next Sunday. R. P. B.
Going! Going! ..'
There is still a chance to act before
the summer falls. When the auction
eer cries "Going! Going!" he soon fol
lows with the barfg of the hammer
and the final word "Gone!"
Every farmer should plan to grow
enough feed to carry his stock and his
cattle through next winter. The time
to plan for and plant, for this feed is
Going! Going!
Before it is too late get in all the
feed crops possible.' Use all available
6pace and plant feed crops.
This has been a long, hard winter
for the man who had cattle to feed
and many a farmer has seen his sup
ply of feed dwindle down to nothing.
Many a farmer has had to buy hulls
and hay, at high prices, to carry his
stock through till pasture came.
When we buy roughness we can say
"Good Bye" to the profits in the beef
cattle or the dairy business. Before
it is too ate. plan for next winter.
There is always a good market for
hay, straw or roughness if you have
more than you need when next March
comes around.
Many fields of clover, on which the
owners were depending for hay this
'summer, were frozen out last winter.
It is therefore all the more necessary
t grow extra feed crops. Soy beans
and cane will turn off a large tonnage
of valuable feed. Cane seems to be
growing in favor. Many of the dairy
men are stating that cane cultivated
in rows like corn and thes stacked in
the fall returns more feed than any
other crop. ,
- Plan for and plant for enough feed
to carry all your stock through next
winter. Farmers' Federation News.
SEED POTATOES
. IN THE GROUND
The two carloads of Certified Irish
Cobbler seed potatoes, of the famous
Prince Edward Island strain, are sold
out clean. These twelve hundred
bushels, together with the certified
seed raised in Buncombe and Hender
son last year, should give us a strong
start in the certified seed potato busi
ness. These potatoes arc now in the
giound. Our success will depend on
the faithfulness and care with which
the growers cutivate and dust them.
Every dusting counts but remember
that the fifth diisting counts more
than . all the rest of the operations
Every extra day that the.plants can
be kept green at the end of the season
means extra ield. Remember this
and get in your dustings or sprayings
every ten days surely. Do not let the
rush of work or wet weather prevent'
regular: dusting, because if yous get
behind 'on the first or second dusting
you will not be able to get five dust
ings in before the vines have wilted.
The seed potato business promises
to become "'a big industry for this sec
tion. Its success will depend on the
faithfulness and care of the growers
this year. Farmers Federation News.
Goose Holler Iter?i3c
Anothe'r year has come and -gone,
and the voice of the turtle is heard in
the land, and another sign that spring
has-come, Js that the foot-tuby and
gunny-sack foot-towel again adoru
the back porches of Goose Holler's
frugal homes, and hanging above the
tub and - towel may. be seen a long,
keen hickory sprout, as a gentle re
minder ior the youth of the house
hold to put said tub. and towel to
their proper use, before seeking their
place of repose, or else the use to
which the said sprout was assigned
would be impressed upon them in a
more forcible way.
They've gone and got them a new
preacher down here at. Luke-Warm
Church, one whose heart is full of
what we call the old-time religion
He preaches the Gospel, the whole
Gospel, and nothing but the Gospel,
and he's not afraid he's going to say
something or 'nother that some of
them won t like. I think he s jist
about sich a preacher as Paul and
Silas . Baranbus used to, be and you
know they was both better preachers
than most of these college graduates'.
