North Carolina Newspapers

    JOHN T. THORNE, A NEW DEAL FARMER!
John 'J'. Thome, u veteran of the
farminK industry, and in whom the
Country Gentleman is ao well typi
fied, has found himself assuming a
new role this ye.,r, a farmer of the
Now Deal, a position, which in a
recent interview, he states is the
most satisfying of any of late years.
Since 'way hack there in the early
dawn of the cooperative system he
has taken considerable interest in its
progress, and has been very active
during the past few years in the
foremost cooperative endeavors; long
a member of the executive board of
the North Carolina Cotton Coopera
tive Ass'n., and an ex-president, he
realized the importance of the organ
ization of the tobacco farmers, and
was prominently identified with the
Cooperative Tobacco Marketing
movement, the platform of which
corresponds with the present pro
gram, but lacked the prestige and
power that could only be shed upon
it by the governmeht.
rni *
mere naa never been a day when
John T. Thorne was too busy with
his own business to drop it all, and
dash up to Raleigh or Washington,
to offer constructive suggestions in
support of, or to strike a blow in
defense of the farmer, and during
the past year, as one of the three
North Carolina members of the Ad
visory committee to the Tobacco Sec
tion of the AAA, he has been
continuously in attendance on the
various conferences with the agricul
tural administration in Washington,
and has been recently appointed as
the Administration member of the
Tobacco Warehouse Code.
Coming closer home, this amazingly
energetic farmer is never too^busy to
pause and assist his farmer friend,
no matter how insignificant and low
ly he may be, to translate into a
comprehensible language the varied
and sundry rulings he receives, which
in complicated phrases, explains the
many new angles and phases of
farming with the government.
An experience, on the opening day
of the tobacco market here this sea
son, impressed Mr. Thorne very deep
ly, revealing as it did the inner feel
ing of the tobacco farmer in Eastern
Carolina?Walking home from to
bacco town, Mr. Thorne heard an old
Negro farmer say in jubilant tones
of infinite relief, "Thank de Lawd
and Mr. Roosevelt, I can see my
way."
The remarks of this humble darkey,
to Mr. Thorne, reflected the first
rays of the light of a dawning day of
hope and happiness, which are clear
ing the vision of the people, as Roose
velt, inspired leader of humanity,
commands them to march out of the
Slough of Despond, and instills faith,
confidence and courage in hearts, dis
mayed and terrified by the "Gorgons
and hydras and chimeras dire,'"
which have overshadowed them dur
ing the past four years.
Mr. Thorne knows the New Deal
in regard to agriculture, and is most
optimistic over its possibilities. In
discussing the farm program, he em
phasized the fact that it was not
conceived by white collared theoreti
cal experts, but is the result of plan
ning by farm groups in collaboration
with the Administration. He advised
against passing snap judgment on its
policies, and stated that many of the
present measures are of a temporary
nature, and that only those that prove
their adaptability and merit, will be
used in the permanent program,
which is to be a challenge to Agricul
ture to think more highly of itself
and to adopt more up-to-date methods
of production and selling.
At the close of the interview, THE
SPOTLIGHT reporter's impression of
the New Deal farmer, as exemplified
by Mr. Thorne, smiling and radiating
cheer and goodwill, was that real
happiness is attained by thinking
wide thoughts of God and humanity,
and feeling deeply for the other fel
low.
A BASQUE PEASANT
RETURNING FROM CHURCH
Oh little lark, you need not fly
To seek your Master in the sky,
He treads our native sod.
Why do you sing, aloft, apart?
Sing to the Heaven of my heart.
In me, in me, in me is God.
Oh stranger passing in your car,
You pity me who come so far
On dusty feet, ill shod.
You cannot guess, you cannot know
Upon what wings of joy I go,
Who travel home with God.
From far off lands you bring your
fare,
Earth's choicest morsels will you
share,
And prize of gun and rod.
At richest boards I take my seat,
Have dainties angels cannot eat.
In me, in me, in me is God.
Oh little lark, sing loud and long,
To Him who gave you flight and
song,
And me a heart of flame.
He loveth them of low degree
And He hath magnified me,
And holy, holy is His Name.
Mrs. de Barry
(Ed. Note?This soliloquy might as
well have been that of the American
farmer.)
JNO. T. THORNE
PUT COUNTY'S '34 TO
BACCO CROP WORTH
$8,000,000 TO GROWERS
Pitt county's tobacco crop this
year will be 30,032.729 pounds, it
was revealed recently by K. F. Ar
nold, director of the local farm de
partment.
The figures were based on allot
ment cards distributed to 1,039 farm
- ers in all sections of the county, but
does not include the poundage of
a few non-signers whose tobacco
will be sold under the Federal tax
act.
Commenting on the value of the
crop, Mr. Arnold suid that to esti
mate the average at 25 cents the to
tal amount of tobacco under con
4.J
tract would bring growers approxi
mately $7,600,000 with a half million
dollars benefit payment to come from
the government. This would bring
the total to around $8,000,000.
Although it waa impossible to say
what the average would be, it waa
hoped it would go beyond the 25
cent mark, giving the growers more
money for their crop.
Mr. Arnold said this is the first
time the department had been able
to obtain a definite check on the
amount of tobacco in this county.
He said with the poundage over a
fourth less than it was last year
the total amount received from the
crop at the estimated 25 cents aver
age would be considerably larger
than last year, and over twice as
much as in 1931 and 1932.
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| "SELL YOUR TOBACCO IN FARMVILLE" |
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* And let us furnish your +
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% Main Street ?:? Farmville, N. C. %
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I WELCOME TO FARMVILLE %
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% and to the %
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?f* Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Mewborn, Managers 4*
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* We Welcome You ?:? Board Reasonable t
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