North Carolina Newspapers

    TUESDAY
PAGE TWO
THE WAYNESVILLE MOUNTAINEER
u,.i
THE MOUNTAINEER
Main Street Phone 78
v 1 Waynesville, North Carolina
The County Seat of Haywood County
Published By
I THE WAYNESVILLE PRINTING CO.
W. CURTIS RUSS Editor
W. Curtis ituss and Marion T. Bridges, Publishers
PUBLISHED EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY
HAYWOOD COUNTY,
One Year
Six Months
One Year..
$3.0
1.75
NORTH CAROLINA
Six Months .
OUTSIDE NORTH CAROLINA
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$4 50
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Enterwi at the post office at Waynesville. N C. as Ser
ena Class Mail Matter, as provided under the Act ol
4l3rch 2 lB7a. November 20. 1914
Ooitiiaiy notices, resolutions o( respec '.anl ot ttianka,
a.ia all notices of entertainment tor proht, will be charged
lor i tne rate of two cents pe- word
" MEMBERS OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AND THE UNITED PRESS
in Associated Press and I'rited Press are entitled es
illusively to tne use for re-publication ot all the too'
news printed in tins newspaper, as well as all AP and UP
news dispatches
TUESDAY. MARCH 29. 1949
These Modern Spellers
A revival of speifu matches seems to be
underway in Hay wo; -d. And it is a good thint;.
because everyday there is a irrowint; evidence
ct an increasing "crop" of bad spellers.
Yesterday in a letter to the editor, the word
phase" was spelled laze." But that did not
cap the one where a hi-h school student, in
all seriousness wrote "pancv" for "pants'.
We have our pet boners, which at times it
seems almost impo.Mb'.e to .et correct, but
then there is always the feeling that no
matter how hard we irv. those typographical
errors still creep in to mix up the simplest of
words.
Printer's note thai is just like an editor
to say errors are the fault of the linotype
operator. Wonder who he thanks corrects his
spelling in the first place'?
Editors note there's no use tryinu to have
the last word with an operator, as they set
the type, while editors merely write the copy.
You win. Mr. Printer.
They'll Do Ir Every Time
TwE IMMWIDDYS
LOVED UMMSIF
WE WASIUESQ.
CWN BUT ONLY
A FEW CP TMBG
FCIEND5 kWEW
TMAT LITTLE
SOAKEY WAS
AM ADOPTED
BABY-
A Gross Instill
During the recent strikes in the bakeries
of New York, the women of that metropolis,
helplessly dependent on the mechanisms
of a great city, were hard put to it to supply
their families with bread.
The poor editor of the New York Times
stepped gallantly into the breach an,.appar
ently with a straight face, informed the be
nighted women of the city that corn mufffins
were a good substitute for bread.
To any true southerner, them's fightin'
words. If the food editor of the Times is try
ing to start the Civil War all over again,' she
could not have selected a bettejr. cause celebre.
When ajsoutherner sitsxlown to supper on
a cold winter evening, he has reached the
desideratum of gastronomic happiness when
the maid sets before him dishes of collards
properly cooked with remnants of a ham,
hock, butter beans, and corn muffins split
open, with a slab of butter melting on eachj
half, and for dessert a spoonful of honey
spread on a buttered muffin.
Incidentally, you have never really eaten
collards if they were not seasoned with ham
hock. If you have a family that won't touch
them, just try cooking them with ham hock
and watch husband and children gobble with
gusto.
And those butter beans not baby limas,
but the big ones should be cooked in the
same pot with the leftovers from the lamb i for best answers in error contest
shoulder that you had for the previous day's Psrcd byjrhen.untainou-.
dinner. ... , ,
Miss Ruin Williams wins first
But to get back to corn muffins. We are ' place and Miss Curinne Wagenfeld
vmt ifninn to 'ot into an armimpnt about h ', wins second place in recitation
By Jimmy Hatlo
,, yys-
( YOliB CEFEkENCES HAVE BEEN W WM
1 APPROVED-MOW JUST SIGN THE Ja"" stf"'
pSssSL. ADOPTION PAPERS, AND THE J ' .fay
fX LITTLE BUNDLE OF JOY IS f' v ' 3
Rambling V
j Bits Of Human Interest News Piok.j ,
Of The Mount,!,. ... I" l
UT-THOSE WHO DIDMT
KWOW SOMETIMES
ALMOST GAME TO
BLOWSASTOWWICR
r PAGENJT LITTLE :
SOAKBV BESEMSLED"
Tmawx to
1
A CUIPOPF THE OLD BLOC IP Y RIDICULOUS? WES THE
I EVEB SAWOME.' LOOK AT THAT SPITTIM6 IMAfiEOF HIS
, NOSE.LOOk; AT THAT BEND IN HIS 7 MOTHER! SAME
HEADVDU'D KNOW TWEY WERE SAME LOM6 FINGECS.
