North Carolina Newspapers

    ''
Published Under Auspices fk
A jL-v * i
National War Work Council
I Y.M.C. A. of (Ac United Statu
Vol. 1
CORPL. HmiU WHITES
5 IIIIIKW STOHI
[ Private Koehler Gets Second
? Loving Cup and Private
t. . Cohn's Story Was Third.
.'Viv-?' '
"Tintypes In Heaven" written by
'^Corporal Judson Hanna, Supply company,
Thirtieth Infantry, wins first
, prize In the short story contest which
i v..." Kuun onndnptvd bv Trench and
I Camp during the month of January.
""Private Charles Koehler, Battery E,
] -Thirtieth field artillery, wins second
'prize with his story "Avenged," and
Private Manuel Cohn, Battery B, Thlr^
teenth field artillery, wins third prize
with his story "The Bohurk." Each
of the -winners received one of the
- threo beautifully engraved silver cups
'presented to Trench and Camp by
-Harry Newcome, former physical d:f
yector. at building 102.
v^CINTYPES IN HEAVEN.
(By* Corp. Judson Hanna, Supply comy
pany, Thirtieth infantry, Camp
> Craig- was sitting on a box of am\
munition, looking at tin-typo,
r when the shell struck ' us?the first
1-shell the Germans had sent us that
^morning. I never saw a cleaner hit.
.It came dropping down from the
; clouds square in one end of the trench,
:messing it up .something fierce, bc
sides killing three of our men out:
tight, and burying half a dozen others
;in their dugouts. And Craig. A
fragment of shell had scraped his
forehead, doing things to it wc didn't
like to look at. We found that ho
was still breathing, and made him as
*? ? ? > '-" wit till the
% P stretcher-bearers should come.
I'" "Ho oughtn't to have sat on that
1 ammunition box. It's unlucky." bads
oMyi, spreading a blanket over Craig-'
"Unlucky, you crab," says Vau.i.
f "What do you mean?"
f. "Like attracts like." says bads.
L "There's an alflnity between ammutjaiUon.
A box of cartridges Just nat'
turally draws shells, like llghtning?
rods draw lightning. Haven't you
.aver noticed how a sneli picks out an
ammunition wagon, or a pile of other
'shells sucked up by a big gun.
CjSade was the lad with the imagina"ilon.
We all said so.
^7- "Wot you looking for now, you
#)Mithen?" he says to \'aux.
S tyThat blessed tin-type, says \ aux,
'scraping around In the mud where
'Cralg "had. been sitting. "He'll want
pQiat picture." he says,
ft*- "Maybe," says bads, "and again
--?piaybe not."
""Maybe not, .you blithering calamHy-howler!"
Vaux says crossly.
'ain't going west this trjp. Wot, him
- . 7.,-likA what hes
and a baby, too? It's only the
.rotters gets killed."
, "Maybe that explain^ why you aln t
"dead," Eads says sarcastic.
says Vau*.
' "Well, how about Sergeant Jackson
' Was he a rotter? Tell me that.
; "No." says Vaux. "Jack was an
exception. Exceptions only amplify
ffgp rule. I wonder you lasted so long.
isaus.
"Me being an exception? Thanks,
Vaux. I wasn't looking for no bouquets
from you."
Eads got down In the mire and began
scraping around in the mud for
."the tin-type. "Not that the boy will
t>0 wanting it," he says. "But, well,
-il hope the frltzles haven't mussed it.
^Cralg certainly thought a lot of that
^cter."
'^ 'Pretty soon ten or a dozen men
>eere hunting for that tin-type, paw*
Jng through the muck and splinters of
:#ood and other things I won't mention.
Then a lieutenant comes up and
"^watches us a minute and says, "My
.Gawd, what are you chaps doing?"
"Looking for Craig's tin-type, sir,"
nays Eads.
' "Oh!" says the lieutenant; and
Tpretty soon he's poking around In
. tjtw-lness with his billie-stick as keen
.as the rest of us.
\ye all liked Craig. We liked hit
|?j * <C??tlnuea on .***? Two,) '
m
?
Printed Weekly for the Y
Ibt (Wjarltx
Edition for CAMP G1
FEBRUAR
OVER 243,000 MEN VISIT .
CAMP YS DURING MONTH
Nearly 2,500 Educational Classes
Attended by Total of 34,000
Soldiers at Camp Greene in
January.
Read the summary of statistics for
Y. M. C. A. buildings at Camp Greene
| and you will know how popular arc
the huts, how diversified are the activities,
and how many soldiers use
thetr spare time. All figures are for
the'month of January.
Estimated attendance at buildings
243,56a
Lectures?
Number .
Attendance 15,957
Classes? f
Number 2.457
I Attendance 34.790
I Number books circulated. 3,743
Clubs?
