North Carolina Newspapers

    «r" ■ .■ >
Elkin
I "The Best Little Town
In North Carolina"
VOL. No. XXVI. No. 20
$3,563 ALLOTTED
ELKIN HOSPITAL
FROMDUKEFUND
Total of 95 Hospitals Receive
Endowment Funds
AMOUNTS TO $824,213.00
Roaring Gap Baby Hospital
Receives Sum of $2,039;
Orphanages Benefit
t IS BASED ON FREE CARE
Trustees of the Duke Endow
ment, In session at Charlotte
Tuesday, appropriated $938,499.30
for 95 hospital and 44 orphan
homes In the Carolinas. Among
the hospitals listed was the Hugh
Chatham Memorial Hospital, of
Elkin, and the Roaring Oap hos
pital, at Roaring Oap.
In addition, 28 additional hos
pitals were expected to apply for
aid on their 1936 budgets on the
basis of $1 a day for approxi
mately 148,000 days of free care.
Of the amount appropriated
Tuesday. $824,213 went to hospit
als and $114,286.30 to orphan
homes.
Of the $824,213 allocated to
hospitals, the Hugh Chatham
Memorial hospital received a to
t tal of $3,536. Associated Press
stories as carried in Greensboro
and Winston-Salem dailies, er
roneously gave the Elkin figure
as only $419.
Roaring Oap Baby hospital
was allotted $2,039.
In its announcement of the ap
propriation the endowment said
non-profit hospitals in the Caro
linas had Increased from 48 In
1924, when the endowment was
established by the late James B.
Duke, to 123, and the average of
free patients from 500 daily to 2,-
656. In addition to the rate of
$1 a day for each of these, the
endowment will be asked to con
tribute, it said, approximately
$12.50 each for 78,000 free pa
tients.
The announcement said (he
percentage of free patients in hos
pitals aided by the foundation had
increased from 30 per cent in
*' 1924 to 50 per cent in 1936.
Tuesday's appropriation for
1936 brought, to approximately
$11,500,000 the sum allotted to
hospitals and orphanages since
establishment of the endowment.
AGAINST LAWTO
SET OUT FIRES
Hs
May Not Be Done in Areas
Under Forest Service Pro
tection, Law Provides
AT CERTAIN SEASONS
A bill regulating the setting out
of fires in areas under protection
of the state department of con
servation and develpoment was
passed during the closing sessions
of the state legislature.
Under the new law it is unlaw
ful for any person, firm or cor
poration to start a fire or ignite
any material in any of the areas
of woodland under the protection
of the state forest service, or
within 500 feet of any such pro
tected area between April 1 and
June 15 Inclusive, or between Oc
tober 15 atad December I, inclu
sive any year without first obtain
ing from the state forester or one
of his agents a permit to do so.
No charge is to be made for
granting such a permit.
The act does not apply to fires
started within 500 feet of a
dwelling house. Any person vio
lating the law Is subject to fine
or imprisonment.
Woodlands of Surry county are
under protection of the state for
est service, J. R. Norman being
the county forest warden. Mr.
Norman stated Wednesday morn
ing that all fires should be report
ed to him by telephoning 12-F-3,
or to his assistant. George Royall,
at the Roaring Gap fire tower.
Mr. Royall's telephone number Is
13-P-4.
f CHANGE SERVICE HOUR
AT BAPTIST CHURCH
Beginning with the
Sunday the hour of worship for |
the evening service at the First,
Baptist church will be changed
from 7:30 until 8 o'clock.
A cordial invitation Is extend
ed the public to attend services
at this church.
Women are not always impa
tient. Some of them don't mind
spending a day or two for an ap
pointment in a beauty salon.
THE ELKIN TRIBUNE
IATENEWQ
from the M
State and Nation
SQUARE OFF TO
TEST STRENGTH
Washington, March 30.
Members of the senate judic
iary committee squared off to
day for an inevitable test of
strength on the BoowAreH
court reorganization legisla
tion.
Word spread that there
would be an effort soon to ter
minate hearings on the meas
ure—now In their fourth week
—and thereby shorten the ap
parently long road to a vote in
the senate.
Preliminary to a motion that
this be done, Chairman Ash
ursrt. Democrat, Arizona, ask
ed opponents of the measure
today to agree on a division of
time, with the idea of ending
the hearings on April 17. They
promptly refused.