FATHE AND SOM, IN A
DACK R00M
tD SAY A
LITTLE O
BOTW.'GOT
HIS MOM'S
LOOKS AND HiS
5 6A)5
fPIUNU4 "ft
is
' ' COW ulyc Ft.iV1
Vacation days will soon be loom-' li;K , t
ing up on the calendar and every j ui,dt.r
one will be looking at folders ami a,,., .
aavertisins muiil-i. ii " mways sun,,. u( ' "q
been a matter of conjecture Whelli-1 'ruuii Th,J
er us Waynesville-ltes could find a all, ,n t h ' f "i
finer place in which to spend our ; ymi d(mt "(
vacatipn time: We haver everything I This dot-rt
to offer that we will find in any ;t,-r,)SS "
descriptive maiiei ui uura iuea- iuie a as)
tions: scenery, cool nights and
pleasant days; all the eomtorts
(literally) of home!
itaii
Looking -Back Over The Years
Co-operation is the motor that
turns the wheels of progress.
The lady's frock vas the center
of admiration at the parly and the
owner proudly said she had made it
herself. She said she had used a
chain-stitch sewing machine and
was delighted. But to the constern
ation of all. a friendly hand caught
a loose thread and before any one
could say a word, the chain stitch
had done its worst and the lady
had a two-piece dress.
Imagination cam make or break
our outlook on life.
Mrs.
15 YEARS AGO
W. C. Medl'ortl wins prize
because we know of no
contest sponsored by the Commun-
Miss Maria Garrett of Greensboro,
return to Salem College after
spending Easter holidays here.
Misses Elizabeth and ErUia Gar
rett return to Greensboro College
after spending the spring holidays
at home.
VOICE
OF THE
PEOPLE
"Busy Learning To Live"
Judge Frank Smathers gave all of us some
thing to think about in his recent article that
has been published in two magazines of
national circulation.
We think Judge Smathers gave a very fit
ting climax and ending to his article, by stat
ing. "I have been busy learning to live again."
Too often, we are prone these days to be
come too busy to learn to live. We are busy
ti ving to acquire something for a time out
yonder when we think we will have time to
relax, and live.
Not long ago. a Waynesville man was re
buked by a person who looks for beautiful
landscapes, and other things of beauty in
nature, because this man had never noticed" a
view from the top of a certain hill. His ex
planation for failing to see the view was this:
"When I pass that spot. I am usually going
51) miles an hour, and have my eyes on the
road, and not views."
For ten years he had driven the same route
daily, and yet never saw what a stranger ob
served the first time.
We feel that many of us will find happiness
in adopting the 'closing lines of the Judge's
article: " busy learning to live."
u j ;
colli Ol eiiii lfcipf. urvdUM wc ino 01 nv .. ,,,,,h oi..ic in , u., v .,,.,,
subject that will stir up as much dissension j viHe High School.
as the recipe for corn bread, unless, perhaps, j
it is a debate amontf irardeners about the I Miss Babbie Way and guest,
proper way to raise tomatoes. For the old
rhyme about some like it hot, some like it
cold, and some like it in the pot nine days
old, applies precisely to corn bread.
Some will have no egg in it; others abhor
any addition of flour; and no southerner can
abide sugar in his corn bread. Some like it
In muffins, some in the pan, some cooked in
advance in huge pones big enough to last the
family a week, and still others dote upon fried
corn cakes.
Without intending, therefore, to take sides
in this perennial controversy, we offer here
the recipe of a Negro cook famous for her
corn bread:
"I takes a cup of meal and a cup of flour,
adds a pinch of salt and a dab of baking powd
er and sifts 'em together. Then I beats one
aig into the dry stuff and adds just enough
milk to mix it. If I has buttermilk, I mixes a
smidgeon of soda into it. Then I has my
sho'tenin already melted and pours it into
the batter so hot that it bubbles and sizzles,
and I stirs it in fast. Then it's ready to pop
into a.blisterin' hot oven.
"How much sho'tenin? Well,- befo' it's
melted, bout the size of an aig laid by a
two-year-old Black Minorca hen."
If you know what she means by a pinch,
a dab. and a smidgeon, how big an egg is
laid by a two-year-old Black Minorca hen,
and the temperature of a blistering hot oven,
you can't go wrong.
