North Carolina Newspapers

    'A
JOURNAL; ft - tf f
m
BEISNE, N, C. , JUNEl 5 1882.
-d at the Poet office at New Beraev'it. t?.
Amy ' netirezaentc
1-5-
he Senate passed on Tuesday
Army Appropriatioa; Bill, ' in
h. there was a provision ; for
rryj-etirement of all ;anny
era oa reaching the age of sixry
. The frientU of Sherman and
ridan fought hard to make them
:rtion. but under 'the active
iry leadership of GeneraTvo-tnlental
tLeyJ
werej beaten ana the
T intactiB'N?-V
- ? after the war Bill Arp
4 i -'.ZTze
t:
:te a Liter for the press in which
slated that he would get ;. recon-
tfter aic hile. .We thinlcwe
k the sentiment of the peo-
cf t 'i section in saying that
r I ' . :-. inee been reeon-
. r 11 tlie world and . the
el' i:;..."dr. J except .with- the
- - 1 : a name is indelibly' asso-j
Tritli the plunder,, and ;de4
'. : n cf tt. 3 last days of the
11 T7r. "Sherman's bummers'
ztrated every nook and corner
ir, Jones.
'Wayne and other
: 3 wLefe'the JdUBNliJiirca
r 1 1 vrliether tie General hinr
C3 cr was not responsible for
acts, he. has the credit : for
izeanness and the name of
mer" carries the people of that
i 1 r. ck to those j cruel days,
- "Ve of war; was re-,.
. ; t : 3 lowest forms of pillage
' and in designating
worse name can be in
. .....j. to say one is" asr mean
;;zian's 'bunimerst' .4-U ?
feel more kindly " towards
.11." an . for his firmness In
- T to be led by the Sherman
...2 C:niri CaxipaigiiW
3 n : nidation of Dockery by tie
: 1 Convention . bodes .a sharp
f. r tLe Democrats in the sum-
c nvass. He ( will : doubtless
, tL3 solid support of ;,tie
..Icaui ia the State," and there
; -z.li of the fact that there
ahead, of the Demo-
: it t Ie admitted thatthe
: ts have 'the advantage of
Ion, - r.nJ the probabilities
n. t! eir ?i of tbe house, pro-
I r.o mistakes are made. - If
' r:;a are ncramated and sound
r j-arjr.ed, victory may' bo ex-:
1 to reraain where if". hasso"
; relied in North Carolina.
: Tl::t is soundpohT-;We
to the Chairman, of .'the
; .:.': 3 Etate Executive Com-
- f a
can d policy,'J..is,,o(
1 tv
G overnor Jarvis-and
rv- Doard- in ; their
' f Lis" "'sectfondFTfhe
J : :e to eonvicts voted
I a ' ::ire' to construct
tLxculi the public lands in
-J Cnslow counties; .r
charge that the law w vio
czar;
e that the East -is being
;d against. I . X
car;
e that the Penitentiary
.r 1 Las slighted- and insulted
C-:araissioners of - Quaker
, e Lave made these ; assertions
;r?, and our columns were
o : I to-" reply, 'but none lias of
; ? n raade. jTenqw-eallothe
.':n of the State Executive
:Lt;3 to the case? aid suggest
C
' t it nay be worth their while to
X .y a L.:l3 attention to it If the
C: . .litee thinks, as we do, that
tL 3 contest in the coming campaign
r: ill be close, it will be well for
V L:m to investigate "..this matter.
TL ?v cannot afford to remain silent
- L:n a charge of injustice is 'made
r r 1 c o nstantly reiterated The
l':7 Eeme Jotjenai shouldjbe
; 1! r :od, cither: by complying: with
i : 5 cl :mands, or by showing to the
I le that it is. wrong.- -r ?y "
It 13 alleged that the East must
- ' 2 no demand for, anything' ex
c S the retention of the 'County
overnment plan. - The 'JpvJBNAl.
i ; "ases to be bound by such doc
trine. - .Let. the County. Govern
ments be settled according to the
will and best interests of the whole
people; and then let equal justice
be administered-thrbnghout the
f3 tate. -,- QM :
But. strange aa it mar Bound to the
T-cptiblican. ear; we may; whisper in it
tL: tie young men of the democratic
r rtr are not there for office. They are
i er8 for good government. They have
ttemal, they intend to continue to have
it. Dont forget thzU-StatesviOe Land
mark, . . .. ty ,.:'vt '
Would It not be"a good idea to.
turn oat the ;Pcnitentiarj"JBoard
and put in some "young men"
somebody that is in ."for good gov
The Democrats at Washington do not
seem to relish the appointments made
by the President of the members of the
Tiri;I Commission. Neat and Observer.