CROP INSURANCE
PASSED BY SENATE
Washington, March 30.—Bi
partisan support hustled the
administration's crop insurance
, legislation through the senate
today and turned it over to the
house.'
Several hours of debate pro
duced no concerted opposition,
although a number of amend
ments were adopted and Sen
ator King, Democrat, Utah, ar
gued that the government was
"heading toward state social
ism."
INSURGENTS FAIL
TO GAIN MINES
Madrid, March 30. lnsu
rgent attempts to gain Spain's
rich mercury fields collapsed
tonight in what dispatcher
from Cordoba province describ
ed as another major insurgent
defeat.
Shifting their offensive sud
denly to the south after rout
ing the insurgents on the
Guadalajara front, the. gov
ernment forces drove the troops
of Gen. Francisco Franco from
their last remaining strong
holds in the Pozoblanco sector
—Alcaracejos and VWanueva
del Duque.
SEEK TO EASE
LABOR TROUBLE
The national administra
tion's chief labor trouble
shooter joined deadlocked con
ferees seeking to arrange a
working agreement for 400,000
coal miners yesterday.
Assistant Secretary of Labor
Edward F. McGrady talked
with representatives of the
United Mine Workers of Amer
ica and mine operators discuss
ing a new wage and hour con
tract at New York. Unless they
complete a new one or extend
the current compact by mid
night tonight, the union ex
pects to call the men out of the
soft coal pita.
JENKINS TO GIVE
ILLUSTRATED TALK
Rev. Wm. A. Jenkins, pastor of
the Methodist church, will give an
illustrated talk on "How We Got
Our Bible" Sunday evening at
7:30. Theri will be no chatige
for admission. A cordial invita
tion is extended the public to at
tend.
The face on a bank note Is al
ways an easy face to remember.
Express Their
Appreciation
To The Public
Members of the Board of Di
rectors of Hugh Chatham Me
morial Hospital, Rev. L. B. Ab
ernethy, chairman, express
their sincere appreciation to
the public for the fine spirit of
cooperation and generosity in
aiding in building the new
145,000 addition to the hospit
al, actual construction of which
will get underway within a
short time. The many pledgee
are being paid very promptly
and only a small amount of the
money remains to be pledged.
The addition, which will doa
ble the capacity of the hospital,
will fill a great need In this
section. The hospital Is
crowded for space at all times
and often has more patients
than the aresent facilities can
Spanish Fete Queen
' "
ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. . . Cath
erine Canova, in a costume of old
Spain, will be Queen of St. Au
gustine's "Day in Spain." Pro
ceeds are used to restore ancient
landmarks of this oldest city in
the U. S.
CHATHAM IS TO
AGAIN HAVE TEAM
1937 Edition of the Blanket
eers Now at Spring
Practice Here
HOPE FOR GOOD TEAM
A new, 1937 edition of the
Chatham Blanketeers, has already
begun spring practice here in
preparation for the approaching
baseball season.
Information that the Chatham
Manufacturing company will
again put a team into action this
year comes as welcome news to
the many rabid baseball fans
here and in this vicinity, as it
was thought last fall upon the
disbanding of the 1936 team that
a '37 team would not be forth
coming.
A number of the players of last
year's team will again see action
this year, Hoyt Hambright, man
ager, stated Monday, among them
being Davis, Stockton, Jones,
Gough. Mackie and others. How
ever, a large number of last year's
players will see action on other
fields this season.
The Blanketeers of last year
had an excellent season and it is
hoped the forthcoming team will
be equally as good.
SCHOOL GROUNDS
ARE BEAUTIFIED
Paul Gwyn Donates Large
Amount of Shrubbery
and Small Trees
CEMENT WALK IS LAID
Work of beautifying the
grounds of the new Elkin high
school building on Elk Spur
street has been progressing for
several weeks with the construc
tion of a driveway, cement side
walk and small trees and shrub
bery. When the grounds are
sown in grass, the building will
present a very attractive and
pleasing appearance.
Considerable credit in beautify
ing the structure should go to
Paul Gwyn, who generously do
nated a large amount of the
shrubbery, small pines and juni
pers absolutely without charge,
giving much of his time to super
vision of transplanting.
