North Carolina Newspapers

    i a peaceful person. I keep my temper In the face ox
- "'""on. Laughter teems a stronger weapon than a sharp
i l...e quarreling or fussing. But there are time when I
, v i.en I see red, get hot under the collar. It doesnt happen ;
4 it is not personal. But when I get roused up at they say, .
i r.-.ady to stand up and fight. '. '' .- -t '
sme reason there have been too many articles in various i
.'.nes and papers lately attacking the younger generation. I'm ted
a read that and here I quote in essence, the young people of
f have no sense of responsibility, they are lazy, they waste their
Me time. Well, do you think that is a new indictment, something
..:;r to this youth of 1954? You can find exactly the same charges
i articles written in 1900, in 1800, eVen in 1700. No doubt even the wise
thought their sons and daughters were not all they ought to .
Le. Tula blaming our children for our own sins has gone on since the
t. sinning of time. It is nothing new. Doubtless our grandchildren will (
raise their hands in horror, at the so-called immorality and heedless-'
ness of the generation that comes after them.
A blanket indictment of the young people of today is a far worse
reflection upon our own generation. If they are failing, it is because
we have failed ourselves. If they are straying from the paths of
righteousness, we showed them the way not by our words but by our
: . actions. We. all learned long ago that the sins of the fathers are
visited upon the children - but we shouldn't blame the children for
, - our own mistakes. ' 1
T A ,,,. ' ....
-.v. The-whole point is, of course, that we want them to succeed where
we failed. AU those virtues we lack ourselves, we'd like . them to
have. Our memories aro notoriously short when it comes to our own
. shortcomings. We can and do get Awfully self-righteous and moral
, when we have passed the age of temptation. Maybe we even resent
that fact , v. .
' '' Here's a sample taken at random from a current magazine - Teen-
- age wild parties shock community.' "Drinking prevalent at college
- houseparty." My; my. How scandalizing Well, I grew up in the 20's
ano5 I have a very good memory. Further' I have attended many
'college houseparties of this so-called wild generation of today as a
. chaperone. I have yet to see one given anywhere that would begin to
.' equal the wildness and drinking in those of the twenties. Necking,
petting, or bundling, it hasn't changed mush as far as I can see for
two hundred years. It's only a question of degree and the words you
use. , '
- No, that' is one bill of goods I Vont buy. I believe that our young
people today are more moral, more honest more truthful than we
' ' aver were. And they not us deserve the credit for it If we don't
" attend church,' We cant blame them for not going. And even if we
ao go, it we nreaK every commandment tne otner six aays in tne
" mti, we net a- sorry example, una uung wai young people ao nave
', is good- eyesight They can see through sham and pretense and lip
- aevice. We just dont fool them. They are brighter than we think.
Ai wey aont snow us wnai we aeem to do proper respect, wnat nave
' . we given them to respect? Too often I have heard a kid accused of
being impertinent for merely asking why. I sometimes think we must
be afraid of their inquiring minds, afraid we will expose our ig
i noranoe.
y ' If this new generation has a fault it is one of omission rather than
commission. It is said that this is the age of anxiety. Why shouldn't
' they be anxious? Born in a depression with their careers inevitably
postponed by service in the armed forces, naturally they are be-
h;s wildered. undpniripri TTaavAn knhwa tfiav will hava airniaMon mi
' the mess we have made for them.. If they seem reluctant to take
-up the burden of responsibility, just consider the terrible responsibili-
ty we nave put on their shoulders. What have we given them to help.
,t bear all the burdens, what wisdom, what strength? We can expand
.' all our energy, our resources, our ingenuity for these young people
and it still won't be enoueh to make uo to them for our failure to
give them a better world, a hope for the future, to insure to them a
legacy that is theirs by their inalienable right a legacy that was
passed on to us, freedom from fear.
t, . On a teen-age panel in recent weeks, one of the wise spokesmen
v, fftr h1 0nnA1fitfnn mala a riofam.nl V. ,..-.. ,A ., oWnnU
. : ing than any of the accusations heaped upon the heads of our youth.