Bat how are' they goingtoT kelp
t hens elves T Theyare i itf tie saiie
fix that the people in this section of
t L a State are in regarjr fJ the ;ise
c f pe r. i t en t i ary eonv ictswev Jiaye
to trie it out iio grjambiingiThe
r t f amishes the convicts but the
, t r.al Center furniskthe Peni-
to-tlary Board of DirectorsT,n
U Thq J)0moeratic County Conven
tion of Craven on Tuesday reeom
menclel t iibe Convention of the
SeeonVlJddieial District to assem
ble in iWeldon r on ThnrsdayV the
15th instant, the name of Henry E
Bryan as its choice to wear the Ju
dicial ermine from this, district for
the; ensuing eight years.' " .
Mr Bryan" was born in New
Berne Von the 8th day of March,
X83Gj an Is now in f his 47th year,
in-the prime of lKth - IkkHIy and
vigor.1
His- father, the late
Honl . John H. Bryan," moved
his
family to: Raleigh in .1838,. where
the subject of this sketch lived un
til iiej had reached manhood's es
tate. His early education was had
from ; Raleigh's, celebrateil peda
gogue,r J. M. Lovejoy, and from
there lie 'enteifcd the University of
North Carolina in 1852 and gradu
ated with ' honorable distinction in
185G, delivering the Latin Saluta
tory' while only; twenty years of
age; lit Jnne 1857, he obtained !
license" to practice law,: and has fol-
lowed
I prpiession -.wiin cretin
and " ability ever since, growing
constantly in the esteem and confi
dence Of his 'clients and of his fel
low citizens throughout the coun
try. In 18C0 he male JTew Berne
his home, and, with the. exception
of the time filled by, the war, has
resided, here ever since.
"Mr. BrVan; was ; elected clerk of
the IT. S. Circuit Court in Raleigh
in lSCO, and ;was; Hancockpietor
m 1880; and with those exceptions
has never held office. Quiet and
unassuming, with a mind well stored
witli legal oreandi a disposition
equable and ; temperate, he would
fill with dignity and honor the po
sition desired for him by his friends.
If the Convention at Weldon shall
see fit to- recommend - him as their
choice it will do credit to their wis
dom, aid add strength to tbe ticket
which bears the name of a man, who
in every campaign in Craven ; conn'
ty since 1868, has borne the brunt
of the fight with no reward mor
hope of reward save consciousness
of having done his.dnty to the Dem
ocratic party . r Vs
C. C. Clark. -
It was expected for. the r County
Convention of Craven, which as
sembled in Xew Berne on yester
day 5; toffor
large - th name? of Hon., Charles
C. Chirk: :Bnt ; when Dr; Slo-
TerK rone , : oi . --iue . tusiegai.es
rose and made tie motion, .3Ir. J.
L. H' Missillierrose and stated
that Mr. Chirk desired j him l to re
turn thanks for the repeated ex
pression of confidence and esteem
heretofore shown hinv by theii Cra
ven DemocracyV bnt" that ' it . ', was
contrary to his wished to liave his
name broughi ibrward at thisitime,
for this' posHion;iiSA
' This was a surprise to -' the , Con
vention and Mr. Clark's name was
relactanirttidaivn:TVe
pose the explanation is, not thatyhe
would rerose a nomination from the
State Convention, but that he was
unwilling to have the : Democratic
party embarrassed ; byi" his ; recom
mendation. " If that was . his mo
tire we think he has made a -mistake.
We; believe " the expressed
wish1 of Craven ought to have, s an.d
would have considerable weight in
our State Convention; and we are
sorry to see ? this vantage ground
lost through the modesty of the one
whom public opinipn had centered
on as the representative' man for
the position. ot In expectation
that - he would t receive this
recommendation we had collected
some " of- the c events of' his life for
the benefit of the.-public, and give
below i a -brief epitome of these
eventsy: -v, t;
V,; Charles Cl Clark was born in
2few ; Berne in the year 1829;
matriculated . at Wake jj'orest m
1845. where he remained two and
a half years, i He joined Princeton
College in 1847, and was graduated
at, that "institution in 1849. He
returned to his - native town, and
commenced the study 'of law in the
officeof W;:H. & 'John Washing
ton, obtaining his' county court
license in 1850., His health being
very seriously impaired he aban
doned his profession temporarily
and took charge of the Atlantic, a
newspaper which he started in
NewJ3erne and edited most suc
cessfully until the year 1854. He
again returned to the study of his
profession, and in 1855 obtained his
Superior Court license and com
menced the regular practice of law.