A major portion of the work of
planting the shrubbery was done
by high school boys, under su
pervision of Mr. Qwyn, J. Mark
McAdams, superintendent, Gene
"Toar" Hall and Charles Harris.
ARE TO WORK OUT
DRAINAGE PLANS
On Friday afternoon at 2:00
p. m. a meeting will be held at
the Dobson CCC camp for the
purpose of working out a plan of
cooperation between the state
highway officials and soli con
servation officials in an effort to
work out a better plan of dispos
ing of water from highway drain
age ditches.
The meeting will be in charge
of T. A. Leeper of Elkin, with J.
Muncle, E. A. Schloudt, J. W.
Crawford, L, F. Broomfield, and
tfteen road foremen participat-
ing.
Following the afternoon ses
sion, dinner wili be served by the
staff and an evening ses
sion will fellow.
ELKIN, N. C.. THURSDAY. APRIL 1, 1937
CHATHAM RECEIVES
$1,500,000 ORDER
FROM GOVERNMENT
To Make 250,000 Blankets For
CHATHAM BID LOWEST
Delivery of Blankets to Begin
Immediately and Will Last
Until November
AVERAGE OF $6.03 EACH
The Chatham Manufacturing
Co., of this city and Winston-
Salem, has been awarded a mil
lion, five hundred thousand dollar
order for blankets for the Civilian
Conservation Corps by the United
States government.
The Elkin company was low
bidder on the blankets in bids
which were opened on March 22.
The original offering was 200,000
blankets but the number was
raised to 250,000 later, with Chat
ham Manufacturing company of
fering eight lots of 31,250 each at
prices ranging from $5.90 each
to $6.20 each, an average of $6.03
each for the 250,000, or a total at
this average of $1,507,500.
It has been stated by officials
of the company that the firm
would begin delivering the blank
ets Immediately and that deliv
eries would continue to next No
vember.
All of the 250,000 blankets will
be made in Elkin, then transfer
red to the Winston-Salem plant
for finishing.
HANCOCK TO SPEAK
AT CAMP SUNDAY
Other Speakers Will Also
Feature CCC Camp Open
House At 10 A. M.
FARMERS ARE INVITED
A meeting of wide Interest and
attractiveness is planned at the
Dobscn CCC camp for Sunday
afternoon at 2:00 p. m., with
Hon. Praok Hancock, U. S. Con
gressman from this district, as
the principal speaker for the oc
casion. Other speakers will also
be features of the program, in
cluding Fred L. Ackerson, camp
commander; Dr. J. H. Stallings,
J. W. Crawford, L. F. Broomfield,
county farm agents of Surry and
Yadkin counties, and Newt Mar
tin, representative to the state
legislature.
All day open house will be ob
served beginning at 10:00 a. m.,
with the speaking program com
ing in the afternoon. Amplifiers
are to be installed upon the cam
pus so that all present may hear
the addresses that are to be de
livered.
A large crowd is expected, and
all farmers of this section are
urged to attend.
MRS. W. A. BROWN
DIES FRIDAY P.M.
Brief Illness Caused by Stroke
of Paralysis Fatal to
Yadkin Woman
FINAL RITES ON SUNDAY
,
Mrs. Lydia Thornton Brown, 73,
wife of William A. Brown, of near
Boonville, passed away at her
home Friday night from a brief
illness. Mrs. Brown suffered a
stroke of paralysis early Wednes
day morning from which she nev
er rallted. She was a native of
Yadkin county and a woman
greatly beloved in her community.
For the past fifty-eight years she
had been a member of the Shady
Grove Baptist church.
Surviving besides her husband
are the following sons and daugh
ters: R. A. Brown, of Sumpter
Ore.; Mrs. Gordon Patton, Mrs.
Stella Vanhoy and Mrs. L. T. De
zern, all of Boonville, and Mrs. W.
H. Sneed, of Elkin, route 1. One
brother and one sister surviving
are: Feeder Thornton, of Inde
pendence, Va. and Mrs. Aqullla
Reece, of Boonville.
Funeral services were held
Sunday afternoon at two o'clock
from Boonville Baptist church.
The rites were in charge of Rev.
T. S. Dtraughan of Crutchfield
and Rev. Mr. Spears. Interment
was in the church cemetery.
