North Carolina Newspapers

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f PAGE TWO (Thud Section)
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THE WAYNESVILLE MOUNTAINEER
THE MOUNTAINEER
niaia Street Pbone 79
Waynesville, 'North Carolina
The County Seat ef Haywood Coanty
Published By
THE WAYNESVILLE PRINTING CO.
t W. CURTIS WUSS
-Editor
W. Curtis Russ and Marlon T. Bridges, Publishers
PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY
One Year
Six Months .
HAYWOOD COUNTY
$3.00
1.75
NORTH CAROLINA
but vear
'Six Tioriths.
OUTSIDE NORTH CAROLINA
$4.00
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One Year .
Sis Months
$4.W
2.50
I.
fciitmit al the post offira t Wavr-avill. N C, Second OImm
IMmiI Matter, as (.raridwi under the Act of Mrcb i, 1B7K, NiikhIh'
J0, in 14.
i ODttiuirv nlir, resolutions of respect, ood ot thanka. arid all
jnotn f" entertainment for profit, will be charged tor at the raw
f utw and a lialf centa per word.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
i Yr Aewuintnl Vrrtt h entitled nrluairelj to the use for re
!yutnyi.n i.f all the local neura printed in thla newepapei.
(-ell u an AJ' r.ewe aispairnea.
NATIONAL DITORIAI
S50CIATION
S)aM CaraUae) jX
FRIDAY. MARCH 12. 1948
Sensible Styles
A special section of The Mountaineer today
is devoted to the showing of new spring and
Easter fashions. The extreme styles which
so many expected are surprisingly absent.
Of course the dresses are longer, but the
fashion experts were keen enough to drop
them little by little until the change has been
'Even the hats this spring are not the "out
' bf this world" type which harassed man and
Wast several years ago. We have a feeling
,that the extremes are over, and that the well
dressed woman will try to be as feminine as
possible, in the future.
The trend towards femininity is ceitairm
encouraging. After all. women like to dress
up and like to step out. which suits us fine,
as 'long as their taste of styles make us want
to take the second look, instead of turn the
other way.
Ladies, were for you and your sensible
Styles.
The Question Needs
An Answer
Senator Kenneth McKellar, Democrat, of
Tennessee, recently took the bull by the
horns and came out unequrvocabfy that the
United States must at once take steps to halt
the advance of the Russians even to the use
of force.
We haven't always been a great admirer
of the Tennessee Senator, but his statements
on the Russians and their satellites certanly
is a step in the right direction.
The shilly-shallying and dilly-dallying of
the State Department in recent weeks has ;
been deplorable. Secretary of State Marshall
assumed his duties with much fanfare and
probablv had the confidence of of all the
people more than any secretary of recent J
years. 1
Why he has accomplished so little is still ,
1 U I
a mystery lo most oi us. ui course, nc n
been blocked by the Republican majority
in the Congress, but still we believe 'there is
some vital spark lacking in our dealings with
foreign nations and especially with the Rus
sians. Every day, it seems, comes reports of
the Russians violating our zones in Germany.
Why is this0 Are the two military estab
lishments of Russia and the United States
at such variance that every little disagree
ment becomes a national incident?
Seldom do we read of any incidents be
tween the English and Russians in their re
spective zones in Germany. Is it because
England and Russia work in greater agree
ment or are the English supinely taking what
ever the Russians dish out without saying
anything?
The American people, we believe, should
know the answer to all these questions. Just
what our status with the Russians is should
become the knowledge of all the people and
not be merely tiled away in the State Depart
ment's top secret drawers to gather dust.
Senator McKellar, of course, knows far
more about conditions in the Russian and
American zones than the average man in the
street and when he, conservative in most
things that he is, comes out with a statement
that he made recently, there should certainly
be something done about it.
t
WHO'S NEXT?
I'More Opportunities
, There is considerable enthusiasm locally
behind the proposition to stage a Cherokee
Indian and Pioneer Drama in our neighbor
ing communtv only 25 miles across Soco Gap.