' He said, that not only was his the age of anxiety but it could also
: be called the age of apathy. Young people today, he said, lacked
spirit lacked courage, lacked the will to stand up and fight. When
he said that I was shocked, and sick at heart. I felt as if the youth
f the world were looking straight at us, straight through us. They
, were weighing us, and we were found wanting. Like all young ani
mals they have been quick to sense the smell of fear in their
Ciders. A fear that seems to grow stronger daily, a fear that hangs like
a pall over the country, a fear has sapped the courage of many of
our leading statesmen, our politicians, even our army.
. No Wonder these kids shake their heads in bewilderment. They
are not Stapid. They can see the evil shadow of a sinister senator
weakening the very things that made our country great. They see
, men judged without due process of law, bullied by a tyrant filled
with a lust for power. And we do nothing. Let us face it honestly.
We lack the guts to do anything. Worse," when a few courageous
people dare raise their voices, we refuse to back them up.
These young people look at the sordid spectacle of an honored and
decorated general insulted and treated shamefully because he obeyed
oders .from his superior officers. And the head of the army who
dared back him up, who dared protest the shabby treatment of this
man who had served his country honorably and well, slapped down
by the administration, made to crawl and grovel in the dust before
the feet, of a power-mad politician. And they turn, these young
i people, and look at us to see what we are going to do about it.
They read, too, and they listen. And they read and hear these
' words from the London Times. "Joe McCarthy was able to do what
neither Burgoyne nor Lord Cornwallis could, he defeated the army
of the United States." "What the Japanese and the legions of Hitler
and Mussolini could not accomplish, this senator did, he made the
U.S. Army back down."
,' Shades of our forefathers! We might use the words of William
Vaughn Moody in protest.
; Was it for this our fathers kept the law?
'This crown shall crown their struggle and their ruth?
Are we the mighty nation Milton saw
Mewing its mighty youth?
' j . . O ye who lead
' Talra fcauulf
u we nave really become so weak, so spineless that we are afraid
to act now, then perhaps we should take down the Star Spangled
Banner and run up a white flag. It is the flag of the free, and ought to
, '- wave over the home of the brave. We owe it to our children and our
V ebildrens children to take our stand. That yoke of the tyrant we
1 threw off is setting on our shoulders too heavily. It is time we threw
" it off, time we showed a little courage and spunk, time we showed
ur lads that we still have in us the spirit of liberty, time we proved
we're not afraid to fight for it.
HELEN CALDWELL CUSHMAN
THE DUPLIN TIMES
nablithed each Thursday in KenansviUe. N. C Canty Seat at
DUPLIN COUNTY
Mtterlal, business office and printing plant, Kenansrtlle. N. C
" ' ' , I. KOBEBT GRADY, imrrnii mrintm
Baser At The Past Office. lUaans-ille, N. C
V tt, a '4
TEUraONE-eiiaBSTule. Day Z5S--Nlght (1M
BUBSCWPTION BATES IJ.il per year la DapUa. I tinsar.
f Onslew. Pander. Sampson. New Baaatw and Wayaa
a-Mtfea tU per rear eattUe thin ana Ja Neat Carolina:
and ffcM per year alewBuie, . r t .a t,i
Adra41siBff rates faralshed aa reaneat
ADapta Coaaty Janraal. devated to the rellgiooa, saaterlal.
0!?ma' ",mom,0 eJTiealtnral derelomaeat a Dnvlla
- jou ...mn Hi
GALILEO ON THE HOT SPOT
: ' '..-I .of noultrr science at N. C State
-DAILX CROSSVOHD
1 "( ACSOSS '"-'4.Herdot', 22. Half an em
.c 1. Part of a ' whales - 23. Samarium
- locomotiva . 5. Melody Uym.)
4. Choking bit Affected - 24. Mexlcrl.
T.Husk bytlaa , tree ,,,
; S.Maeawa',;' T.Aboundins; 25. Grata
10. Name ,''" in hills , ( 2. Banishment
' 1). Pogs t. Cubic meter' 2T, Pinaceoua -
13. Foreigners 1 10. Dutch treea
IS. On the ocean ' dialect 23. River '
Poultry Housing
The path of the busy poultry
man is strewn with opportunities for
mistakes.. Mistakes are made every
day and they're costly," says R. S.