for they preached with' the spirit and
the understanding, and .this preacher
they've got down at Luke-Warm
Church has got so much more re
ligion, than most of the people in
this neck of woods, that even his
own church members say he's going
crazy on the subject of religion. It
seems kind of strange to me, that
every time a preacher gets in dead
earnest, and talks like he meant what
he said, and will practice what he
preaches, that people will say he's
studied, preached and talked religion
so long and hard that he's losing his
mind and they think he oughtn't to
be allowed to preach no longer. But
a political speaker can ramp and rave,
throw his arms around like a pair of
winding-blades, till he turns black in
the face,--and get so excited that he'll
holler loud enough to be heard a mile,
and the audience will cheer, and hoi
ler, and get as excited as he is. But
nobody ain't a going to accuse him
of being weak minded. No sir. He's
one of the most intelligent and best
informed men they ever saw. Re
ligion don't seem to live and grow in
Goose Holler now like it did SO years
ago. In those days I knew men and
women who wouldn't only talk re
ligion, hut would act like they had
the genuine ' article, and wasn't
ashamed of it, and nobody didn't ac
cuse them of being crazy neither, and
it hasn't been more than . 50 years
since there's men and women right
here in Goose Holler who'd keep the
Sabbath, too. They'd not shave,
black shoes or visit much on Sunday,
and would only read their Bible,
and religious books and papers on
Sunday, and in them days there's
men who thought more of ther re
ligion than they did of their money,
and they was men of jist as good
common sense as the people of. to
day, and if the young and rising gen
eration don't believe it, jist let them
come down here in Goose Holler and
they can find old men who will testi
fy to the fact,, a man don't have to
have no brains in his head before he
can have religion in his heart, and the
men that have most of both, are the
men who make the world better for
having lived in it.
.-..', JESS NONSENSE.
Body Like a Motor.
If it were possible to cnclos man
so' that whie he Could breathe, no
heat could escape from his body, he
would die quickly. . ,
Such is the result of a test con
ducted recently by Dr. T. H. Read, of
the Department of the Interior and F
C. Houghton of the American Society
ot ventilating engineers.
They say that the body is only an
internal combustion engine, and, like
all other engines of this type, must be
cooiea to tunction properly, kvapora
tion of sweat is the body's usual
method of cooling itself. Popular
inence Monthly.
ARTHUR DAVES.
We lament the loss of a friend and
broil. or,
It is sad and lonely now,
But in heaven, we hope to meet him
Where to the Savior, we will bow.
. ' !'
I cannot think that he is gone
So far away, ..''
He's resting now! He will, return!. .
He will not stay! ' . '
Fannot think that pleasant smile
No more we'll see
'Tis only veiled a .little while,
From you and me.
That cheerful voice
Is not hushed for aye, ,'
In angel choir, it will rejoice
Some long, glad day.
I'cannot think that brilliant brain .
Will mount no more;
For loftier height it will attain.
New realms explflfp.
That loving heart
Won't throb alone,
With Christ he chose, the better part
All his are ohe!
A loving Father's hand I trace,
In all I see,
He went to prepare a place
For you and me.
0, patience, heart, grief unalloyed,
Is not his will!
On earth there is no aching void
But heaven can fill.
The past is o'er waste not thy days
' iu'vain regret;
Grieve thou no more,
Look now before and not behind thee
. Do not fret the past is o'er. ' r
The paiij... was,. sore. . and there was
cause for sorrow,
Yet. grieve thou no more
Close memory's door, that day is dead
That sun has set, the past is o'er.
There are in store for you and me,
Still happy' days, so, forget!
And grieve no more, smile as of yore,
No. longer let thine eyes be wet.
Grieve not .any more,
For we will meet
Dear Arthur again some day,
On heaven's beautiful shore.
AN OAK DALE FRIEND.
Farmers' Money Gone West.
Consumers are paying high prices
for farm products on the local mar
kets but very little of this money is
remaining in' Western North Caro
lina. The local markets are full of
apples, but these apples are from the
west; Hood river apples! Idahp po
tatoes! California lettuce! Chicago
beef'aii'l hams! Tennessee butter!
Tennessee eggs! The consumers are
paying for farm , products but the
money goes straight west.
. Help hold the dollar. He is going
due west unless we can stop him.
and stop him !we can. The way fo
stop him is by growing more apples,
more potatoes, more truck, more
pouhry, more cows. We need the
dollars in our homes, we need the
dollars for our schools, and for our
churches. We can only collar . the
dollar by growing more produce and
putting it up in first-class packages,
Make your plans now to help collar
the dollar. Set your hens and increase
the' size of your flocks of poultry,
double your acreage of potatoes, put
more cws in your barns and get on
a cream route and keep the money
at home. .
The consumer wants it kept at
home, the banks will help you keep it
at home, your family needs it at
home. Help collar the dollar. Farm
ers' Federation !News.