Plans for the drama have been gone into ex
haustively bv Western North Carolina Asso
ciated Commumt.es, and the situation has
now reached the point where this region will
make the decision of putting up the money to
get the drama under proau.'. - i-
pone action to a later date.
General sentiment here is uun -s
. . nioc vrViirh stand
Isigned to the respective mu... - -
io benefit by the drama can be accepted, and
. ...1 ttinn of the drama this
! knake possioie pt."-
rummer.
V If this comes true, then Waynesville is in
Iposs.blv the best location of all commun.ties
l benefit from the increased travel and the
longer stay of visitors that would result from
haying a major cultural attraction at Chero-
This in itself is enough to revive considera
tion of the need here for an adequate mod
ern hotel. The need may not be acute this
summer-a general decline in vacation traye
as predicted by the experts-but signs point
Jdefin.terv to a growing demand for add.tion-
. , This is an opportunity
Which this newspaper hopes local capital
I . . ctartd on a modest scale, but
laci on, even n
if not acted on by our ow n people ,t is too
lien an opportunity for outside interests to
Jpverlook indefinitely.
I Along this same line of thought, it is t.me
i fthat we began to realize that competition in
: the tourist field is becoming keener and keen
fer Other mountain communities, the sea
joast of this state and throughout the south,
C going after the tourist dollars more than
! ,ever This year will also perhaps e the
Catest travel to foreign places since 1940.
"it all adds up that there is a big job to be
'done to get and keep the tourist business
growing.
' 1 'i .., if tnr-
v i f i t ..,.iri Hp a more meuaiiv
I I III ' f XI
i v i . . .. -v, r maior concern
5 '-Hi ing the nexi wo iu
: : ,?! i could be about showers and flowers. Juch
J; M'L will 1 said, and P1.
u Sves here, about theaUonal elects m Italy
;1 li ii.durlng April and the, partition of, Palestine
'J'khat is time-Ubled lot May, l
Sy
Rambling 'Round
Bits Of Human Interest News Picked Up By Members
Of The Mountaineer Staff
"Can't you reiiieniber u lu n mi
invited all the family in for Sun
day dinner and the piece de resist
ance was fried chicken
look we are undecided whether
to take along just an umbrella
... or add the omnipresent ga
mut loshes. After the surprise of
last Saturday, we should be pre
pared at all times for whatever
moisture may descend from the
skies.
We on the stall have had the
: ' i' .k
cl t
Getting Ready Fast
Announcement has been made that the
North Carolina National Guard will hold a
two-week encampment at Fort Bragg during
Julv.
This can be taken as a sign that the Guard
reorganization is progressing satisfactorily,
for it requires some military proficiency
merely to work out the details of transporta
tion and supply to assemble several thousand
men from all sections of the state for an in
tensive training period. In Waynesville we
have the Antitank Company, a unit of the
120th Infantry Regiment. Thirtieth (Old
Hickory) Division, by which we can measure
the DroL'ress of the Guard as a whole.
The Antitank Company is less than a year
old, having been federally recognized last
Mav when it stepped in to succeed, on a per
manent basis, the State Guard company
which served during wartime. Two-hour
training periods are held every Thursday eve-,
ning at the Armory a building brought here
primarily for the Guard, but useful for many
other civic purposes. The training is carried
out by commissioned and non-commissioned
officers, several of whom were Guardsmen
before and during the war. all with previous
military experience.
Training in the National Guard necessarily
includes a great deal of basic military subjects
drilling, military courtesy, etc., which ap
ply to all soldiers since many of its mem
bers are in uniform for the first time. In ad
dition, the Antitank Company at each weekly
session carries out period of training in the
special equipment with which it is supplied,
striving for efficiency as a single unit and as
a part of a regiment, a division, an army. Old
time Guardsmen who look in the Armory
now will be amazed at the modern equipment
on hand. Although named Antitank Com
pany, the unit is organized and equipped ex
actly like a Tegular armored '(tank) company,
it hoc nlronrlv two medi um tanks, a small
1 l I IWJ mmiw- - '
truck and jeep in vehicles. The company has
the most modern arms: semi-automatic rifles
and carbines, pistols, .30 and .50 caliber ma
chine guns. It has radios and telephones
and all the men are learning how to operate
them also a movie projector and screen. The
Guardsmen are clothed from steel helmet to
combat boots in serviceable uniforms, have
the latest gas warfare protective equipment.
