North Carolina Newspapers

    FARMVILLE ENTERPRISE 1
FARMYILL*. V. C
G. A. Boom, Editor, Owner 6 Mgr.
'
Eve Horton
Virgie P. Gilchrist, Society Editor
lames B. Hockaday
Advertising Mgr. and Staff Writer
Pnbiished by
THE ROUSE PMNTERT
Farmville, N. C.
Subscription Price:
Year $2A0?< Mas. ?1?8 Mos. 60c
All Legal Adv. 6c a Una per
Published weekly and entered as
Second Class MaQ Matter at the
Post Office at Parmville, N. C.,
under Act of March Sid, 1878.
TIME FOR MORATORIUM ON
JOBLESS PAYMENTS
There is something revolting about
the fact that in this day and time,
when jobs are going begging and a
crying need for worlcen exists
everywhere, some persons are collect
ing unemployment compensation
benefits. No honest, upright citizen
begrudges the payment of benefits to
unemployed who have made con
scientious efforts to obtain work and
who are liable to suffer unleqs
financial assistance is obtained from
some source. But reports have come
to us that it is a common practice
for able-bodied workers to quit jobs
and make false representation which
enables them to "qualify" for pay
ments.
The unemployment agencies were
born during the depression and con
stitute one of the great strides the
nation made in social legislation.
To repeal this legislation would be
a step backward and heaven forbid
tliat it ever be done. Abuses, how
ever, should not be tolerated and the
strong arm of the law should- lash
out furiously at those who falsify in
order to receive payments. It be
hooves every law-abiding citizen to
notify the unemployment agencies
of any cases in which persons are
illegally getting checks.
It occurs to us that it might be
wise to declare a general moratorium
on unemployment payments. Let the
funds pile up and be paid when jobs
are at a premium. If those lean
years never come, then turn the
money over to schools and churches
because every day we are becoming
more and more convinced that educa
tion and religion, coupled with
plenty of hard work, are what this
nation of ours needs.
NOT LACKING -COURAGE
Not even Pandora's Box could
have held as many plagues and evils
as have popped up daring the office
tenure of President Truman, the
man who did not want to be presi
dent and who, at the 3tart of his
administration, humbly told the
Congress and the people that he
needed their help in order to fulfill
the duties of the most important
office in the world.
Last Fall and Winter when the
United States seemed to be groping
for a sound foreign policy and the
nation was not taking the lead, as
other countries expected us to do,
in formulating a permanent peace
program. President Truman's stock
dipped and such slurring quips as,
'To err is Truman," were bandied
back and forth, and cartoonists of
opposition newspapers 'ribbed him
as one who lacked courage and did
not even know his own mind.
The President seems to have in
creased in stature in recent weeks
arid a soft pedal has been applied to
the uncomplimentary remarks which
no longer are popular. Placed on
his desk have been two strongly
backed bills which he vetoed and
sent back to Congress. First of these
was the Case Bill. Then came the
emasculated OPA Bill. With these
vetoes, the President sent mesaag
outlining his reasons for disapprov
ing the proposed legislation. His
reasoning was sound and generally
was praised by the press and citizen
ry
The unpretentious, humble map
is more capable than be admitted
and, along with sympathy, deserves
praise for the courage be has dis
played in fulfillment of his duties.
Hi# very humbleness was evidence of
courage and recalls to mind these
lines from James Russell Lowell:
"The wisest man could aak no more
At what age do married people be
come reconciled to the fact that they
an equally different and differently
equal?in short, what is the age of
?enmity?
Man or woman, if you cant say
"No" yon moat take the
"Now is the time as M*er before
0 extend the nee of temporary grai
ny crops for hoes," said Dr. Roy
x>worn, pasture specialist, at' the
ecent hoy breeders field day sit State
College.
Loworn pointed out that having
togs on pasture is not only a sound
nanagemcnt practice that has bet
??cognized for years, bat now offers
1 way to relieve tile acute feed
ihortage and still grow quality meat.
Although it is too bite to use
rome of the crepe this summer it is
lever too late to plan for the future,
rhe main crops recommended are
listed as follows:
Soybeans: Any leafy variety,
iown in narrow rows, is good. Use
a bushel of seed per sere.
Lespedesa: While this is not the
best grazing crop, it can be used to
advantage except in dry periods.
Kudsu: A new plant for hog graz
ing and one that gives excellent re
sults when properly used.