When she brings the muffins to the table
with the perfect brown of old gold and so
hot that you caip't lift them with your fingers
but have to harpoon them with your fork, and
when you watch the butter melting on the
two halves, anybody who calls that delicacy a
substitute for bread had better smile when
he savs it. Charlotte Obesrver
10 YEARS AGO
Work starts on two new stores
at the corner of Main and Miller
streets. Hugh Mastic is owner of
the stores.
Forty drivers attempt o laTie cars
over the 45 degree-XT foot bank
next to I.eatlH'iwood-.laims Esso
Station on Main Street.
Haywood Candy Company stock
is damaged by fire.
The morning following the sev-
, irient ol lh Community Council at ; ere electrical storm recently, we
the organization meeting. ! were Deing teaseo ueeause we
Habit am
Hie hard,
df.V life.
, h,r 1 mom
" 'kI what t
Oil lllf o
iH'.al had bf,
'Vfi'al occaska,:
JMrMi. and y
11 was ttJ
had Urn ul
luinuer
0,1 a jb
""( mat iij
w- The
"STOP" M
means humlJ
forf the rid
Local employment
many jobs now open.
office has
Kurt Weill is named secretary of
Sigma Delta I'hi fraternity at
Davidson College.
Billy Kerley is given surprise
party on his sixteenth birthday.
T
By EULA NIXON CREENM
Capital
Oscar Briggs resigns as super
intendent of Town Water System.
Mrs. Hugh A. l.ove is named
president of the Waynesville Music
Club.
Misses Margaret and Edith Hog
len visit parents. Mr. and Mrs. M.
S. Hoglen at their home in Clyde.
Mrs
5 YEARS A;)
Rufus Siler is elected pri'
UNCLE ABE'S LETTER
Do you think the Town Board of
Aldermen should finish renovat
ing the front of the city hall build
injr, or let it remain in its present
condition?
Elizabeth Leathenvood: "Yes. it
should be completed. The other
buildings are such a credit to the t'other day
town that it is too bad not to fin- j fishermen'.1
ish it. The Chamber of Commerce j
and City Hall are so good.'' j
fur you this time, awful good news
fur all you Waynesville fishermen,
seein' as how moast of you air too
fernal lazy to dig yore oan wurms.
I g'ess the Editur wood a liked
to "ave scooped up on this but no,
sir-ee! hit's fur this kolyum x-cloo-sive.
"Why not le's oppyrate a red
wurm-farm." sez Roy Rcece to me
an' s'ply all theze
"Well, we'de haff f have rite
smart track o' Ian' then woodn't
we?" I axt; "how about mv Cherrv
Chartes Camp: "I certainly think I kee rabtit ranch?''
WHAT A MAN! George Coble,
who is the new man on the State
Highway and Public 'Works Com
mission, can have-the job as chair
man if he wishes. But he is a pret
ty busy man. Just how busy was
U ..... Itmt lii i nnaot'snna a f air
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Moody have "
, j.., ..a .n in thP soi-vice days ago before the House Agncul-
v.up,.... . ... . i rn.,,iU.,c. in Wachinot.in I
The former is Mrs. Hilda Moody lu,c v"" ""' Seutt was ild
Leatherwood. yeoman third class, against yenow oieon.a. B me.
and the latter is Leslie L. Moody, j Said George in making his ap
,lr.. seaman second class. ! pearancc: "I operate seven dairy
; processing or manufacturing plants.
11 dairy products distributing
branches, and 21 milk - receiving
plants in the State of Florida, Geor
gia, South Carolina, Virginia, West j 0ne time, he m
Virginia, Pennsylvania, and North to carry his J
Carolina. These dairy - product good housewiii
plants employ auoui i,uu persons, This is about
Howdy, fokes! I've got good news like he cluz when he starts V journ
ruart. then sed, ses he
"Well, don't have yore red wurm
beds or rows to awful dog-gone fur
away frum the hous, so's you can
taeh a wire to th' light-switch er
sump'm whir thar's current. Now,
this wire is tached to a steel rod.
'bout the size of a walkin' cane,
sharp so's you can stave it into th'
grourr. Then you turn th' jooce on
an' ram the rod into th' groun'
here, there an' yander an' you jist
Nut bad lot
And yet so
nerve to saykl
experitnee, etel
as head of ttt
SCOTT REQ
CunimissioMil
some of tie al
thought liintiJ
devices for kee;
before the piu
often took tit:
himbastings gf
nut catch k'i
and process the daily milk supply
of about-10.000 dairy farmers.
