North Carolina Newspapers

    Page 6
THE WAYNESVILLE MOUNTAINEER
THURSDAY, SEPTE.MRFp
Man Given $167 For
Scene Of Services For Mellon
HERE and THERE
By
Hilda Way Gyu
"BitinMnto
FACTS
FROM
WASHINGTON
(Compiled by The United States Newt)
American investments in China and
Japan are valued at more than $500,
000,000. Missionary properties in
China are valued at $50,000,000, most
ly in mereantiles. Invesments in Ja
pan amount to $376,000,000 and are
mostly represented in securities and
bonds.
Although women have the right to
vote everywhere in the United States
under the 19th Amendment to the Con
stitution, more than a thousand laws
discriminating against them remain
on the statute books of the State. The
National Womens Party is campaign
ing for another constitutional amend
ment to correct this inequality.
More than 180,000 tons of ocean
shipping are under construction today
in American shipyards, which exceeds
the record of any recent year. Last
year American ships carrying Ameri
can products found their way into
more than 700 foreign ports.
If the steel rails used on the main
lines of the railroads of this country
were put on scales, the total weight
BE
GOODRICH ENTERS
LOW-PRICED FIELD
- WITH A V
FULL-
LONG
DIMENSION
MILEAGE
TIRE
No "KttacWV
Full tix. "Wta
reiiniu" nbbc
throughout ia
ibii bi, fauefcy
Goodrich Cm
miodtr Tin.
Of
--art?
Ye jiri
Now that th
makers of the fnmnii
Goodrich Safety Silver
town Tire have invaded tha
low-priced tire field; plenty of mo
toroti are in line to cut their bra
coeti. Because; even though it's
priced rock bottom, this Goodrich
Commander is full dimension;
same sue as our higher-priced tires
and built with a wide, deep; heavy
tread. We've just received new
stocks from the factory. Don't
miss this opportunity.
X
4.40 I a
05$g35
4.S0 1 20
.Ma
$g70$y20!
.7Sllt S.OOll
OTHER SIZES IN PROPORTION
PriteMubictiachnnMtaiihaitfut4m t
tGoodricht
f Commanders
"IVIRY INCH A aOODRICH TIKI? J
C. V.Bell, Distributor
Commission Agent For The
Texas Company.
liV'.A' ' ' -
?MX'S'' f -" 1t .- ''.
m$y . --' - I; i ; ' -
f t,'"' :z mi ;
Wmm ' 4 -rm r s i i
i M 11 tv n - . " $
f fS t Si f 'JlLI II '''- ':w$rx$
East Liberty Presbyterian Church
This magnificent structure in Pittsburg, the East Liberty 1'res
Dyterian church, made possible largely through the generosity ot
Andrew W. Mellori aad his brxvther, K, B. Mellon, was the swne of
last rites for the former secretary of the treasury.
would approximate 44,000,000 tons, ac
cording to research experts of the
railroads.
Several thousand aliens, whose
names are in the files of the Federal
Bureau of Immigration, are subject to
deportation proceedings because of il
legal entry or for offenses involving
moral turpitude abroad.
Half of the highway-railroad grade
crossing accidents last year took place
within city areas.
A new kind of park, heretofore in
corporated in the National Park Sys
tem, is established by legislation just
approved by President Roosevelt
creating the Cape Hatteras National
Seashore on the North Carolina banks.
The authorized area will include more
than 100 square miles on the islands
of Chicamacomico, Ocracoke, Bodie,
Roanoke, and Collington, including
Cape Hatteras and its historic light
house. Roanoke Island was the scene
of the first English settlement in
America. The region is a great area
for waterfowls.
The demand for hard money seems
to be sharply falling off. The United
States mints last month turned Out
about half the number of new coins
than they did in August, 1936, when
the output was 62,442,930 coins, valu
ed at $4,502,466. In August this year,
the output was 33,902,337, coins, val
ued at $2,580,155.
The Government is running low on
its stock of old cannon to be fyiven to
cities and towns for the decoration of
parks and public squares. The sup
ply of Civil War and captured Ger
man artillery has been exhausted.
Some other types are still available,
but not in great number..
The Government is embarking on a
nation-wide program for conserva
tion of -wild-life, under a new law,
effective July 1 1938.. It authorizes
future Congress appropriations equa,l
to all Federal revenues from taxes on
firearms, shells and cartridges, esti
mated at $3,000,000 annually, to fi
nance Federal-State acquisition and
development of areas for wild life and
to aid in research in wild life manage
ment. It is the first instance of such
Federal use of revenue from firearms.