Alfalfa: This king of the hay
crops is very satisfactory for hog
grazing. It can be grown on any
well drained soil, but due to its a
grvwlh must be fertilised
heavily with lime, phosphate and
Tadino Clover: Another new plant
which makes an excellent growth
suitable for forage. The seed are ex
pensive, |S.60 a pound, and 2-4
For winter grazing, rye grass and
crimson clover are still the best we
have. They should he sown early,
seeded heavily, 16-20 pounds of clo
ver and 26-30 pounds of rye grass
per acre, and fertilised liberally.
One can expect plenty of potatoes
at the J. T. School, Concord, Route
2. The school endeavors to pro
duce enough vegetables and fruits
to meet its requirements. This year
1,800 bushels of-potatoes were har
vested.
Give s married man a little free
dom and hebecomes suspicious.
If sugar is lacking, try, drying
some of the fruit on hand. Peaches
can be dried in the oven or out in
the sun successfully, and delicious
pies can be made from the dried
fruit.
Kay Savings Boi
ads Now Ai
ad Save
ROD AND GUft '
By Tom Walker
Looking to Morehead. . . Sporta
?on of thelM^ita Have their eyes
toned to Moreheed City, where next
week's seeeipn July 22-23-24 of. the
Board of Conservation and Develop
ment will Mag forth the final say
so on hunting regulations for the
approaching season.
The board will hear recommenda
tiona of the Division of Game and
Inland Fisheries for a curtailment
in kCl through shorter seasons and
bag limits on some game species.
The division's proposals, made in
January so that sufficient time
would be allowed to sportsmen to
speak their minds on the subject, are
based on the problem of maintain
ing adequate breeding stock in the
face of an anticipated step-up in
hunting pressure.
Hot spot will be recommendations
for cuts in seasons on deer, quail,
turkey and rabbit. Already at pub
lic meetings, representatives of the
division and the board have listened
to various suggestions, including the
desire for better law enforcement
and a.request for lay days for the
hunting of all game species. All in
formation and recommendations of
hunters will *be presented to the
board? Commissioner John D. Find
lay will outline the division's pro
posed changes.
^ ? ? ? *
The rains cams . , ; The epidemic
of rains which came with July has
thrown a shadow on the fishing
picture in Borne sections of the
State, especially in the east, but
there are still some bright spots.
Robeson county comes up with a
"first" for the distaff side. Miss
Lois Kinlaw caught a 16-inch hick
ory shad in Lumber River with Hook
and line. This was the first shad
ever caught that high up in the Lum
ber, according to E. W. Came, fish
and game protector.
The waters of Catherine Lake
yielded a black bass weighing nine
and a half pounds, 27 inches nu
girth, reports Protector Lonnie
Koonce of Onslow county.
Up in the mountains there were
reports of fine catches of rainbow j
trout. Wayne Rogers of Waynee
ville took one of 24 inches and one
of 19 1-2 inches, and Charles M.
Crook of West Asheville, Route 3,
brought in a string of^ eight averag
ing 18 inches in length and nine
pounds in weight.
Rogers had a real battle with hid
24-inch rainbow, wnich he took from
Cataloochee Creek. It took him 20
minutes and the help of others in his
party to bring in the big boy. He
was fishing with Floyd Woody of
Canton, and Hugh Rogers of Clyde.
Less than an hour's fishing gave
Crook his good string which he took
from Frozen Lake, near Rosman.
New Hanover winners announced
. . . June winners ,in the New Han
over Fishing Club contest have been
announced:
Zone A Channel Baas?Top catch,
20-pound, four-ounce fish caught by
B. L Bell; second and third places
A. R. Spital. Virginia mullet?one
pound, four ounces, J. D. James;
second, Mrs. R. R. Shepherd. Trout,
three pounds, J. D. James; second,
Ed Davis.
Zone B. Channel bass?42 pounds,
sight ounces, O. E. Durant; second,
George Canady; third, H. F. Janes;
Bluefish?one pound, eight ounces,
George Osnady; second, George Ca
nady; third, J. C. Moore. Virginia
mullet?one pound, 12 ounces, W. T.
Croom.
Fresh water?rock, ? F. E. Living
gtonjjsass. Wt E. Bunn; jick, Har
dy Latimer, Jr.
' .? ? ? ?
More rain trouble. . . Fishermen
aren't the only ones who are looking
anxiously- at the skies after the
month's heavy rains. Damage to the
quail and turkey crop is feared in
many sections.
Protectors Alex Davis Of Cart
eret county and Eugene Jones of
District 11 (Chatham, Lee, Moore
and Randolph counties) have dis
turbing reports on possible damage
to game, and Protector Lester A.
Pierce of Pasquotank county, al
though reporting food conditions for
fish and game good at present, drops
a hint of danger ahead if there is
more rein.