Dearstyne, head of the department
of poultry science at N.
College.'1
. Dearstyne says one of the cost'
liest of poultry management mis
takes is made by the busy 'producer
who "forgets" to clean and disinfect
his brooder house between each
group of chicks raised.
"It is a well-established fact that
worav eggs, coccidia and. certain
disease-producing bacteria and vir-
- n i m ' mr a -it i i i
QUESTION: What can I do to
avoid an outbreak of leucosis in
my chickens?
ANSWER: Leucosis is caused by a
virus. There are some five different
types affecting chickens in North
Carolina. For control first of all,
try to secure chicks from a source
that is free or reasonably free of
the disease. Then brood chicks away
from old hens' and where there is
no traffic from the old hen house
to the brooder house or where
traffic is not across. infected grounds
and into the brooder house. The
main thing is to try to minimize
the possibility of infection the first
12 weeks of the chicks' life. If this
is done, leucosis will not cause the
losses that otherwise would result.
Grow pullets on clean, green range.
Place them in a laying house that
has been thoroughly cleaned, disin
fected and rebedded with six inches
of sawdust, or preferably dry wood
shavings. Have roosting racks en
closed with wire so that birds do
not have ready access to droppings.
Then support these measures of
sanitation with a rigid culling pro
gram. The removal of all birds at
the first sign of leucosis will retard
the spread of the disease in the
laying house.
QUESTION: How can I recognize
leucosis in my chickens?
ANSWER: After birds have start
edto lay notice their eyes as you
cull out the non-producers. Grey
eyes with an irregular shaped pupil
should be culled. Do not mistake
pearl eyes or blue eyes or off
colored eyes for the ocular type of
leucosis, but pay close attention to
the shape of the pupil. If the out
line of the pupil is very Irregular
and begins to fade back into the
iris of the eye, then this Is the be
ginning of the ocular type of
leucosis.
It. Malt
beverage
IT. Period
of time
19. Assam , '
pilkwornt .
2a River (Ft.)
v2L Conveyed,
aa by deed
23. Region
of Africa
15. Recollect
28. Apex -.
3L Hewing tool.
' 82. Ever (poet)
34.8hadeof
a' color
84. A faction
37. Payment
back -89.
Dish ; '
41. Dromedary.
42. Sea eagle
43. Biblical "
(S.Afr.1 . (Eng.
12. Spoke , ' 29. Outside
14. Maker of 30. Remove " V
saddles the skin '
18. Affirmative 33. Cap again .
vote , 3.8ptritlamp,
Sat Ucwjr't asserts
1 "
3& Alkaline dip '
for hides ',
40. Lamprey
10 .A 'X, il .
ZZ llZZZ
10
44.Salt(chem.)
45. root-like
t. part ,
DOWN
tAttricUv
UtUsgirl ,
(slang)
2. River (Bur.)
8. Mingle -
WAww,
uses will live for an undetermined
period of time on floors, walls and
equipment of brooder houses once
they become so Infected,'' explains
Dearstyne. Following one group of
chicks in a brooder house by an
other without a thorough cleaning
and disinfecting of the house and
equipment invites trouble. . ,
"Overcrowding of houses is also
common fault of many- poulty-
men-JThere should be, at least 94
Sheep Farmers
Average 118
A summary of 53 farm flocks of
sheep in' 12 counties showed that
the average farmer had a 119 per
cent lamb crop, his ewes sheared
6H pounds of wool, returned him
gross income of $23.90 and cost him
$738 upkeep.
A study of this survey shows that
progress -is being made in some
phases of sheep production, but
other' important practices are being
neglected. 70 per cent of these flock
owners had small grain or other
cover crops for winter grazing. 80
per cent fed ewes grain before
lambing. 92 per cent fed grain after
lambing, 76 per cent fed lugume or
mixed hay.