Hunting license fees of states taking
part in the funds must be used for
wild life conservation.
Greedy Appetite Gets
Shark Blown To Pieces
N. C. Crops Are
Best In Years
Wheat Is The Best Since 1900,
Survey Just Completed Shows
Corn And Apples Good
W, H. Rhodes, chief of the State
Department of Agriculture's statistics
division, forecasts the heaviest wheat
crop in North Carolina since 1900 and
said "other crops throughout the state
are growing nicely, cultivation is good
and generally favorable season pre
vails. "While complaints of continued dry
weather during June were reported
from all sections of the state, the sit
uation is much improved over that of
a month ago,'" the agricultural sta
tistician added, basing his report on
information from state-federal crop
reporters.
Other crop reports were as follows;
Corn 2,326,000 acrejs in cultiva
tion, with 44,194,000 bushels expected.
Wheat A fi.228,000 bushel crop.
Oats 32,233,000 acres, indicating
a total of 4,660,000 bushels for har
vest. Hay Crops 32,233,000 acres, indi
cations that 750,000 tons will be pro
duced, Irish Potatoes 92,000 acres for
harvest, with total production esti
mated at 9,200,000 bushels.
Soybeans The average is 258,000.
Apples A 4,200,000 bushel crop is
in prospect compared with 1,890,000
bushels harvested in 1936.
Peaches 1,860,000 bushels harvest
ed as normal crop for the state.
Grapes Normal production indica
cates 7,900 tons.
SCHOOL LUNCHES
A tale of a shark whose appetite
got the best of it was told by officers
of the coast geodetic survey vessel,
Pioneer, upon their return to the
Long Beach, Calif, port.
The big fish swallowed a depth
bomb, which is about the size of a
cocoanut and fitted with a fuse which
burns under water. A few seconds
later a column of water shot upwards.
Fragments of the shark came with
it. V
-And Every Cloud Has
A Silver Lining
Lois Blankenburg publishes a paper
m lirants rass, ure., ana naa a
"scoop" when, she reported to police,
her car was stolen from in frpnt of her
home.
Later in the day she nad another
story. The car was back with a note
m . . . i. 1 1
jirom a service siaiion saying ji nuu
' been picked up and lubricated by mistake.
Place of School Lunches in the Diet
An adequate diet for growing chil
dren is of the utmost importance.
Not only many of the ills of child
hood, decayed teeth, staunted growth,
etc., but some of the physical disor
ders of later life have been traced to
lack of proper nourishment during
the early years.
Recent better understanding of the
relation of diet to diease has resulted
in studies of the food and health hab
its of children with a view to improv
ing them.
The school lunch has come in for its
share of scrutiny. Wherever possible
a hot lunch prepared and served to
the children at school is being provid
ed by the school authorities, by Some
civic organization or by the teacher
with the help of her students. This is,
of course, for children who jve t00
far from home, or who for some other
The subject of spittoons and their
use has from time to time been much
agitated in this neck of the woods . . .
or perhaps I should say . . . the ma
jor item of controversy has centered
around the lack of the use of the
spittoon ... for even when we have
them placed in public buildings seme
of our natives . . . have looked with
disdain upon them . . . and with their
Anglo Saxon independence . . . have
spit wherever they pleased ... I have
always considered the spittoon a defi
nitely rural problem ... of course I
knew they had them in cities . . . cut
I thought they were merely tolerated
and not ever mentioned . . . nnd now
we see that up in New York City they
are having a great time over twenty
four spittoons that have recently bten
placed in one of the city administra
tive buildings. ...
It stems that American Labor
, ... . which is trying to have a "say
so" about everything in the coun
try, is objecting to the spittoons
because they are marked "Made in
Germany" . . . and the city officials
responsible fir their purchase are
explaining. that thy were bought
because they were guaranteed to
be noiseless. . . . Now that word
"noiseless" has me, both puzzled
and intrigued . . what does it
mean? ... I had the impression
that the smack of the spitter as
the juice left his mouth was the
major explosion and not the
sound of the liquid as it contacted
the spittoon. . . . But we live and
learn . . . I had hoped to have an
opportunity this week to spend
sometime at the court house and
observe some of the county's out
standing spitters . . . but owing to
the holiday on Monday have been
denied the time, for this privilege.