And once every three months, the Guard has
pavday, when the members draw a full day's
army pay for each drill attended during the
previous quarter.
The men must enjoy this taste of the mili
tary. Since the company was federally rec
ognized, nearly 30 of the men -have been dis
chargeda good portion of them to enter the
Regular Army, Navy or Marine Corps. The
present strength is 45 enlisted and five officer
norsonnel. This leaves some 30 openings for
young men -who can qualify." If you can,
drop by the Armory next Thursday night and
help fill out its ranks. You.. will "serve your
country, and at the same time, yourself .
everybody wanted white meat .' nd
fryers weren't built Unit way then.
But in our rambling 'round, we
have found a different story now.
Fryers are all white meiit - or dark
if von nrcfiM- and oil call satisfv
the whole family. Yon can buy time ot our lives seeing an uie
eight white meat portions and oneslories of the Easter parade before
dark piece for Uncle Toby . . . it conies to gladden your eyes. You
who doesn't like fried chicken, any- will find in this issue one of the
vviiy. prettiest sets of pages that you
have gazed upon in a long time.
Nowadays when we open our And the best part of this display is
sleepy eyes and look out the that there is something to suit and
wlndw if the skv bears a leaden iConiinueJ on Page Three
JKIRROR OF YOUR MIND
FRIDAY, MARcH ,
Consulting Psycho
U they once let th-JTt
ceed at somelhin? tn.
. i
would be dunoernti-H
"J'J Wtal.T
l Secrt
V"em '" not hjafcj
them, and
tustifv what ...i..
, . "niLuurai
they make
sort shall h
people hav
a b
Should a girl of sixteen
Answer: There is not much use
in telling her ehe must not this
will usually only make her more
determined. But a girl who wants
to "settle down" so early either
has a sense of insecurity about her
parents and her home life or can't
feel sure that her playmates like
her or both. Anyhow, she's look
ing for something to "tie to" at an
age when her main interest nor
mally would be in good times and
in getting as much admiration and
attention from as many boys as
she could. What she needs is love
and reassurance, not a scolding.
"settle down" to one boy?
Are there people who insist
on being "failures"?
Answer: Yes, though they do it
unconsciously. There are men and
women whose whole attitude
toward life Is based on the idea
that they have always been un
fairly treated and have "never
Can you see moreclwrlJ
vou'rfl "Lo.,.j 1
"-JWI up-
answer: .No, writes SuJ
Trent tJ., i ,, 1
rhnlnrfKt i 'ri,., , ' 1
, 1Ilt. j0urnal,
eral Psychul,j;;y; jt u ,
other way aiound. Expe,
which he ivp., its -hawed H,,
jects paitly na. mUztd
uuwi wcr auie to see ra,.
curutely than they ofo
could. He cuii. luiiesthati,,,
of "geneial m-urjl excitaii
vuiai ib, m'lvous tension"),
vision is more apt to be ha
than to be dearer Thettii,,
nothing yiJU ran'M a
wnen youi iininl iS airat
VOICE
OF THE
PEOPLE
What is your favorite poem?
Mrs. Kussell 1.. Young: i like
too many poems to have a favor
ite but one I enjoy in the spring
is Trees.' bv Joyce Kilmer.''
I
PRESIDENT'S WIFE CINCHES
APPROVAL OF RADIO WOMEN
By JANE EADS
WASHINGTON Mrs. Truman
was belle of the ball that Mrs
Perle Mesta gave for visiting radio
girls to wind up their three-day
convention.
"Why, she just seems to ho like
one of us." said several of the Kirls!
afterwards. I
The day before the first lady had
entertained for the women broad-1
casters at a White House tea. The
President, who usually stays away
Miss Margaret Johnston: " 'Af
ternoon On a Hill," by Edna St.