In 1800 he was the successful candi
date for tlie Legislature, having
the Hon. D. K. McRae for
netitor. Durinc the war
a com- i
he was I
appointed Commissary of the
Thirty-third Regiment, with the
rank of Captain, which position he
resigned to accept the position
of Solicitor of this Judicial
District, to which he was
eleeted-by the Legislature in 1662.
In 18G5 he was elected to represent
his county in the Convention of the
State. In 1865, while in the Con
yenton he was elected to Congress
toxepresent this District.
v- In 1870 - he was elected Grand
Master of Masons in North Carolina,
and was reelected the succeeding
rjear, :
"The Phi Society Es&iy'Medar" was
presented to D. W. Herring, of Pender
countyy by tJoT. Jarvis, in an address
laden with patriotic sentiments, charac
teristic Of onr noble Governor. His ex
cellency's remarks were loudly ap
plauded. News n2 Observer account
of Wake Forest Commencement.
YcRf we notice that Governor
Jarvis attends all the Commence
ments and seems to be a great
friend to the cause of education,
but when it comes to sending con
victs to cut a road in Jones county
which will' help to develop 80,000
acres of land belonging to the State
Board of Education of North Caro
lina, he fails us. It is easier to
talk education than to do educa
tion; easier to utter patriotic senti
ments than to do justice to a" people
hwho have no voice in the Legisla
ture and the applause oi crowded
halls is worth more to some people-
than the simple satisfaction ot hav
in g done one's duty.
It all comes from the forbearance of
Deacon Richard Smith with his wicked
partners. The outside world, prone to
lniscontrue what it does not entirely un
derstand, thinks that he cannot be a per
fect deacon because he pertinaciously
exercises toward them the virtues of
patience and of forgiveness. "We think
that he is wrong in carrying these vir
tues so very far; but we assure our cor
respondent that this beautiful, though
mistaken, forbearance ought not to be
interpreted as affording any gi-ound for
doubt - - respecting . . Deacon Richard
Smith. iV, lSun.
- That is just what is the matter
with Governor Jarvis. He is dis
posed to deal fairly on the Quaker
Bridge road matter, . but he .has
some wicked partners, in the Pen
itentiary Board of Directors, who
thwart him in his good desires, but
his . "forbearance ought not to
be; interpreted as affording any
ground for doubt."
..Thai CJol. Dockerj will be elected to
stay at home next November, does not
admit of a doubt. News mid Observer.
f .Then the loss to the Democratic
party of one or two hundred votes
in this section,- on account of the
Quaker Bridge road matter, , will
make no difference 1 The readers
of the JoxjRNAii in Jones .and Ons
low have a right, to think that this
opinion is held at headquarters, for
they believe their rights are denied
them, wilfully and of malice aforethought.-
v -. i fc ; . , -i-.
Gov. Jarvis made a speech congratu
lating the people of Chapel Hill on the
completion of this railway connection.
lie said that the road must not stop
here, but must penetrateothe counties
beyond, and make a feeder, for the N. C.
R. R. and be a boon to the section
through which it may pass. His speech,
as usual, Was full of good sound sense..
Azheville Citizen. , . . ,
Suppose-the Quaker Bridge Com -
missioners agree : to call their hew
road a feeder to the N. C. R. R., or
a feeder to the W. N. C. R. R.,
mavbe there will bo some chance to
w riwvT.,!- Twwlawards and prizes: Gold pen to
, .. :
Z'l 1111 OI ; glHHl rwmiHl
behalf. V . . o
sense'' in its
- . From the Ashcvilie t'ilizeii. ...
Notes from Clay.
. Arriving at the "hospitable man
sion of-"A 1 iek' Monday, the whole
party was liounti fully feasted with
a dinner of trout and other luxuries
common I in the mountains, but
rarely found elsewhere. After din
ner, under command of Col.- David
son, a portion of - the company re
sumed'the ' journey while others
rested till Monday. Early on Mon:
day morriing-our party now re-,
ducel to, eight members started
for Hayes ville. First up the beau
tiful, winding, romantic banks of.
the Nantahala, or as more euphoni
ously spoken by the Cherokees, a
long drawn Nantay-y-a-ee-lee. Then
oyer the Tnsquittee mountains to
the creek oi the same name. Going
up the Tnsquittee mountain several
of the party alighted and walked
up. Arriving at the top, and after
enjoying the magnificent view from
the road gap, the party again em
barked, getting into the buggies
and 'carriage just as covenience or
fancy for the moment dictated. It
happened that Ms Honor and Tom
Johnston got into the same buggy
and on the descent we met a car
riage coming up right in one of
those rugged, rough and crooked
places where the road is cut out
of the mountain side, a steep
bank above and rock wall below.