Good reports on game birds come
from scattered sections.. Protector
H. Grady Farthing, noting the fin
est crop of young quail on hand that
he has ever seen at this time of
year, says it appears that Hunting
will be good an both quail and
grouse in Watauga, Ashe, and Alle
gheny counties, and on quail in
ilkes. He also reports that ~
ibbits are very much in
lis year.
Protector George Barr of Stokes
iunty reports seeing
isil of the year, i
acts for the fall
Still after them lij. . Fish and
game law violations in North Caro
lina m June declined slightly from
the 1946 peak established in May,
according to records released by C.
D. Kirkpatrick, chief of law enforce
ment of the Division of Game and
Inland Fisheries.
'During June the division's fish
and game protectors obtained 440
convictions, as against 480 for May.
Violators paid out last month
$1,681.70 in fines and $2,813.61 in
court costs, as against $2,152.11 in
tines and $2,696.14 in costs paid in
May.
Largest single type of violation
in June waa fishing without license,
which accounted for nearly one-third
of the convictions. Next was the
taking of underaize fish, of which
about one-fifth of the violators
were convicted.
Waterfowl hunters, note. , . The
1946 migratory bird hunting stamps
have gone on sale in all first and
second class post offices. The stamp
was reproduced from an original
drawing by Robert W. Hmes, artist
for the Ohio Conservation Depart
ment, and features four redhead
ducks, three males and one female.
Dont forget that the stamp is essen
tial if you're going after migratory
game birds?it's illegal to hunt
waterfowl without the stamp if you
are over 16 years of age.
Want Ads!' I
WANTED ? Girl for office
work. Experience desired,
but unnecessary. The Turn
ace Co., Inc., Farmville, N. C.
WANTED: ?A house or an apart
ment by veteran with wife and
4 year-old daughter. Permanent
i residents.?James B. Hockaday, c/o
THE ENTERPRISE.
MILK PRICES ADVANCED JULY 1
TO 29c QUART. Please audi check
promptly for your account. Pecan
Grove Dairy, Farmville, N. C.
OFFICE WORK WANTED ! By
young lady with typing ability.
-Dial 201-1. 2tc
WANTED ? 2 or 3 unfurnished
rooms, now, or by the first of the
year. Permanent. Address Box
115, Farmville, N. C.
7-12-tf
Jeweler and Watch Repairman?G.
F. SUTTON, Room No. 2, Third
Floor, in Bank of Farmville. 2t
SKI HI STOPS RUNNING FITS IN
DOGS os we refund your money.
We know of 'no other guaranteed
running fits remedy. Wheless
Drug Co. (7-5-4tp)
HAVE YOU LOOKED OVER OUR
SPORTING GOODST WE CAR
RY .NEARLY A COMPLETE
LINE.
WESTERN AUTO ASSO. STORE
FRESH BARBECUE FOR SALE
Every Week end by the pound or
plate, also Bafbecued Chickens?
Roy Dixon, West Railroad Street,
Farmville, N. C. 6-14-4tp
MALE HELP WANTED?Man, serve
regular customers with nationally
known grocery and household prod
ucts on local route. Average $40
to $50 weekly. Write Route Mana
ger, P. O. Box 5071, Richmond,
Virginia. (7-5-3tp)
COME IN AND LOOK AT OUR
TOOLS. WE CARgY A COM
PLETE LINE OF GARDEN AND
YARD TOOLS.
WESTERN AUTO ASSSO. STORE
BE SURE TO TUNE IN ON W-P-'T-F
Every Sunday Moniing from 9:30
to 10.-00, and hear about all the new
inventions and when they may be
expected on the market?intermin
gled with songs that are guaranteed
to please.?Western Auto Associate
Store, Farmville, N. C.
Our Friday Special
mrbecned chicken
? ALSO ?
A wide selection -
Choice Foods.
SUNDAY .