Number 10
Attendance 590
Physical Activities.
Sports?
Participants 1,174
Spectators 9.206
Religious Activities.
Meetings?
Number 96
j . Attendance A0.500
Number
Attendance 3,349
Scriptures distributed.... 558
1'crsonal Christian Interviews
Christian decisions 862
War roll signers 419
Social Activities.
Entertainments?
Number
Attendance 31.600
' Motion Pictures?
Number *jj
Attendance 66.250
Miscellaneous.
Letters, written 203.112
Hospital calls 718
Money orders^old . .$31,521.29
(hundreds thrilled by\N
Mil ITARY BAND MUSIC
| The twenty-five members of th<
Sixth Massac^uttes regimental band
who toted their instruments with then:
In their cross-country tramp to th<
j base hospital Y. M. C. A. Thursdaj
I night, wree rewarded by finding th<
| roorn packed by three hundred raedi|
cal soldiers and thirty-five nurses whf
j had also braved the deep mud in or
der to hear the music,
j The regiment band scored a big hit
I The.applaufte after each number shool
j the building. Mud and soiled suit:
and all weariness of limb were forgotten
when the band struck up th<
lively airs. Sergeant Blsnet displayed
his ability as a leader and the school
ing of his men when he directed then
through two descriptive numbers o:
beauty. "Babe" Rogers, who sang t<
beat the band, was called back aftei
each of his vocal numbers.
The base hospital men are willinf
to execute all kinds of promises re
garding proper conveyance if the regi
mental band will return for anothei
evening.
OP MTO INFANTRY.
Well the machine gun boys hav?
left us and we .were sorry to se?
them go. Especially B. C. Adami
who came back to us from the N. A.
Camp Upton for he was a good scout
Corp. L. J. Young Is attending th?
engineering school and claims tha
digging trenches is not fatigue. W<
want to know what it is then.
Poet D. P. Higgins has left us ir
sadness but we hope he will wrlti
some good poems to cheer us up.
The boys are glad to see Captaii
Terrel out again after being sick foi
a week.
What we want to know is what ii
the matter with the honorable edl
tor of The Trench and Camp as w<
did not get them till late in thi
week.
The only wish this company has i:
, that the weather will soon change si
that we can stretch our legs on i
i" ten mile hike and try out the talcn
of song leading of Privates J. J
Smith and F. E. S" ilwsll.
>}
. M. C. A. by Courtesy of
ite ?bscrt?i
REENE Charlotte, N. C.
If 18, 1918
iCHHS PUN OF WORK
' TO NUKE CIIPEH DETKR
|
(Board of Departmental Editors
Henceforth to Revitalize
Trench and Camp.
The old order changes yielding
place to new. for (lod reveals Himself
in many ways lest one good custom
should corrupt the world. Bid farewell
to the old Trench and Camp. Beginning
with next week's issue Trench
and Camp will appear revitalized and
transformed.
For some time past, the editor of
Trench and Camp has ?.een considering
ways and means for making the
paper more readable, more instructive
and more representative of the. sol1
diers it aims to serve. The plan out[
lined below appears the most effective
| and practicable.
j In the future the paper will have a
1 board of editors composed of the camp
editor. Harold M. Thurston, and four
departmental editors. Charles M. Oliver,
educational and literary; Dr. Har'
ry H. McKecn, religious; Charlet R.
* Edwards, news, and an athletic director,
athletics. It Is hoped that more
news and better news can be printed
1 in this way.
One word more, neither this plan
nor any other plan will bring results
unless every reader does his hit by
writing and bringing in to the Y. M.
C. A. every-item of personal and genI
>roi interest, and by giving Trench
and Camp every atom of your literary
store. Every soldier should lie
': proud of his paper. For your reprei
sentative you want the best paper we
j ran publish. Most of the copies go
'j back to the folks at home. In years
, | to come It vJi'll be a fine, thing to look
; l over old Trench and-Camp copies and
[see what you did at Camp Greene.
' I Give us your best efforts and let the
character of your contributions repreJ
sent your character.
t\
jCAMP GREENE SECOND
IN INSURANCE RECORD
BY II. i:. C. BRYANT.
! Washington. Feb. 17.?On the basis
of official reports so far received at the
> bureau of war risk insurance, 90 per
" cent of the American army Is insured.
N"o camp has yet reported leas than
92 per cent of its personnel insured.
: Eight camps out of 32 are 99 per cent
5 insured or better, according to those
" in charge.
I It is now certain inat the goal of
one million men insured by February
j 12 was attained. The total amount of
r insurance actually on the books of the
""" ' I* in?nr?nr? bureau Is now
' $8,879,104,000. This represents 1.:
082,099 applications actually on file.