Capt.- Johnston, in attempting
to make room for the passing car
riage, managed to let the horse step
off the rocky breastworks. The
horse turned a complete summer
sault and stopped on his back with
his head up the mountain. The
buggy went over the horse and
stopped upside down still below
him. Capt. Tom, Johnston like,
always on the upper side, jumped
out unharmed in the rtfad, while the
Judge took a flying leap "through
the air" down the mountain, first
alighting in the tops of some sap
lings, which bending beneath his
weigit, landed him on his feet some
twenty-five or thirty feet from the
point where he sprang from the
buggy. But legs of steel could not
have supported his weight from
such descent and he still went down
till he was flat on the ground. But
though down the "judiciary" was
not yet "exhausted." By the time
the judge had "lit" I was tearing
down the mountain towards him.
"Is the judge killed?" came in con
cert from every moutli. But sim
ultaneously with the wailing inquiry
I heard the indire exclaim with
perfect coolness but with a slightly
exulting ring in his voice, "I'm all
right, take care of the horse !' As
sisting him to rise I went and un
harnessed the horse which immedi
ately got up, and strange to tell,
there was "nobody hurt." But we
are free to venture the assertion
that Judge Gilliam has made the
longest, highest and deepest leap
ever achieved by any member of
the North Carolina bar. On exam
ination w.e found there was but one
small damage done to the buggy
and harness and by the help of a
few withs and some hickory bark
we patched up and drove on to
Hayesville with splendid appetites
for the good dinner await ing us.
LMter From Pilot Salter,
June 12, 1882. f
Editors XewBerne Journal: j
riease give me space in your
columns to correct a statement
made in a letter of Gen. It. Ransom
in the issue of your paper on Sun
day last. He charges me with hav
ing stranded the GuhWringa and
states that the 17r was run upon
a shoal more than two hundred
yards West of the proper channel.
I was Pilot of the Viva and ground
ed her upon a lump on which was
16J feet of water, and she struck,
not more than her width from the
main channel. I was on board of
the Guldbringa,jxi8t as several other
pilots, were with me on the Viva;
but I was not her pilot, and take
no share of the blame of her strand
ing, any more than I throw the
responsibility of grounding the
Tlm'Tipon those who were with!
me.
iiic insinuation oi uriljery or
corruption is false and not worMiy
of notice, for the whole people of
Beaufort, as well as myself, are the
losers by any such accident. .
Very respectfully, T ,
John H. Salter.
Conference,
Mb. Editor: New Berne Dis
trict Conference is to convene in
Beaufort June 22. Special rates
have been made with Col. J. W.
Andrews .to pass preachers, dele
gates and visitors to the Confer
ence at the following rates:
Goldsboro to Morehead City and
return: $2.50
Li Grange . 2.00
Kinston 1.75
New Berne 1.25
Newport 1 " ..75
These low rates only apply to
regular train on Tuesday evening
June 21 and the tickets will be
good to return on anj' regular train
within 10 days.
The preachers and delegates will
be met at Morehead on Tuesday
night.
N. M. Jurney.
Trinity
EXTRACTS FROM THE REPORT OF
REV. N. M. JTJRNEY IN NEW
YORK HERALD OF JUNE 9TH.
"This has been a great day for
for Trinity College. People have
gathered from all parts of the State,
leaving the busy works of life and
cares to congratulate the boys.
The crowd is estimated at 6,000j
half the number only eould be ac
commodated with seats. No insti:
tntioh. and commencement occa
sion ever had. such a crowd and
everything was- most successfully
done: Dr. Talmage said he never
heard better speaking at any Col
lege and the moral tone and all
that he had seen and beaded at
Trinity College was first class. The
contest for the various prizes was
great and exciting to intense in
terest. . The following bovs receised
E. B. Hodgres ot Tarboro. Read-
eis medal to G. S. Green of Yancy
county. Hesperian debaters med
al to W.. T. Pate. Columbian de
bators medal to S. W. Finch of Da
vidson county. Bodie medal for
the best Junior speaker to Albert
Anderson of Wake county. .Schol
arship medal to W. P. Bymun of
Stokes county. The Wiley Gray
medal to B; P. Lane of Wilson Co.
: Col. J. W. Alspongle President
of the Board of Trustees present
ed each graduate with a Diploma
Dr. Craven on tie part of the Col
lege presented each with a Bible.
After a little rest and music, Dr.