ROAST TURKEY
It is cool at The
Royal Grill
"WE STRIVE TO PLEASE"
REPORT OP THE CONDITION OF
THE BANK OF FARMVELLE
FARMVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON JUNE 29, 1946
ASSETS
1. Loans and discounts (including $..~None.... overdrafts) 320,630.64
2. United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 2,073,800.00
3. Obligations of States and political subdivisions 144,086.00
6. Corporate stocks (including $6,300.00 stock of Federal
Reserve Bank) : 6,300.00
6. Cash Balances with other banks, including reserve balances,
and cash items in process of collection 815,933.71
T. Bank premises owned $17,678.55, furniture and fix
tures J1.00 17,679.55
11. Other Assets " 14,695.77
12. TOTAL ASSETS 3,393,024.67
LIABILITIES
13. Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations .. - 2,310,614.80
14. Time depositS/Of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations 369,71^31
15. Deposits of United States Government (including
postal savings) 186,398.99
16. Deposits of States'and political subdivisions 219,751.49
17. Deposits of Banks 63,148.09
18. Other depoeha (certified and officers' checks, etc.) 17,999.24
19. TOTAL DEPOSITS $3,147,627.92
23. Other Liabilities 16,532.00
24. TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including obligations
shown below) : 1. 3,164,159.92
CAPITAL ACCOUNT
86. Capital ? ?.__$ 60,000.00
86. Surplus 1- 125,000.00
27. Undivided Profits " : 38,864.65
88. Reserves (and retirement account for preferred capital)...... 15,000.00
29. TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNT ! 228,864.65
80. TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNT 3,393,024.67
* This bank's capital consists of common stock with total par value of
$50,000.00. v
MEMORANDA
IL Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value):
(a) U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed,
pledged to secure deposits and ether liabilities? ,_$ 364,000.00
(b) Other assets pledged to secure deposits and other lia
bilities (including notes and bills rediacounted and se
curities sold under repurchase agreement) 37,439.76
Sanding and Finishing
?Writ? or Caft
-V:aM
jy
JAY
? '
401 Broad St, Wilson, N. C.
HsTfft
? V- ? '
- -
RJT1''
& ife ^-r;
KSS??
p
^'' '* 1 - RPR
MEE? "fi. .??;?- ZL <,...,- V, ;.
I Know
Ev'ry Body Loves My Baby
Wherever There's Yon There's Me
My Fickle Eye
There's Good Blues Tonight
Don't Be A Baby, Baby
The Wonder Of You
I'm Just A Lucky So And So
The Gypsy
The One That I am
Whatta' Ya Gonna Do?
No Variety Blues
Boogie Woogie
There You Go
Flat Fleet
You Are Too Beautiful
That Chick's Too Young To Fry
The Story Of Ee Bobba Lee Bob
You Stole My-Heart
In Love In Vain
Tex. Beneke A Orch.
R.C.A. Victor 20-1814
Betty Hutton
R.C.A. Victor 20-1915
Tommy Dorsey
R.C.A. Victor 20-1842
Duke Ellington
R.C.A. Victor 20-1799
Sammy Kaye
R.C.A. Victor 20-1844
Louis Armstrong
R.GA. Victor 20-1891
Tommy Dorsey
R.C.A. Victor 20-1715
Charlie Spivak
R.C.A. Victor 20-1918
Deep River Boys'
R.C.A. Victor 20-1863
Johnny Desmond
R.C.A. Victor 20-1867
COME IN AND LISTEN TO YOUR FAVORITES !
ROBERT'S
iaiue Greene, Mgr. ? Phone 479.-7 ? Farmville, N. C.
PHONOGRAPH NEEDLES ! ? EMERSON RADIOS !
WITH NEW, HI8HER
ARMY MY, THOUSANDS
ARE ENUSTIHA!
"MAKE IT A MILUOir
NEW PAY SCALE
?m Njr
hr .
Arm,
Nraan* JOJWV
h
In addition to par thowo at
ri?M: 20% Ineraara tor Sorvleo
Overtone. 50% H Mombar of
Flylnfl or ?lldnr Crawt. 1% In
craasa In Pay for Each I Toart
of Sorvleo.
or Fir* Sergeant
Technical
Staff ;
Sergeant-. . ? .
Corporal . ? ?
Private Fir* date .
>165.00 j
135.00
115.00
100.00
90.00
80.00
75.00
1107.23 j
87.75
74X5
65X0
58X0
52X0
48X5
1183.63
131.88
129.38
112.50
101.25
90 M
9438
fr?t all Ha tact* at yoar wall* Army Cmm?
or Pot. or U. S. Amy RooraHta* SHHoa.
RECRUITING OFFICE,
New CITY HALL Bldg.,
GREENVILLE, N. C.
Post Office Bldg., Farmville, N. C., Wednesdays, 9-10 A. M.
THIS AD SPONSORED BT
THE TURNAGE COMPANY, Inc.
_ GENERAL MERCHANTS
Corner Main and Wilson Sts. ? ? Farmville, N. C.
100
>r?of
SUou^uin
oL?wxjz
? IMITATION
BANANA
Jufru&a/i .
AustiteNicKols
eCoJRlnc.
Just received a shipment of
mm
Will fit any style or model car. Can
give you prompt installation.' WM
m
just received shipment
rd Sinks.
St m ' H Farnvilli N. G
    

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