However 1 am promising myself
that during next court week when the
county's temple of justice is "thronged
with the multitudes" that I will avail
myself of the chance to make a com
plete survey . . . and thereby satisfy
myself on this all absorbing subject .
the thought has just come . . . that
perhaps the mountain highlander . . .
(as Horace Kephart politely called us)
and the city bred spitter have a dif
ferent spitting technic ... perhaps
the New Yorker controls the'situation
. . . and makes more of an art of it
than the native of this section . . . for
I can vouch that we have many poor
shots . . . I feel certain that the other
morning when I was showered with
fragrant brown juice from our favor
ite weed . . was neither intentional
nor personal on the part of the spit
ter but merely that his aim was
bad .... I would have judged that he
is not spittoon-minded . . . therefore
has not formed the habit of a good
aim ... and no doubt his friends rec
ognizing his attitude . . . know how
to dodge at the proper time . . . but
not knowing the gentleman in ques
tion I did not realize the opportune
moment to clear the side walk. . .
While on the subject ... I would
like to tell you . . . .... about an
arrangement in one ov mar near
by western counties ... on the
center of the main hall of the
court house is a large iron ring . .
about 4 feet in diameter and six
inches in height . . a rather unique
, . . and I would judge from the
spitter's standpoint, a most sat
isfactory . , . spittoon . . . it is
filled with sawdust, sand and oi
er absorbants . , . and affords a
perfect target for both the pro
fessional and the amateur . the
degree of proficiency . . . I was
told was the distance the spitter
made with his shot as regarded the
central ring v. . this idea is merely
passed along to the county com
missioners . . . as : they might
sometime wish tohave our court
house fitted out with all modern
conveniences. . . . :
reason are not able to have a satis
factory lunch at home.
Particularly in rural territories,
where pupils have to start early and
sometimes walk considerable distan
ces, a warm nourishing lunch is nec
essary to keep the children physically
fit and mentally alert.
Most city school systems now make
provision for lunch rooms. Usually
these are cafeterias and they are ably
controlled by a manager, very often
in co-operation with the Home Eco
nomics work in the schools.
HOME CANNERS
: Buy Your Produce
w
, Fresh and Home-Grown.
All kinds of produce and vegetables for
canning and table use.
Farmer's Exchange & Produce Co.
Phone 130-31
East Waynesville Asheville Road
Wasn't
ponies
rav 1
in
it good to see horses and
the parade ... on Labor
to those of us old enough
to remember the old county fair when
the horses made the parade . . . there
was a thrill in even the sight of the
ponies on Monday . . , Bill Chambers
and his committee deserve honorable
mention this week in the execution of
the plans for our first Labor Day cele
bration ... it isn't easy to get three
thousand people together ... in this
immediate section . . . and to get them
in holiday mood is good for every
body ... the Girl Scouts and the Boy
Scouts added an impressive touch to
the crowd ... in their uniforms . . .
and weren't you happy for the little
boy who climbed the pole and got the
$3.00 in cash? . , .
itis are elwav 1, ,
man who bites a dop ' r? '"
news. Last week HanS??
newsmen got more than c"
story, because Berna-d r": '
lected $164 because he 'l
The dog was a frankC" '
Corona said, "was a tr 'c
that broke his tooth " i
The judge assess dan. ,. .
against a butcher and paVkir"'C; '
To Pay
v,iuiiese iveaay
For Damages To Lin,
The Chinese gnvernn-....
their apologies and . "-'1
ing to pay all damages i','4 i
liner President Hoover wa ,'"" I
u :
iimee aviators in
in Shanghai waters.
a l'trtT:t
Financial Statement & Budget Estimate
TOWN OF WAYNESVILLE
June 30, 1937
GENERAL FUND RECEIPTS
Actual
1936-S7
Court Costs
Cemetery Lots ...
Refunds
Privilege Taxes .
Taxes
Prior Levies
Current Levy
4,2t;s.;t.ri.
57.dU
l.l)o(v')'
5,441.08
13,141.47
TOTAL
. $ii4,iyu;:(
GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES
2,770.0(1
737.W
510.00
200.00
700.00
24U.U0
.1,263.41'
Administrative Salaries ...........
Administrative Expense
Health Department
Chamber cf Commerce ............
Legal
Town Library
Tax Department and Miscellaneous
Police Department
it-'alaries
Boarding Prisoners
Police Car
Other Expences
Fire Department -
Salaries and Wages ...........
KnniinTTlnt ...
