North Carolina Newspapers

    FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 1M
THE TVATNESVTLLE MOUNTAINEER
PAGE THREE Third Seeti6ti)
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their attention toward helping the
military. As a result of that help,
the U. S. Army today is armed
with chemical powders and sprays
that can be used in time of war to
kill all plants in an enemy coun
try. The Army has clamped an air
light secrecy on the subject and
won't even talk about it.
Many of the "inhibiting" and
stimulating" growth regulators
have practical, peace-time use.
Take 2,4-d. It has been used suc
cessfully to kill broad-leafed weeds
in fields of narrow-leafed food
plants, such as sugar cane, rice,
corn, wheat and rye. But it's dan
gerous to use unless precautions
are taken. It kills all broad-leafed
plants, crop or weed.
Then there is naphthaleneacetic
acid. It has been used since 1939
to keep apples from dropping from
trees before they ripen. And, to
day it is in wide use in orchards
111 the Pacific Northwest.
Must Learn "How"
Agriculture scientists are trjing
to refine those regulators and to
concoct new and better ones. They
believe the first step is to learn
how they work.
We still don't know what the
mechanism is," said Dr. George
living, assistant chief o!' agricul
tural chemistry. "We must learn
what happens between the time
the chemical is sprayed and the.
result is seen in the growing
plant."
Atomic power may solve the
()f iporblem by producing large quan
tities 01 arioactive atoms at uaK
liidge. Tenn. The chemists took
radioactive iodine atoms and work
ed them into the molecules of the
plant regulators. The "built-in
radioactivity put a "mark" on the
chemical regulator. Standing by
with Geiger counters, the chemists
now are "tracing" the regulators,
"watching" them go to work on
pla nts.
'Black Widow' Can Fool Doctors
By FRANK CAREY
Associated Press Science Reporter
WASHINGTON Surgeons have
sometimes been fooled by the bite
of the Black Widow spider.
The excruciating pain in the
abdomen produced by the bite of
the venomous "widow" has at times
been mistaken for the pain of some
organic ailment, says Lieut. (JG)
Dallas E. Billman in the Naval
Medical Bulletin.
Some victims of the Black
Widow are subjected to need
less operations, he says, as a re
sult of diagnosis of acute appen
dicitis or rupture.
"The excruciating abdominal
pain renders the patient willing tc
submit to any surgical procedure
which he believes will relieve his
pain," Dr. Billman adds.
He recommends that doctors al
ways consider the possibility of
"Black Widow'' bite in case of
acute abdominal pain, and that
close attention be paid to possible
heart effects in proven cases of
such bites.
"More of these cases will prob
ably be encountered in the fu
ture with greater frequency," he
predicts, citing a report of a
group of doctors, made in 1936,
which said the Black Widow is
greatly increasing in number and
is invading large cities.
cod ' ef ' e77c J
Dr. Billman says research sliows
that tiie venom 01 the female is 15
times as potent as the venom of
the rattlesnake."'
The female spiders destroy the
smaller males soon after mating.
Male "Black Widows" can bite, but
their bile is nor cangerotis.
The "Black Widow" also is call
ed the "hour-glass spider," from a
marking shaped like :"i hour-glass
on their bellies.
DIAPKRS TO AFRICA
hi- usei
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ANDERSON, S. C. (UPl An
Anderson firm is now supplying
diaper service in darkest Africa.
1'ive hundred dozen diapers were
-shipped to a South African whole
sale house from McGee and deck
ley, local exporting firm which also
is solving three-cornered problems
of i lor customers in r.cuncior, Norway
and Sweden.
Ex-Pupils To Have Voice
In Running High School
CHAMPAIGN, 111. (UP i Cham
paign high school officials are giv
ing "old grads" a say-so in plan
ing the curriculum of their alma
mater.
Graduates in all walks of life
have been asked, by questionnaire,
to tell what high school courses
were valuable to them and what
courses proved of little benefit.