"Moreover, I am ar. actual farm
er with 2,100 acres and am present
ly milking about 250 purebred
Guernsey cows. The total purebred
animals on my farm 'number ap
proximately 600 head ... I will
manufacture between 5,000,000 and
6.000,000 pounds of butter per
year. At present values, this butter
producer $2,310,000 per year."
it should be completed."
MIRROR OF YOUR MIND
j?
rzitf?m - v' -1 run n n .i 7
By LAWRENCE GOULD
Consulting Psychologist
you to feel secure will relief it.
Because most of tts have never
since felt as secure as we did in
mother's arms, the average person
finds relief from sleeptcsmess in
whatever Makes him ; feel he's
back there again: quiet, warmth,
food, or the ' presence of some
loved and trusted person.
ts a "laiy" adolecii mentally ill?
Answer: That depends on what
he's "lazy" about and why. Lack
of interest in school wori, for ex
ample, may be due to childishness,
poor teaching, " rebellion against
authority, or a feeling of not hav
ing been accepted by his school
mates. But an adolescent who has
not found anything at all at which
hell- "work his head .off" 4ike
-starting a club, or i getting the
"gym" read for a dance needs
physical or mental treatment. A
It rhere cure for Insomnia?
" Answer: None that works for
everybody. Unless it is due to- or
ganie illness, inability te sleep
comes from a sense of insecurity
Healthy len-ager ought to be bo-. which will not let you "relax" be-
full of enersr that his parents' cause 'you 'must' been cuard
aais problem is to kelp hiaa d xegainet some' real or imaginary i , depends largely ou how promptly
a outlet to It. , . , ::-d";OmageiyaiKi anything tha H helps " they are given.
Do people-fudged "intone"
? often gel well?
Answer: Much more often than
statistics have, appeared -to show,
say members of the staff ol War
ren State Hospital, Warren, Pa.
Figures usually given, out have
been misleading because 'they
have not distinguished between
new and chronic cases. At- Warren
Hospital, fifty-eight pe cent-of all
"new admissions" improvteoough
to be discharged,' evert' though
; they cannot all be called "cured" ,
' coir.pletely. An important point is ,
that -the' success of th newer
forms of treatment for' psychosis
I). F. Whitman: "I think they
should leave that space there for
the present, and then eventually
tear the whole building down and
erect a new Municipal building
that would be a credit to Waynes
ville and Haywood county."
Miss Grace West: "Yes, 1 think it
should be completed.''
"Too fur away." sez Roy.
"Hit don't perdooce good rabbits
an', tharfore, I'de put it in cheep,'
I kontinude.
Then me an' Roy got down t'
bizness de-tales, agrcein' on ever -thing
'cept the matter o' diggin' the
wurms.
"You're younger an' hole lot
more soople than I am, Roy." sez 1.
so s pose you dig in wurms. an
I I'll ketch 'em an put 'em in tans.
Mrs. Lillian Hart: "I do think it , I have a awful week back. Besides
should be finished. The city always I that wood be a hole lot eazier on
wants to make a good appearance you than trampin' way back, onto
and the empty space doesn't look theze mt sides a ter a still.
good."
Bill Hollingsworth: " It would,
certainly improve the looks of the
street if the building was completed."
Theodore McCracken: "Certainly
it should be completed in some
way."
E. J. Lllius: "If they have the
finances, I think the city should
complete the building. The Cham
ber of Commerce is so splendidly
located now that the rest of the
building should be in keeping with
the Chamber of Commerce and the
City Hall."
Roy Parkman: "By all means
complete the building. The rental
income would be quite an item, be
sides the attractive appearance of
the building."
Letters To The
Editor
"I kaint dig em all." sez Row
At this p'inl Shurf Welch slept
up.
"What is it you fellers kaint
agree on?", he axt.
"On whooze f dig th' red wurms
on our " I got that fur when
Roy shuck hiz lied at me I wuz
'bout f let out th' sekrit.
"Well if you-uns air tawkin'
bout dlggin' red wurms. you don't
haff t' do that enny Tnore: thar's a
100 times better way n' that."
But the Shurf woodn't tell what
the way wuz onless we tol" him our
sekrit; so we 'greed f let the
Shurf in on th' deal.
"Now. x-splain." sez Roy,
Shurf sorter frowned a little
one. see me wu ... m. o.m. e , from mv company alone returns to
gus em in ni. , m
Lood me an Roy bowth keep
up a-ketchin".'". I axt.