(With the hay front our meadows,
clover and soy beans, and the apples
from our orchards, it looks as if
none of Macon County's dollars
should go west next year. From the
cream that is being sold, the poultry
sales that are being held, and the po
tatoes, cabbage and beans that are
being planted, it looks like many dol
lars would come to Macon County.)
-The Poultry Flock. V r
Crowd your chicks for rapid
growth.. As soon as the young cock
erels weigh from a pound and a
quarter to a pound and' a half sell
them for friers, getting the money
and cutting down the feed bill. Push
the pullets so they will make as rapid
a growth as possible and will begin
laying in October Watch' the old
henscarefullv and get rid of them as
soon as they" stop laying instead of
feeding them all summer and selling
them in the fall. A hen that will pay
to keep should keep' right on laying
until she begins moulting in the fall.
Get rid of the quitters as soon as
possible.- At this time of year eggs
are cheap, but the flock is at the peak
of production). As soon as the pro
duction of eggs begins to drop hunt
out the loafers and sell them. During
the hot weather the price of eggs will
be higher and there will be about the
same profit from a smaller flock, of
good layers, provided you curf ot
the boarders. Farmers' Federation
News. '
VILL SAVE YOU HONEY ;
If you knew that you could get several dollars
back for every dollar you invested it. would not take
you' long'to decide, would it ? You would invest at
once. ..''
' i
Well, that is just what you can do by investing in
the subscription price to your Local Newspaper. It
will be the means of saving you several dollars during
the year if you will allow it to do so. It is the best in
vestment you can make for the money.
''..; Say nothing about, the local news it carries but
consider it just as a business proposition, a money
.saver. It carries the advertisements of the local mer
chants, and by keeping track of these from week to
week you will be able during the year to save yourself
many times the cost of the year's subscription in buy
ing the things you need and want. All you have to do
'is to watch the advertising columns and the bargains
offered by your home merchants will-allow you to
supply your wants at the bargain prices they offer. '
This helps in another way. It helps the local mer
chant to keep, up his stock if you buy at home and
makes his a better store for your community. It helps
the newspaper business, which is boosting your home
town every week.. Both of these help you as they
help to make your town a little better and that means
increasingthe value of your property. '
You get the idea? Take your home newspaper as
an investment, not as a sort of act of charjty, but be
cause it will be worth real money to you. You can
make it worth more or less, just as you use it. But if.
you depend on borrowing it instead of having it sent
direct to you, there-will be many times when it gets
around to you too late. Those who subscribe for it
and get it right away will have taken the bargain you
may want. Get your name on the list right away.
North Skeenah Locals.
.fir. Edwards passed through thi.--section
on his way to the saw mill.'
Mr. Jesse Sander's is back from
South Carolina, where he has been
at work. "
Mr. Robert Carpenter was in
Franklin the past week on business.
Drs. Siler and Fouts were up to sec
Mrs. Fred Henderson Tuesday, j She
is very sick. We wish her a speedy
recovery. . .. t
Mr. Charey Pitts purchased a car
the past week. BILLY.
for. Economical Transportation
THE 1924 CHEVROLET IS THE WORLD'S
GREATEST AUTOMOBILE VALUE
Heavier Rear-Axle. ' ? '
Improved Braking System.
Greater Road Clearance.'
Added Body and Motor Refinements.
;.' and
The Famous High-Powered Valve-in-Head
Chevrolet Engine. v .
Let us , give you a Demonstration of this
Remarkable Car. ,
THE PRICE IS $600.00 AT FRANKLIN
Terms if Desired.
LYLE
THE FRANKLIN PRESS
52 Weeks for $1100
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It stops when you stop
Send your subscription NOW
Scroll Nws.
Messrs. Geo. Gregory and Luther
McCall-attended the Federal Court
at Asheville a few days ago. ,
On the 911;, Mr. Alex Shook and
daughter, Miss Daffa, of Shookville.
were listing taxes at the .Walnut
Creek school house, t
Mr. Zack Peek made a . business .
trip to Ellijay a few days ago.
. Mr. C. N. Jones is very much bet
ter at present. '..'.'
Mr. A. B. Moses is at home again
from his Jackson County trip. F.M.
1
C0IIPANY
    

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