School officials plan to tabulate
the information, revamp the pres
ent course of study and do a "bet
ter job" of teaching future pupils.
Capital Letters
(Continued From Page Two)
issue. He said "No!" and thus re
fused to give the ambitious Re
publicans more fuel for the fire
that they are now in the process of
building under the Democratic
Party in North Carolina.
Il Ni l 1(1
it "iil.ili i's With the exception of Califor
,n oiiK -is . ! nia. the Philippines yields more
imti iI dm--1 gold annually than any state in the
i lin iicd ; the union as well as Alaska.
!ll; TO BUM) OR REMODEL?
il to lu ll) You with your remodeling or building
j fsl miu in srlecting the materials you will need.
(Ml. OX IS FOR ESTIMATES
PHONE 539
YWOOD COMPANY, INC.
isod Ruilding, Plumbing, Heating Contractor
OLD-TIME JITNEY DRIVER
RECALLS CROWDED DAYS
SEATTLE iL'Pi --- Frank Cross
has been a cab driver in Seattle
for 38 years and remembers the
old 5-cenl days when a jitney driv
er could crowd 12 to 14 riders
aboard a Model T Ford and no
body complained.
Cross said you could "pile 'em
in the front seat, two deep and
three wide, jostle and crowd 'em
and step on their feet."
"Nobody cared, they thought it
was sport," Cross said.
"But it's different these days.
They sit in the back alone and
untrodden and complain about
your driving. People weren't nerv
ous in the old days."
SERVING HADDOCK
One and one-half pounds of had
dock fillets are needed to serve five
people. If they are to be broiled
they may be dusted with flour and
basted with butter or fortified mar
garine during the broiling. If they
are not to be served witll a sauce
they should be garnished with a
wedge of lemon.
ODD JOB MAN PRODI CES
CASH ON DEMAND
INDIANAPOLIS i UP) Police
were called to settle a tenant
landlord dispute over $1 .SO,
"How much cash do you have
with you now?" a patrolman asked
the tenant, Edgar Martin, 39-year-old
handyman.
"About $500," was the reply.
"Let's see." demanded the skep
tical cop.
"From the two pairs of pants lie
I was wearing, Martin pulled a bill
fold, four money bags and assorted
cash.
A count revealed nine $"0 bills,
31 $20 bills. 120 $10's and hundreds
of $1 bills, each folded separately.
The total: $2,984 -Martin's sav
ings from 20 years of odd-job work.
(Continued from Page Two)
guignan, east of Cannes . . .
Also at Florence and Anzio,
Italy, at Tunis, North Africa, and
in the Philippines at Manila.
The commission is responsible
only for the construction and
maintenance of cemeteries in for
eign countries, but General North
pointed out that four others on
American territory are being con
templated in Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
Alaska and Guam.
Cemeteries in the remote Paci
fic islands, he says, have been va
cated or are being vacated.
"We feel," he says, "that there
are places in the world that are
going down in history with Get
tysburg and Antietam, such as
Tarawa, Iwo Jima and Okinawa.
"On the other hand, there is
no use building a monument if
nobody is going to see it. Those
places are relatively inaccessible
and we feel they should be marked
in some way that is simple, that
does not invite vandalism and
does not, require maintenance."
The commission secretary said
the number of dead to be buried
overseas had not yet been deter
mined. "Originally we estimated 25
per cent; now we are estimating
50 per cent," he says. "This means
three and three-fourths times as
many graves as for World War 1."
The Battle Monuments Com
mission is also responsible for the
operation and maintenance of
eight World War I American mil
itary cemeteries in Europe, con
taining the graves of 30,908
American dead of that war.
It operates and maintains the
Mexico City American National
Cemetery which contains the
graves of some 1.500 Americans
who died in the 1847 Mexican War.
4
Use Want Ads for quick results.
One of the greatest revolutions
in farming methods in the Inst
decade is the tractor-drawn hay
baler. Approximately 32 per cent
of last year's hay crop was baled
in the field.