Only 30 per cent creep-fed lambs
and only 35 per cent sold lambs in
July. More lambs should be creep
fed for a higher degree of finish
and marketed earlier for greater net
return.
Zwes should be drenched 2 to 8
times per year to control internal
parasites. Early May is best time
to shear the sheep.
76 marketed lambs through coopers.'
tive pools and 84 per cent marketed
wool through wool pod Is for re
duced marketing costs.
' Because of, good return on low
Initial investment per head, sheep
are a growing supplementary farm
enterprise.
IULi .w for
r33-f.lASOnRY
Leon Js Simmons
Hardware a
In Mt. Olive
THE WORLD'S BEST TOBACCO CURERt
i
OIL BURNING TOBACCO CURER
twA So Vntuch!
LOWER INITIAL COST
LOWER COST UPKEEP
LOWER FUEL CONSUMPTION
LOWEST FIRE-LOSS RECORD
GREATER WEIGHT IN CURED TOBACCO
GREATER OPERATING EFFICIENCY
GREATER HEATSPREADER AREA
.for PnZt I'.: D .ton In '54
.,.
If Yea IzstcH Florence-Mayo!
yuscfjztxJ FrOTwticoMayo Dealer :
J. R. DAVENPORT
"Farm & Home Supply"
Phone 2129 '
Deep Run,N. C.
Keep your FARMALL
pulling like newl -
tVITIl OUR II! 5-5TAR
-Jt rti t sV . " t,,jt
a
! Rettore "liletw";:owet- and per-
fmM to your MrCormifk rarmsll
' with a thorough overhaul NOW ...
! before heavy field work begins. We
check your tractor carefaUT from front
' wheels to drawbar . 'i . Aa onVf the
work thar's needetLiYoa can depend
oa oat IH-traiaed aervicenen, 1H-,
: approved terrk tquipment and In'
precisio&ngineefed para to maintain
the fine performance built into your
FarmalL AU m P TVy
I', !(' -: ; tjirfc-SM't
T '
WALLACE MOTOR
& IwPLEIiEUT CO.
WALLACE, N; C
4 V
square feet of floor apace per blrdJ
for the first ten weeks. One square
foot per bird would be better. "An-
ouier great error,' according -to
Dearstyne, "is that of overheating
chicks. The baby chicks is not a
'hot house' animal. Too little atten
tion is given to temperature regula
tion. While t j must be
correct for good t uj, the quicker
the chicks are d away from
heat, within reason, tne more vital
the chick. Culls will occasionally
appear among growin gbirds. Uany
culls are devitalized, which, in turn,
indicates high susceptibility to dis
ease. Becaufj, of this the cull bird
usually is a menace of flock health.
-"V f " f k "
WW WVr.v WW '
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Ti'Sal-eMap I "-as
l....MM-lMJWiw Ul Ea....HJ . f
t v. i w
1 timaJt kat-..,BSltJ " : . ' i :
' 7 ' , - -'V if 'r
Complete . Stocks of " v
Freoing - Siding - Fleering 7 .
Ceiling end o:Iding!sK
v Special - Economy Grade
No. 2 Com. Pine Flooring
$75.G3p3rliioussnd
Free Delivery,
Call Mt Olive 2935 Now.
. ' - '-" i
. Our reputation was built on
, . "Quality and Service" 1
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9
It -s The Law
(4 i'Jo i'fj;t ft'.
Our automobile liability policies meet all the requirements of
the Financial Responsibility Law which becomes effective January
1,1954.
If you have one of our policies you have all you need. If not see
us about it
A. L. CAVENAUGH PAUL B. POTTER
In Warsaw .
IOOOOOPOOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
t
For County Commissioner
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I hereby announce my candidacy for County Commissioner
from District No. 1, comprising Warsaw and Faison Townships.
I feel that my experience on the Board of Education and as
' . !.' -Jul J : t ' ,Z ; : ': ' I . -. r'. '..vSst; i
County Commissioner enables me to better serve my District and
- i ( j . ....
the Citizens of Duplin County.
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Gates
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