The average amount of insurance apc
plied for is $8,205. Camp Logan is
' first and Camp Greene second. Camp
' Greene has a total of $313.116.-00 of
$9,870 to a man.
officers in sixty-first
doing fine work
in english classes
The educational wor* in me Sirtyflrst.
regiment is progressing unusually
well. Chaplain Mulligan, the
lieutenants and teachers in charge
J have certainly been faithful to the
task assigned them to produce the
, ? _ ?i.? hv fhp namnles
5 of writing now In the hand* of the
educational director of Y. M. C -A.
? 105, which one would scarcely ber
lieve could be brought about in less
than a month's time. Educational DiJ
rector Myers said that he believed
- every man of the one hundred and
i fifty now receiving instructions in this
e regiment would sign the payroll this
(month, although they were absoluteb
| ly unable to write at all the first of
J the month, and that many would
t! write letters home within the next two
t' weeks. The men have progressed in
. (reading and speaking English equally
as we'.l as In writing.
Sill
ARMY NEWS ^ 1J|J
m FOR ARMY MEN
THEIR HOME FOLKS
No. 20 I^U
COMMANDER IS if
HONORED BT MEN II
Honnrtinn Hnmmander Was
Popular With His Eattcry. Lfriajl
{Interesting Entertainment Stag- |pv<
| ed by Men of Battery C,
Sixteenth Field Artillery. fl
j on t vening of Kebruury -nil ouilthl
j were seen nosing ahotn. They *?isi!? ?! CZZZZZZZrl
| Ihey wore "hunting.'' Thov located BIIILyiJJl
| the game. and bagger it. bringing H yyU Ifl
j tuvoH and tho.se thiog* necessary to tin- wAAl
.decorating of a hall. I'*irst Sergeant fflKAH
] Finn, Acting Color Sergeants Adde!- UJKZH9L.
; Hie! 11 < under the able Hi- VVlW
j formed (he bate mess hall into t most HPanrvS
' rostrum was btiill, with the spi-aki-rV R ft F
i each side of' the- portrait wor- ill- fi
i reKimental rolora. Alioul the -d.-unl P VI ffjj nA
land in fronl in lai-jre neat letter- was" KjvSP
! the follow-in*;: lu nH in H
"Lieutenant Dockum. IB IB 111 ?1
nuiiCTvr. US]
Sixteenth Kield Artillery. " MB Df IWr'M
Down the hall on both sides were flTMfry ft
guidons. while through the center. ran
i decoraticns were beautiful, and show- raKjjfl
< rd : skill and taste in arrangement. Ifjlffjf1
most commendable. Kyyl juU
In front of the rostrum, spare wa ry&JFWJ
reserved for the hand, while just heyond
were the seats of the guests WJjmTJs'
The remainder of the spare was lille.i wVi?
j The Invitations extended to the regi
I mental and battery commander* were iBf/f- |
accepter sgid the men were honored
j with the presence of I he followim: W'f
I onel Bishopi Major Batoman. Batter* |
I Commander Dot-kum. Lieutenant- l/frjM&St
I Ryan. Ripley. Rydout. Davis ISyrd. ran
The "party" was Riven by the me r d'lmf
ill honor of Lieutenant Doekum. wli" j
has been appointed to the school Xj/wQjiA
fire at Kort Bliss. That Lleutenam raVrtw
Dockum was most popular and highl;. Awl
regarded by his men was demonsirated
unmistakably by the cutliiis (g /l
iasm shown in the cheering of tie \ \yf:
men as he entered the hall. and. too \V \ ^
in the manner in which the enter \ f
tairmienl was conducted. Speeche X t <
were made by the officers of the regi- ^1 Vment
and battery, speeches that were
delivered by soldiers in a manly AAA
straight-from-the-shoulder fashion
speeches that went to the hearts of .
the men and gripped them and im- I
pressions were left that gave birth to
inspiration. Battery C is one of the
most efficient organizations in camp *"
and it took no close observer to see
that both officers and men were proud n|^_
of their organization. WfXH
A most interesting program was ar
ranged. The excellent band rendere 1
music during the eventing and ev-er\
number wsts enjoyed. The prograi
follows: Iff' d/K| |m
1. Selections l>y the band. || |ll|f ||[|
2. Songs by Private Kosokowsk II Hill {III
3. Selections by string quartet < II ||IJ| ]||R
Ba"cri"D-. I III! Ill)
I Lieutenant Colonel Bishop. M:iJ" Jfl U|j 11
I Kateinan. Lieutenant nockunt.
j 5. Selections by trio from Halt" |H j j
! Battery'I): Browir, P.alterv C. Secon R 1
i j bout. Lochlln. Battery C; Moome-- p,f ^ j|
I (Continued on Pan? Two.)
- ?
    

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