B. Craven arose and said: "I now
have the pleasure of presenting to
this vast audience Dr. Talmage a
man so well known to two conti
nents that it is impossible to find
those to whom lie can be intro
duced." Dr. Tabnage arose amid continued
and long applause, and made an
impressive address. "TTor? of
Coqmel" was the subject of his
speech to the young men.
He advised them all to avoid
unpayable debts, as they would
prove a life of happiness rather
than one of misery."
For tlie Jot'RVAr..
The Thoniasvillc College.
In attending commencements a
person for the time being forgets
the cares and perplexities of our
tread-mill existence. At Thomas
ville all was good cheer. Dr. Wet
more and President Greene were
the engaged speakers.
The, young ladies canie in the
Chapel at the sound of the bell by
twos orderly, neat, and prompt.
The essay and valedictory by Miss
Rena Beckwith "Over the Alps"
was quite creditable.
The song "I would not live al
ways" by Miss Minnie Reinhart
was rendered so overpoweringly,
that many sobbed. The song
"Come Avhere tlie violets bloom,"
by a tiio, was considered among
the best. How the passions are
aroused or calmed by these fair,
tender little young beings.
Looking rightward, tlie pilot
mountain i as a mass of blue and
green clouds.
At night every inch of ground
floor of the large brick chapel (the
building is of brick, large and im
posing) is quickly taken and many
outside. The Principal offers any
class for a public or private exami
nation. Looking over this expectant j
throng we see many queenly worn- j
en to admire, many stately men to ;
boast of.
Lenoir county lias two represen
tatives here as students. Five dis
tinctions are awarded to Kinston,
and Miss Berta Hardee receives
four of them. A bevy of young la
dies decide that Mr. Helvin Rein
hart of Silver Mines, Dr. of
Thomasville and Mr. James Hill of
Kinston are the handsomest young
men present. From the attentions
received bv the voung ladies (up to j
12 o'clock) a good many awarded j
the palm of beauty to Miss Minnie j
Rbinhart of Thomasville, Miss An-!
na Hardee of Jvinston and Miss
Alice Wilson of Virginia. The
Music department, in charge of
Miss Brewster and Mrs. Schooler
was surpassingly good in every
song and overture.
Frof. Thompson, graduate of
Louisville a!nd Rochester Colleges,
is one of the ablest teachers in the
State. The Misses Beckwith and
Draughan are popular with all stu
dents and visitors.
All acknowledge that Prof. Rein
hart and lady are two of the most
accomplished. teachers, in manners
and mind, in the entire South.
The terms are moderate, table
fare good, rooms spacious, and
grounds large and well shaded.
This school deserves a large coun
tenance and support. Visitor.
expressing' the Message.
A writer in the Boston Traveller tells
how the President's message was once,
before the days of railroads, 'expressed'
from Providence to Boston, a distance
of forty-two miles, in one hour and forty
minutes.
It was done in this way. l'ost-boys
were stationed along every mile. The
message was tied around a whip-stick;
the fleetast horses were elected, and the
hest riders. As the post-boy saw the
messenger coming he started, got his
own horse well going, and as the mes
senger overtook him he rode alongside,
grasped the whip and urged his own
horse to his highest speed, at the end
of a mile delivering to the next. And so
! the process was repeated the entire for
ty-two miles.
., The Astonished Farmer
-Many humorous stories are told ot
persons wishing to send bundles by tele
graph; but they are more than matched
by a story of a Canada farmer, who sent
an ox to market by railway:
When the Grand Trunk Railway of
Canada was completed, in 1860, man
of the farmers had never" seen or even
heard of a railway; but it soon became
known that passengers could travel by
it, and even, cattle.
A backwoodsman, was inebted to a
country merchant, was pushed by the
latter for payment of the amounfevdue
and the only means of liquidating the
debt was by taking a fat ox to the Que
bec market. For this purpose the tied
his ox to the back of his cart, and
drove to the railway station, and dis
tance of nine miles.
On surveying the train, and seeing
an iron railing aronnd the platform of
the hind car, he concluded that that
was the place to tie his ox, which he
accordingly did taking a place in a second-
class car himself forward.
Presently the train began to move
slowly. The speed increased; quicker
and quicker it went. The poor man be
came very anxious, the speed still in
creasing, until large drops of sweat be
came visible on li s brow. By this time
the conductor had reached his car to
collect the tickets. Nearly out of
breath, tlie man ran to him, exclaim
ing.
'Mr. Conductor, my ox will never be
able to keep up at this pace; it is not
possible.'
'Your ox!. Keep up to this pace!
What do you mean?. I don't under
stand you. Have you oxen on board?'
'Not on board, of course. T tied
him to the raillinjr of the hind car.'