There is always something. You
find a blessed land free of sinus
trouble, and there you get ma
laria.
The CCC
Latest Model of Sky Lines
RK T \. ii& '*'
LOS ANGELES . . . Pauline Prior, pretty aviatrix, displays a model
of the latest type transport plane. The socitomal model shows all
details of the interior of a large Douglas Sky Liner.
Elkin Merchants Plan
Special Bargain Days
To Be Held Next Week
Next Thursday, Friday and Saturday WUI See Every Elkin
Merchant Offering Extra Big Values for Annual Event.
Prizes to be Given for Mule Race, Oldest Automobile
Contest, Largest Man and Woman, Largest
Family, Etc. Everyone Urged to Attend
Each Day; Good Time Assured
Elkin merchants, working in
cooperation with the Elkin Mer
chants association, are Thursday,
Friday and Saturday of next week
planning amnual Elkin Bargain
Days which will feature, in addi
tion to special values at all stores,
a program of entertainment in
cluding contests, fun and frolic
that will be even more entertain
ing than the programs of pre
vious events of this nature. Cash
prizes will be awarded the various
winners.
Without a doubt, Elkin Bar
gain Days will be really worth
while for everyone who attends,
not purely from the fun they will
get out of it, but from a bargain
standpoint. Bargain Days have
been an annual feature here each
spring for several years, and all
merchants plan for the event sev
eral months in advance, buying
special merchandise in lots large
enough to enable them to offer
really fine values which mean
savings for those who come to buy.
SURRY SCHOOL BOARD
NAMED BY LEGISLATURE
The Surry county school board
for the coming term was appoint
ed recently by the state legisla
ture, it was learned Wednesday
from J. W. Comer, county super
intendent of schools. The mem
bers of the board as appointed
are C. A. McNeil, of Elkin district;
W. T. White, of Dobson; O. T.
Hauser, of Mount Airy; a. W.
Scott, of Shoals; and P. N. Tay
lor of White Plains.
Party lines have been done
away with in the appointment of
the school board, and the old cus
tom of dividing the members of
the school board between the Re
publicans and Democrats has been
abolished. All members of the
present board are Democrats.
Bread And Meat
Exempt—lf You
Buy Separately
Items officially exempted
from sales tax by the 1937 leg
islature are: flour, meal, meat,
lard, milk, molasses, salt, su
gar, coffee, bread and rolls.
But there's a joker present.
Buy meat, and you pay no tax.
Buy bread and ditto. But buy
a bread and meat sandwich at
any cafe for 10 cents, and the
state will ask for a penny. Or
buy milk and your penny is
safe, but have a little sweet or
chooolate syrup added to it
and the concoction shaken up.
and you'll pay a penny, for
then it will be a milkshake.
It is no doubt a great relief
to molasses soppers that the
tax has been removed from
thai commodity. No doubt
millions of dollars will be saved
the mo buses sopping hordes of
the state by the elimination of
this tax.
In commenting on the event
yesterday, Oerge E. Royall, presi
dent of the Elkin Merchants as
sociation, stated that he wished
to extend a cordial invitation to
everyone for miles around to visit
Elkin during the three big days,
not only that they might buy, but
to enjoy the entertainmlnt that
has been prepared and to get bet
ter acquainted with the local
merchants and people. A cordial
spirit of friendship between the
people of a town and the people
living in the country and com
munities around It is much to be
desired, he said.
Among the events scheduled
here for Bargain Days is the pop
ular mule race, which will be held
Friday at 1 p. m. Prizes for this
event follow: first prize, $20.00;
second prize $10.00; third and
fourth prizes $5.00 each.
A new feature, and one that is
expected to create much Interest,
will be the "oldest automobile"
contest. One prize of $20.00 in
cash will be presented to the per
son who brings the oldest automo
bile, running under its own pow
er, to town. This contest will not
be open to dealers, should it turn
out that more than one automo
bile of the same year is entered,
cars will be judged as to appear
ance and performance. Cars
should be registered with Mrs.
Franklin Folger, secretary of the
Elkin Merchants association, at
the Elkin tax office.
The Old Car contest will be held
Thursday morning at 11 o'clock,
and will parade the main streets,
together with a freak circus pa
rade which is being staged under
sponsorship of the American Le
gion.