Insurance and Miscellaneous ..... 1.015.56
Cemetery Department
Armory . ... .
New Town Hall (In excess pf bonds)
Emergency
Deficit July 1, 1936 ..... .......
Deficit June 30, 1937 ..............
3,637.1'0
1,061.40
736.75
2,821.lJ4
1,758.0(1
. 770.67
453.80
6,308.14
. 54.60'-8,479.17
TOTAL
Miscellaneous Income
Taxes
Prior Levies . . .
Current Levy . .
; .$33,5 1-8.05
STREET FUND RECEIPTS
,
3.00
3,238.57
8,991.54
TOTAL
Salaries and Wages
Insurance . .....
Paving Costs . .
Equipment . ....
Damages Awarded
Maintenance
Emergency
Deficit July 1, 1936 .
Deficit June 30, 1937
.$12,233.11
STREET FUND EXPENDITURES
$ 3,yZ4..
. .;. ... 157.24
.......... 4,005.33
' 963.02
.... 262.00
Expense 1,390.05
........... 25.00
TOTAL
4,486.59
, . ...... .$15,214.15
DEBT SERVICE FUND RECEIPTS
Balance July 1, 1S36 ................ . .... . ... .$ 8,933.W
Assessments .... . 11,770.94
Light Fund Transfer . ....... .... . . . ... . . . .... 16,688.08
Water Fund Transfer . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . 15,143.37
Taxes
Prior Levies y,475.13
Current
Balance June 30, 1937 ....
TOTAL $62,01 0..'8
DEBT SERVICE FUND EXPENDITURES
Bond Maturities ...$ 7,000.00
Notes
Interest . . . . ; .'. ..... ... , ..... . .. .... ... . , . .v.. .... 28,537.55
Cost New Bonds ....................
Sinking Fund .............
TOTAL
.$35,537..
LIGHT FUND RECEIPTS ,.
Collections-Debt Service Transfer Deducted v. . .$22,13 .i-'
LIGHT FUND EXPENDITURES
Salaries and Wages ..... . . . . . ... . . .....$ 2,10,1.88
Administrative Expense . . ....... . . . . .'. . . . ...... 352.42
Electric Current ........ ... . . .... ... . . . 17,091. 14
Property Maintenance . . . .... . ... . . ... . . . .... ... i.29(,,.!'l
Equipment ...... ...... ....... ..... .... . l,29i''
TOTAL
. .$"22;i35.23
WATER FUND RECEIPTS
Collections iDebt Service Fund Transfer Deducted $ 4,769..-
WATER FUND EXPENDITURES
Salaries and Wages
Administrative Expense
Property Maintenance . .
Equipment ...... . .-
' ; TOTAL; . . ... , . . . ,
Fund
General . . .
Street ......
Debt .
Light-
Water
TOTAL
. S 2.57b.!
546.57
''. 1,238.07:
408.04
:. 4,769,5 v.
SUMMARY
Total Budget
Requirement
.$ 33,860.00 -.
9,070.00
. 57,385.00
. 24,200.00
. 5,100.00
.$12915.0O
CERTIFICATE
Current Taxi'? ,vv
. to Balance
. $l!'.l'i""'"
6.0-
,4.i02.('(l.
$30,72
'O.O')
J Wl(),
4,
4.250,
I.llKl!
960,
510
soo
300
xm
IM
XM
a
3.443
i.Wt
S,3i:
I 41
2.501
xd
151
1.41
? 9,01
IS.DOfl
: 2.173
: ifi
26,4'3
Sll.OOOl
. 3('
' i;-:.l
-J-14.2W1
I'.W
3(0
i0
XW
1.3W1
t -:0.
' . xM
: tW1
1 nave audited- the books of the Town of waynesvuie. - - , tx?
certify that in my opinion the foregoing statements of K1'1-1'5 J'.yl'
ditures correctly reflect the cash position of the several fu(! ;;rl
oi waynesvuie lor the year ended Jvne 3U,'ltf3. -iueier.
funds not included in the foregoing). ''. ,';.0-jr.:i'-
T. TROY WCHE, Certified Public
vfar 1
:i i . . . .....,':'. , , . . . . .. the '
uexaueu siaxement oi t.ne ioregomg Duagei esiimaif .r
duly adopted by the Board of Aldermen is on hie in tne u"
Clerk. :;. '": ' ,- rrk.
:' HKRWIG A. LOVK, 'lor. -
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view