"Well, mayby," replide the
Shurf. "depen's on whether you
have a rale good crop or not. also
on kind o' seed."
Course this is t' be a close
corp'ra-shun. but if thar's enny
Mt.neer reedurs what have some
rale good red wurni-farm land t'
leese, we wood konsider takin' in
one more pardner.
Yores fur sucksess in ennything
an' ever'thing ye ondertake.
Uncle Abe.
which lie mild
li'iliuted over
plained that i
and her I
York and iUiJ
(jus hotel tbttl
meals at this in
were served II
cake the Nnl
tasted.
Dack home,
would write fc
iContM
MARCH OF EVENTS
i
Firing On Ft. Sumter
To Be Re-enacted
CHARLESTON, S. C. (UP) The I
firing on Ft. Sumter, spark that
set off the Civil War, will be re
enacted in fireworks April 20 dur- I
ing the Charleston azalea festival
The display will be staged at '
the point of the famous Batten
Models of Fts Sumter and John
son will be constructed on small
ships and moved in close to shore
The actual battle was fought on
April 12, 1861. Sponsors hope that
the sham battle will develop ulti
mately into a pageant such as the
Lost Colony show in North Carolina.
HARBINGERS OF SPRING
SOME FACTS ON RURAL. ELEC
TRIFICATION IN HAYWOOD
Editor The Mountaineer:
Your editorial, "Design For Bet
ter Living," which appeared in the
March 18 edition of the Waynes
ville Mountaineer prompts me to
apologize for negligence. Had we
kept you abreast with what our
Company is doing toward extend
ing: electric yService to the rtrral
areas of Haywood County, I am
sure R.KA. would not have gotten
credit for- having done the job
singlehandedly.
" Immediately "after reading the
editorial, I consulted our rural
electrification department and
found that as of December 31, 1948,
6910 rural residents of . Haywood
County Wpre receiving electric
service. Of that number, 2,746, or
approximately '40 per cent of the
(Continued on page three)
Truhion May Hove to Take I EittnhM
Compromiie On Labor Law I May Bill
Special to Cental Puss
wrASmNGTON Congressional observers M
tt President Truman's lashing of Congress w
Taft-Hartley Labor Act sooner, the chief exec
accept a compromise law, or veto it.
Bettlne: is that the law which conies out oi
cry from the administration's original proposal; j
to the Taft-Hartley Act.
It looks like the House will pass the admia
fcnr. It Is a different story in
The ultimate product of a
may be pretty distasteful ty
manded outright repeal of W
paigned on such a pledge-
One of the top Democratic
.. ..... i .... -i.lont 111
aicts- tnai me jjiciu
kin naotprt His reason!
prefer any act to the present
1itin L. Lewis'"
Journal has declared that
is tO be consistent with w"!
m. rnvrimrIOAL SELF"
Pretidsrtt Trumaii Truman's blast at Taft Har
' treti all the otlier major r"
program. The president's Senate majority W
Illinois, believes he has -a solution of the situao
Congress still far front legislative action after
of a session.
1 v..
T i. ,rt for u
uarv to let th Vnomhm "pet the speeches oil
"adjourn for a month and let the committees fi
The maforitv leader noints out that many ri
stand law-making procedure, which involve i "i
viewpoints before various committee m
. . L:nt man
Cfiva InfurmiiMK nn fill i,l. nf a suui' - ..
Lucas said that, In tiew of widespread w J
v-ongresstons' SlwvnesS, he cnecneu v
,w1
aii me commmees are ousy. w.- - &
.. ....j. ...,i for tw
pvaaiuiy can io ges jegiBiauon
EISENHOWER- V'DOWSLAS-Some
are determined W Seek-ndminStion of G
th fifw hi.i,i.tii Muniiti! in 1952 10 '
of five suceessiV:defeatfrom their nfri.J
Many Itey JDifimdcratS. cerUin that r."
another term, rf ' preparing: to counter
Court JusUce. William Oi Douglas
Thus the nolitlcat tomtoms are ,,
three and at halt years before the nation j
i. ...... a ,,nnredictl"'
vycii roun an uiiiuni -In
hiatnrv .M'
j i,rtu'er 0"
The -Republicans believe that Bisenho'
s Columbia university president while tf
military matters, would consent to .-i
they point out. if there is no "hot, shoot" t
Friends of, Douglas. believe the
"mnr than urllKo a k DclllOCrfltl1- , ui
, ...... ....... ,s w u r.. 'ceW
now, and they contend he would be rtf
party. Hs U already the;"darling
trtlbi .would ,(nn frm th i0""1-
    

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