'You tied your ox to the railling of
the hind, car? Who told you to do so?7
'Xo one, but that is the way we al
ways do in the country.'
Of course the couductor could not
stop his train before reaching the next
station, wheu needless to say, on look
ing for the ox, they- found attached to
the rope a pair of horns, with a small
portion of the neck.
M. Bergh could scarcely call this
cruelty to animals, as it was not hi tend
ed. The humane conductor made a collec
tion among the passengers on the spot,
realizing a larger amount than the ox
would h:vc brought at market, which he
presented to the crestfallen farmer, who
immediately returned home, vowing he
would nevei have oxen taken to market
by railway again. He has kept his
word, and to this day he leads his ox to
market behind his own cart.
NOTICE OF
Copartnership
MR. E. H. WINDLEY
is this dav admitted as an
EQUAL PARTNER
in onr 2sew Berne business, and from
this time the business will be under'his
sole
CONTROL AND SUPERVISION.
All debts contracted with the original
firm will be collected by
MR. T. L. DBUMMOND,
who will pay all the debts contracted
prior to this date.
Thanking the public for their very lib
eral patronage, we would respectfully
say we have largely increased all our
facilities and will hereafter ofl'er our
celebrated
BAVARIAN BEER
to the trade at $2.50 per crate.
llpspeetfully.
B. P. SALE & CO.,
New Berne, Hf. C-
June 14, 1882. d 2w w It.
HORSES, MULES, PONIES,
Buggies, Wagons, Phaetons,
HARNESS, WHIPS, SADDLES,
Louis Ccok'3 celebrated Work,
GOOD YOUNG STOCK
always on hand, and fur fale
j,0
FOE CAHH.
A. At M. HAHN,
Middle Street,
Opposite Episcopal Church and Odd
Fellows Hall. w-Cm
LA GRANGE " ACADEMY.
(Established in 1870.)
La Grange, TV. iO.
i Male and Female.
J. Y. JOYXEIt. Ph. T,
J D. MURPHY, Ph:B.,
Principals.
Miss Louise M. Daniels, Music Teacher.
The Fall Term of this institution will
begin Monday, August 7 th, 1882. Pu
pils can obtain a practical business edu
cation or thorough prepamtion for Col
lege. The Academy is a spacious building
and well supplied with all appliances
newssary to successful teaching.
Tne Principals hope, by perseverance
and faithfulness, to merit a liberal share
ofvpublic patronage.
Such assistants will be employed as
the necessities of the school may require.
A competent and experienced teacher
has charge ot the music department.
EXPENSES :
Tuition 4 8 to $20
Music, ffncludtnj; uk f inMrumfni) tlft to 20
Board, (including light and fut-l) 4 if to 410
We refer to the Faculty of the Uni
versity of Xorth Carolina and to our
former patrons. je 15-tf.
S. H. SCOTT,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL CEALES IN
Dry Goods, Hats and Cap, Boot and Shoes. Al
amance Spun cotton, chotcp Family Oroccripc.
Prices as low as the lowest. Alu Pure Wiiir
and the best of Liquors. Berjrner nd Engt-t's
Lager Beer always fresb and pure.
Middle street, opposite People's Market,
NEW BERNE N. C, ,
NOW OPEN AT
Weinstein Building,
A FULL STOCK OF SPRING AND
SUMMER GOODS CONSISTING OF
Ladies' F&iicy Goods,
Mens and BoyT Clothing-,
Boots and Shoes,
Hats of the Latest Styles,
Notions, Trunks and Satchels,
Carpets, Uugs and Matting's
Ladies Ulsters and Shawls.
A COMPLETE STOCK OF
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS.
WHICH WILL BE S0LH CHEAP AT
WVL SULTAN & CO. '8.
' April l-dw-ly.
For
COLDS,
HEADACHE,
TORPID LIVER
and CHILLS,
use
BERRY'S
Cliill HPills.
Measures taken for nothing from
ROGERS, PEET & CO., K Y.
a t
Berry's Drug Store.
Parties baying for Cash, ca.n buj
DRUGS, GARDEN SEED,
Paper and Envelopes, Paints, Brush
es, Glass, Toys, Wall Paper, and
many other things at bottom prices at
Berry's Drug Store. Apr. 9 ly w.
C. B. HART & CO.
ONE PBICE CASH STORE.
Nortl-ist corner Middie anl Sonth Front streets,
,osite K. H. Winrtley and K. B. Jones.
dealers is
Stoves, House Famishing Goods,
CROCKERY and GLASSWARE,
LAMPS in great variety.