Vincent Millay."
from these affairs, made a surprise
appearance, and Mrs. Truman min
gled with the group, urging them
to taste the chocolate cake or the
"brownies." which she said were
"very good." I
Ranking guests with Mrs. Tru-1
man at Mrs. Mesta's party were
Mrs. Fred Vinson, wife of the chief
justice, and many cabinet wives,
all decked out in their most ele
gant evening gowns. Margaret
Truman was also on hand, as were
other young members of the cap
ital's official family, including Dru
eie Snyder, daughter of the secre-
Mrs. Heinz Kollman: 1 love all
of Longfellow's poems."
Mrs. J. Howell Way. Sr.: That
is a very hard Ucstion for me to
answer since I hav,. always liked
poetry and have so many favorites.
However, two of my special favor
ites are 'Life's Minor,' by Madeline
Bridges and 'The Sins of Omis
sion,' by Margaret K. Sanger. "
Mrs. W. T. Crawford: "For vari
ety of ideas expressed and from
early childhood memories. 1 would
say Gray's 'Elegy In a Country
Church Yard.' arid perhaps because
I visited that old churchyard and
Gray's tomb and stood under the
old yew tree miles out toward the
heart of England.''
Capital Letters
Br THOMPSON GREENWOOD
tai v of I he treasury.
Urueie. a brunette, is a radio
commentator herself. She has her
own program on a local station, and
old-timers in the business say she's
gol a real future before her.
Small flower-decorated tables
had been set up throughout the
spacious looms. The United Na
tions was the motif for both dec
iC'ont inued on Page Three)
OVERPAYMENT OF TAXES
With the income tax man now eat
ing with you, sleeping with you,
going where you go and doing what
you do until you finally throw him
out of your mind on March 15, a
note on those hundreds of North
Carolinians who might purposely
pay too much income tax seems
very appropriate.
It seldom happens on the state
level though North Carolina does
pay six per cent interest on over
payments. Revenue Commission
er Edwin Gill, who, by the way,
really knows his taxes, says he can
recall only one instance in which
a taxpayer seemed purposely to
overpay. The State itevenue de
partment noted the rather flagrant
error in overpayment one year, let
it go as just that, but the next
year another big error occurred in
this man's return. The matter was
called to his attention. Edwin Gill,
wanting to save the state money,
contacted this taxpayer, the re
fund wm made, and the citizen
agreed not to charge interest on
the overpayment.
But the federal people are watch
ing this year the huge overpay
ments. Of course, the taxpayer
does not want to pay too little (he
might want to, but he dare not), so
it is easv to take the long view,
pay too much, and get a refund
with six per cent interest which
is plenty good return in these days.
So when you read of these huge
tax overpayments, remember that
they are not always accidental.
They are good investments ... if
accidental or intentional.
the "filthy weed" ,han
farmer in the world. Hun
a vwiuppniK ooa as ijaia;
year s 917 i. In the sen
is merchant -I'm mer K M
Robeson counl with 408 o
Looking Back Over The Years
15 YEARS AGO
The First National Bank opens
this morning after bank holiday. J
Special attention is called to the
proclamation of President Roose
velt against hoarding, melting or
earmarking of gold or silver coin.
Much enthusiasm is being shown
over the proposed Waynesville Dis
trict Chamber of Commerce.
200 barrels of flour are received
here for the needy. I
Work will begin soon on tearing
down the old jail. i
R. L. Prevost is named head of
' Western
Council.
North Carolina Safety
10 YEARS AGO
Crew of 30 men is completing
work on the 26-room addition to
the Waynesville Country Club.
Trains Nos. 19 and 20. operating
between Asheville and Bryson City
are discontinued.
16 cases are heard in Mayor's
Court in a week.
Mrs. W. R. Palmer, Mrs. R. .1.
Liner and Mrs. Bryan Payne of
Canton, entertain with a large con
tract party at the Waynesville
Country Club.
5 YEARS AGO
J A severe electric and rain storm
j puts out 35 telephones here this
i week.
$3,500 of Red Cross war fund
quota is now in hand.
! Industrial salvage committees
are named by Howard Clapp, coun-
ty chairman.
The Waynesville Post of the
American Legion observes the 24th
anniversary of the founding of the
American Legion in Paris, at din
ner meeting here.