(Continued on last page)
DEBATES ARE TO
BE HELD FRIDAY
Elkin Teams to Debate With
Mount Airy and Wilkes
boro; Much Interest
WINNERS TO UNIVERSITY
The state triangular debate will
be held Friday afternoon at I; 30.
Mount Airy affirmative and Wil
kesboro negative will debate here.
,At Mount Airy the Elkin negative.
Lesbia Graham and Sammy
Gambill, will meet the Wilkes
boro affirmative. At Wilkes
boro the Elkin affirmative, Alice
McCoin and Edna Billings, will
meet the Mount Airy negative.
The school whose team wins
both the affinitive and nega
tive decisions will go to Chapel
Hll' npril 22 and 23 to compete
with the triangle winners for the
Aycock cup.
I Much Interest is manifested in
the local de'oaters this year, since
list year the local representatives
went to the semi-finals at Chapel
I Hill.
11 ■ -
Elkin
Gateway to Roaring Gap
and the Blue Ridge
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
YADKIN CHILD IS
FATALLY BURNED
TUESDAY MORNING
Dies in Elkin Hospital Tues
day Night
WAS ONLY 4 YEARS OLD
Veatrel Marie Weatherman
Thought to Have Been
Playing in Open Fire
FUNERAL RITES TODAY
Veatrel Marie Weatherman,
four-year old daughter of Mir.
and Mrs. Wiley Weatherman who
reside on the Jonesville-Swan
Creek road, was fatally burned
Tuesday morning about ten
o'clock. The child was rushed to
the local hospital, where she died
about nine o'clock Tuesday night.
According to members of the
family, the child was alone for
only a few minutes in a room
where there was a small bed of
coals in an open fireplace, her
parents being in the yard nearby.
It is believed that she was play
ing in the embers with a piece
of lightwood when her clothing
became ignited. She rushed out
side for help to extinguish the
flames, and when her parents
saw her she was a human torch.
The entire left side of her body
was horribly burned.
Mr. and Mrs. Weatherman are
esteemed citizens and have the
sympathy of the entire section in
their tragic loss.
Funeral services for the child
will be held this morning at 11
o'clock from Swan Creek Baptist
church. The rites will be in
charge of Rev. N. T. Jarvls. In
terment will follow in the church
cemetery.
Surviving in addition to the
parents are two sisters. Jessie
Mae and Ellen and one brother-
Clarence.
JONESVILLE MAN
TAKEN BY DEATH
Hargos Monroe Holbrook
Passes Away Monday Af
ter Lingering Illness '
FUNERAL HELD TUESDAY
Hargos Monroe Holbrook, 64, of
Jonesville, died at Hugh Chatham
Memorial Hospital early Monday
morning following a lingering
complicated illness. His condition
had been critic*! since he was ad
mitted to the hospital several
weeks ago. The deceased was ; a
native of Wilkes county and a son
of che late Mt. and Mrs. John
Holbrook.
He had lived in Jonesville for
a number of years.
Surviving are ten children:
Miss Nettie Holbrook. Mrs. E. G.
Jordon, Mrs. H. C. Lyons, Mrs.
J. B. Mitchell, Mrs. Claude Mason,
Monroe, Noah, Everette and Bal
tus Holbrook/of Elkin and Jones
ville, and Mrs. J. E. Harris, of
Mount Airy.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock
from Liberty Orove Baptist
church, in charge of Rev. R. E.
Adams, of Mayodan, and Rev. J.
L. Powers. Interment was in the
church cemetery.
Tribune Is To
Appear Two
Days Earlier
In order to better cooperate
with Elkin merchants in stag
ing Elkin Bargain Day* here
next Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, The Tribune will
'ubllsh its Bargain Days edi
tion next Monday night in
stead of on the usual publish
ing date, so that the paper may
be widely circulated prior to
the trade event.
With 5,000 extra copies to be
printed and mailed and the pa
ter to appear two full days
earMer, it Is highly Important
that merchants planning ad
vertisements In the Issue turn
over their ad. copy as early as
posslMe this week-end, other
wise It will be impossible to get
the paper out as scheduled.
Cooperation by the merchants
to this effect will be greatly
appreciated.
Country correspondents are
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view