BURNERS, WICKS, CHIMNEYS,
KEROSENE OIL,
Pratt's Astral Non-Explosive Oil,
Machine and Train Oils.
We are now prepared to manufacture
Tin and Sheet-Iron Ware.
Special attention given to repairine. Gooa
sold low and warrnted to be as represented.
April 14 ly d i w
S. H. ABBOTT,
has opened at his New Store
A LARGE STOCK OF
Dry Goods, Family Groceries,
also Hollow, Wooden, Crockery
Tin and Glass Ware. Farming
Utensils, such as Plows, Shovels
Hoes, Hames, Colars &c.
wh eh will he replenished weekly form
the Northern Markets.
SPECIALITIES.
Ladles and Gents Hand-made
SHOES, "Creme Oat Meal" Toi
let SOAP, lOots a l..x of .3 calces
"ii each box.
A Full assortment of remnants
of LACES at lOcts s bunch of
from 2 to lO yds in eacli bunch.
S. H. Abbott's warranted WHITE
ROSE Family Flour.
1550,000 Hand made BRICK
By a strict personal attention to 1ms
inesg I hope to merit the patronage of a
generous public in the future. Thask
ing ni7 friends for their pasl liberal
favors I am respeetfulty
Feb 10, 6m S. II. ABBOTT.
E. M, HODGES.
Kinston, N. C,
Maunfartur "'l r'Tit-irs H kinds nl
BUGGIES, CARRIAGES,
Carts, Wagons and Plows,
(.liwifwr than yon can buy them North, also
Cheap Coffins
Made to orrtr on
Nunn'b Hotel.
short r.ot-ice.
Shop opposite
3m.
EHODES HOTEL
WILLIAJISTOK, 5. C.
First class fare, polite servants and
good accommodations.
WM. LORCH,
DEALER IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
CAST HOUSE ACCOlQfOSAIlOKS. '
Broad It. Now Borne, 9. C.
Mur. so, 1 y
DAIL BROS.,
WH0LE8AE ' Q RO VERS
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
NKW nr R
O. MARKS,
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Dry Goods, Notions. Shoes,
Trimmings and Iacch of all
Kinds, Table Linen, the Best
Napkins, all Linen, from 0 to
12 1-2 ets apiece,
Hamburg Edgings in endless
variety and sold at lowest prices.
MOTTOES,
AND
MOTTO FRAMEH,
. RUSTIC FRAMES
of all sizes.
I make a specialty of supplying
the Jobbing Trade. Country er
chants are invited to call and examine
my extensive Stock before baying.
Also the Celebrated
STANDARD SEWING
MACHIN;EVB,;h;
of the following Bake!
The Light Banning; DOMESTIC,
HARTFORD AND HOUSEHOLD, . tlie
three best Machines on the Market.
Do not forest th pluce, O. HIARK8, ,
No. SO, Pollock .,
New Berne, N. C.
DISTILLERS AGENT
FOR
Pureftye and Co
HISKEY
-a.T txrTrr t:-bi a t -
-'rs ..... .
WINES AffD CIOABS
In Great Variety.
Ginger Ale, Pale Ale, Beer
and Porter.
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
C I 1) K It
In Bbls. 1-2 Bbls. and Kegs.
JPixre French Urandy
LARGEST DEALER IN THE STATE.
COMMISSION MERCHANT
For the Sale of all Kinds of
PROD U C E.
Guarantee Highest Market prices,
E. H. WENDLEY,
Corner South Front & Middle St
NEW BERNE, N. C.
Apr; 11, 6mdiw
THOS. GATES & CO.
OFFER A LARGE STOCK OF
KINDS OF
ALL
Provisions and
Dry Goods
AT VERY LOW FIGURES.
Commission Merchants for the SaJeoi
Cotton and Grain.
SOUTH FRONT ST,, OPPOSITE
GASTON HOUSE.
Mr. 30-w-ly.
JOHN DUNN,
MANUFACTURER OF
And Wholesale and Retail Dealer In
Steam refined Confectionery.
CANDIES,
FRKSH & CANNED FRUITS,
Crackers and Cakes,
CIG ARS,
And all Kinds of Children's TOYS
WAGONS &c. fcc.
POLLOCK
St.,
Apr 13, ly w
New Berne, N. C
E. H. Windley,
rrio or.
MARKET WHARF, KXW BERNE. X. V
AtaskMptM hand fall 1 ol' "' ..'
ROPES AND TWINES, ;" - -SPIKES.
NAI LS, CANVAKS,
- "ATO ALL KINDS ".'.;
PAINTS, OILS and BRUSHES. '
Aprfl 1-w-m. " 4 '
"SMALL PROFITS A1TD QncK RA VYM.