Five yearlings from the farm of
Joe E. Rose make excellent show
ing in Moultrie, Ga.
IE
They'll Do It Every Time
By Jimmy Hatlo
TOBACCO ACREAGE Senator
William B. Umstead has expressed
the oninion roneatedlv that the
27.52 per cent cut in the North
Carolina flue-cured tobacco acreage
was just too much of a slash. His
worthy opponent, an official of To
bacco Associates, J. M. Broughton.
stood solidly on the 27.52 per cent
reduction. The matter became
somewhat of a political issue. Sen
ator Umstead said that the tobacco
Dicture has changed since the re
duction was set, and that tobacco
growers should not be cut more
than absolutely necessary. Brough
ton held that it would be danger
ous to alter the acreage to be
grown.
Last week it seemed definite
that J. M. Broughton had won the
battle on this score at least. Acre
ages were released. The 27.52 per
cent slash stood.
Shy, retiring C. L. Hardy, Greene
lounty bachelor, will this season
again have more acres devoted to
OFF THE CUKF-
spections and drivers' ta.
making the stale admiisJ
and its leaders very, vtrj
lar in sonic sections . . ,
pected lo reduce the Dm
vote in many cnuntiesthiiJ
J. M. Broughton lias m.
D. Johnson, ol Clinton. ti
paign manager Headqtu
be room 531. or thereabout!
Sir Waller
Broughtun's decision top
to business is said lo km
brought on by acrelentei
ity in t he tinislead camp
largest political Mt'n in Ha
around 10 feel li lire.
over t he cnli ance to the Si
ter Hotel and reads: .11
headquarters" . . . Mostwf
nusscni'er on UalciKh-Vgl
runs these da.w Sen. S I
stead.
Reports rca( Inns RaW
the effect that business li
stores throughout t he stltt!
uary and February wasM
nhlv below the same m
1947 . . . Credit accouatf ;
creasing at a di?zv rate.,
loan companies arc dotal"
business since before tM
And colored mauls are
for work awui .
in farm prices is expected"
of Ihe government supports
90 per rcnl ol parity.
through the 1!H8 crap)"
.,.. ,..,-.,-v -.Iter II IIOUI
.r uhirh ;e 111 w
$800 Goes InGark
But Is Found in M
OKLAHOMA r,TYt;
F. (. .-nun ii v " "
VsUEEE'S THE
SUIT IS RUINED
AND I MAD IT
AAt5P TO OBDE5-
ONE UUNDEEDAND
Firry dollars.'
AMfYTU.eC SOUP-
CATCHER WHO TUrNlcS
I UPfc fiANUA fjTJLLECT-
ALL TME SOS'S WILL
I GIVE MIM IS A SNEER
-V AND A BLOTTER
NfWIP US KICKED
" A80UT EATIN6 THE
SOUP. I COULD
UNDERSTAND-
1
& UI1MNFPT AMD
C1PTV Rlir?! CAN
GET A CARLOAD OF THEM
SCARECBOW DUDS FOR
HALF THAT
V IF GERTIE X
KEEPS RUBBING
THAT GUY W LL
START A NEW
SINGLE-LAPEL
STVO-E
LAUUIN6 IT OFF A?
THE CUSTOMER TEES
TO CHISEL A SUIT
THAN a; ANly A TK
OF THE HATLO HAT .
TO
ALSCADUTO.
gKONK,N.y.
arbage
. I... .M.r PS
mirai ii - ' , u
hauled oil SSOO sue -temporal',!'
,n a iaH
....u , i siorc
Th.n. lctiine the
helped garha'-v co,-
box out ol i nc ' J
An horn lairr
and her,u,.-H d-jj
garbage v if
,.w,rs to help him
dump and after an J
the mom
home tin
he gave I
Anneal m
t very soul
.. . j ,in Si"
I III lieu r j
nM
lW 111"'
.u h lumper
invol
1fat Ale CoiduUly Omuted
To Attend
Black'i
Wednesday, March 17th, '" 4 '
AT THE
STRAND THEATRE
p.n
    

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