Floral Tribute
FILM AND STAGE Actress June Lock
hart poses with a bunch of sweet
peas, named after her, al the Inter
national Flower Show in New York.
The new sweet pea Is the result of
ten years of experimentation find
development. (International)
Rambling
(Continued from Page Two)
the cross word puizle, cannot
understand its lure. But ask a
bookkeeper what is the most ex
citing thing about her work and
she will tell you that it's getting
a trial balance. There you are;
there's the answer. It's that un
certainty that forces you to
make "ends meet". To take two
extremes and make them come
together to form a complete
result. In other words, it's the
gambling instinct that is part of
all of us.
Having had a sea captain for a
grandfather, we grew up Under
traditional "signs of weather".
They laughed at us the other day
when clouds hung low and rain
was pelting down, and we predict
ed that it would clear up within
an hour or so . . . because smoke
was going straight up. Well, with
in an hour the struggling sun was
warming up our sodden spirits . . .
it might have been pure luck but
it helped us out.
THIEVES TAKE IT EASY
REXBURG, Ida. (UP) Thieves
who broke into Woody s Drive Inn
took time out to fix themselves two
hamburgers on the electric grill
and dish up a couple of milk
shakes. When they got through
with eating, they took $12 from
the cash register, picked up $25 of
merchandise and left.
A dollar today buys 15 tunes as
much light as it did 20 years ago,
the lighting industry claims.
Your
Washing Done Automatically
Willi a HENDIX Automatic Washer
For As Little As
20c A WEEK
ROGERS ELECTRIC CO.
Phone 4(il
Your Bcndix Dealer
Main Street
CRAWFISH CP A TREE
ELBERTON. Ga. (UP) W. H.
Yeager found a crawfish stranded
on a peach tree six feet above the
ground after a hard rain. Yeager
said he doesn't know whether the
creature crawled up or was rained
down.
Ul
dva nee -Design Trucks
W DC 3 mil
Mife D(l frr, ,wt fief mew mi ieer feefretl
KD SYNCHRO.
f MISSION in h.ovv.
"' x.w op.ra(ns
OtUMN GEARSHIFT
'. driv.B, .
ATED PARKING
J" "or ar0, ,o()y
r SHArT ATTACH-
MENT TO WHEEl HUB ( grMttt trnglh
and durability In ttftavy-dvty mdl.
NEW IMPROVED VAIVI-IN-HEAO
ENGINE hat grtatw dwrabilily uni
Una HlcUncy.
THE CAB THAT "BREATHES" Frh
lf haarad In cald waanSar ii draw
in end vtad air tarcad aaH
Plus Uniwald, aH-lal tab can-h-uclien
Naw, baaviar taring Fult
flaatinf hyaald raar axlaa SaacraHy
datignad Waka BaMkaarinfl traarinf
Wida Itata whaala and May arharil
n-i tpiitmjl ml aifr cerJ.
Him.t-TTll
Among all
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ducers, only Chevrolet brings
you Advance-Design with the
latest and greatest features
of advance engineering, plus
this matchless premium of
production and sales leader
jhip fhe fewest prices in the
voom field! Here are trucks
with comparable equipment
ond specifications that list for
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tome mode's ai much at
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in our showroom.
EVROLET wr5 FIRST!
These Plumbing and Heating Dealers
Invite You To Attend The
Farm amid Home
Aooliaece
FRIDAY SATURDAY
March 19 March 20
Show
When In Need Of
Plumbing, Heating or
Water Systems
CONTACT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DEALERS
FREE ESTIMATES
( NO OBLIGATION
These Dealers Feature Nationally Advertised Products,
and Have Efficient Mechanics and Engineers To Ren
der Satisfactory Service
WAYNESVILLE CANTON
Floyd Miller
Hyatt Brother:
Underwood Lumber and
Supply E.M. Lloyd
W. F. Strange
rs
SYLVA
E. L. Erwin
P. D. Deweese
Smathcrs Plumbing Co.
Young and Brookshire
Annus Chevrolet go.
J
' Main Street
    

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