' eWIIOLKSALE dt llETAl'lVv 2S
GI?Of!F.rcfi'. : -
Corner Broad And Qxeen 8trU, '
NEW BERNE,4 C.
imwi skuits jjni i .ibbicks:-:
" Mar;30, 1 y w '
ROBERTS & BROS
Kmp oa fcjuid fall Una of : , .'
i i r- - v -.. . :.
Boots, Blioea) JDx-y
uoTioura ' " t
AND A CHOI (TP. isiini7Tjrm a' : 1 '
FAMILY OR O C EUIED. '
CU cm u befor making yoor jvarcham, at v
oath Front St. near Gaaioa Howt, Mw.M.ly. ',
w A-i -v v 4 rM ks,j 1 4 V V i-i i ; r
OXFOKI3N, C.
'Mil f
- Tlc next Beesion of thU ' arhool wOl '
beera the second Monday In Janu ary 1 '
s x or circular giving terms and other -ftartieHlank
jtpplr lo the principal. . .
: - '"KJ. XI. X J. tjt HUil Uli.;' "-T
' "Jan, 1, 1t.'"'- yo-M- : -.z;l!i '
e.. w - -i
.niiLnire
mu
, ,. .. it
F. BCESSER
haa been in the LumneM for the Uut . '
.soYEAitK;;;.'.;:;','
P U L L-: STOCK;!
t ALWAYS ON 'lIANI -V,
Oivo 3x1
: . . .'".1' " Corncc of Broad
and Middle Street. . - ; . . "
' - : NEW BEBNE, N. C. '
Mar.90.smw : ;
'LiHslIEADOYo C: Cl,
r "'.'V SALUt8 Ol ' "" . ' v
., ' ' . -
DlllfoS, SEEDS and UUAN03.
Igricnltural ChcsiaJi - -:
X" Tractcr'i Supplies Fpecisltj.
. aprzo-sra .. ..
It i stands at tho head '
THE LIGHT ETTNNINCh r'
i. . . . ...'
, - '..II -
f , A; '
t
domestic;-,
Tbat Uth acknowledged U4tr im
Trad U a fact that cuioot he dliutd. . ' , ., .
MANY IMITATE T! ' ; t f
NOM3 EQUAL IT! : -
TbtUifttt AmtA TIm lAgfcM Wimm ,
ala-. The moat BaamUrml .Waa.wtu..
AMD IS WARHAITED -To
be. made of the Wat saatorbO. Ta do rnrny . '.
and all Kind mt Wark. To CeMsptoCa . .
la Ever Rkiaect... ..'.: ,".
For economy an J perfectioa of lit, Ibe op A T
hu- Dontitle Paper raahia. " .' ' 1
Oatalofue free. ForeaWby '
O. HARKS, l" '- "'' .
Feb. 2nd 1. I W Bevat If . ' k
Addreas, . . - a,'.
Dmetl S. JX. Ca., '
',- KlCltMO, YvJ
-AceU Wanted. "' l . -aA.
Perdinand Ulrich, :
' DEALER IX- ' ' ' '
GROOEKLES &DRY G(fOD3j
IlOt)T8, SHOES, HATS, ' 1
... .' - . .
Itopes. Twines, Paints Oils Catfv '
vass.audOskum..;;', HilfJ
I t-. n wl a mm n ...... ' M I nL. v jui ur J. .
any quantity and -.-i,-4i,-. --.... ..
LORILLAKli KNUFP !t ; J
.. .. .. ;- V..
Ortleis tukrufof
NETS And 8FINE8. V
Foot of MlJ.Uo street, ' ' ' . '',. T
NEW BERNEi N. C. ? .
M.ir. 30. 1 T
IS THE SUPERIOR OOtTtT. I . - , f . r
To Council MTC-r. . . .. , '
Von will take notice that a epedal yroeeedta "
ha bMO b-run la tne name oi jona u. iH7,
dm'r. e. Edward Memar t al, to which roa Sr .
party defendant, lor the pnrpoae of anftlns th '
land lylnc in Joaea eonnty knowa ae the Lewla ,
Mercer humeetend. for aaaata to pay debt f the , .
niiuoviu, i". iTif.ii-. "r- -.- .
Tbomaa J. WbUaker, Eo Clerk of aaid Sfci arinr
Oonrt. at the Coort Uooae la Trenton on tu laih
day of Jnaa, IftSand aaawror awnor M yo
mar be adrled. to theoomplalat SIM. , '
d A w hi THOMAS J.WHITAKtR. t C f "
    

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