North Carolina Newspapers

    -Hie Best Little !Wi»
In North Carolina"
VOL. No. XXVI. No. 35
SEN. BAILEY ENDS
ATTACK ON COURT
REFORM PROGRAM
Court Bill is Aimed at Liber
ties, He Says
NO ATTACK ON F. D. R.
Says Sole Motive is to Pre
serve Rights of Nation;
Wants Free Judiciary
MAY SIT-DOWN ON BILL
Washington, July 13. Re
suming his speech in the Benate
in opposition to the court reor
ganization bill, Senator Josiah W.
Baiiley today charged that the
proposed legislation was an at
tempt to wipe out the liberties
handed down to them by their
founding forefathers and its en
actment into law would lead to
absolutism, a totalitarian state
and a European dictatorship.
The senior North Carolina sen
ator today broadened his attack
on President Roosevelt and at the
same time insisted he was not at
tacking the Chief Executive. He
complained that the newspapers
had interpreted his remarks yes
terday as an attack on the Presi
dent.
While the North Carolinian was
sinking his shafts of criticism in
the legislation, the court issue was
taking a new turn in the House
with Chairman Hatton Sumners,
of the House judiciary committee
urging that the proposal be shelv
ed. He indicated the substitute
bill would never get out of his
committee even if It passed the
Senate.
Representative Zebulon Weaver
a high ranking member and sup
port of the President's court pro
posal, took a different position.
He expressed the opinion that if
the Senate passed the measure
the House would nave the oppor
tunity to vote on it.
With the Senate galleries pack
ed and an estimated crowd of 400
clamoring for admittance, Sena
tor Bailey traced history of con
stitutional government and the
rebellion of the settlers of Amer
ica against "king controlled
courts."
After citing the Supreme Court
decisions in the AAA and NRA
cases restricting the powers of
Congress, Bailey said:
"The effort here now, the mo
tive here now, is to create a court
that will give us the power the
courts said we do not have."
FIRE DESTROYS
HANES' CABIN
Blaze Believed to Have Origi
nated From Bolt of
Lightning
SAVE SOME FURNITURE
Fire believed to have originated
from a bolt of lighting Wednesday
afterpoon destroyed a guest cabin
near the John W. Hanes hunting
lodge adjoining Klondike farm.
The cabin, containing several
rooms and richly furnished, was
found to be ablaze inside shortly
after the rain and electrical
storm which took place between
noon and 1:00 p. m. Due to the
dense smoke volunteers were able
to remove only a part of the fur
nishings.
A call for the Elkin fire depart
ment was refused due to the re
cent ruling of town officials pro
hibiting the local firemen from
going outside the city limits. Due
to lack of water, it was thought
doubtful jthat the firemen could
have been of aid had they gone
to the scene of the blaze.
Murder Mystery
Starts in This
Issue of Tribune
Readers of The Tribune who
enjoy thrilling mystery stories
are invited to begin the new
serial story "The Penthouse
Murder," by Caleb Johnson,
which starts in this issue.
The story opens with a mur
der in a penthouse high atop a
New York skyscraper, and from
that point onward, each chap
ter is a succession of thrills
and mystery that will appeal
to everyone who enjoys mystery
stories.
Turn now to "The Penthouse
Murder," ami read chapter 1
of this absorbing new serial,
THE ELKIN TRIBUNE
' • ... ' £ .. *• , : "-■.i-v-' . ,
Gives Self Up
HPpmmmmm
Chicago, 111. . . . Eluding the
police of several states for three
months, Robert Irwin, wanted for
the murder of three in New York
City on Easter, surrenders to local
authorities.
IATENEWC
from the
State and Nation
ROOSEVELT SAYS
RENTS TOO HIGH
Washington, July 13. Pres
ident Roosevelt, asserting that
Americans pay too much for
rent, ordered a government
survey today of means by
which their rental expendi
tures may be reduced.
He announced the project at
his press conference after con
ferring with representatives of
nine federal agencies dealing
with housing problems.
The President described the
rental problem as a very ser
ious one, which he said the ad
ministration so far has not
taken up vigorously.
WILL SAVE
N. C. PULP SUPPLY
Morehead City, July 13.
The state board of conservation
and development authorized a
forest management program
today to perpetuate the state's
pulp wood supply.
Meeting in its annual sum
mer session, the board favor
ed educational methods of in
creasing wood growth and au
thorized establishment of a
forestry nursery in Western
North Carolina.
The nursery, the board de
cided, would raise seedlings for
distribution in the mountain
area.
FORECAST GOOD
CROPS FOR STATE
Raleigh, July 13. Two
State college extension special
ists joined today in forecasting
improved yields of farm crops
and better conditions for poul
trymen in North Carolina this
year.
E. C. Blair, extension agron
omist, said rainfall 99 per cent
normal in April, May and Jane
had resulted in the condition
of pastures and the corn crop
being good and this was con
sidered "indicative of the gen
eral conditions of crops."
AGAINST FEDERAL
MEDICAL CARE
Raleigh, July 13. The ex
ecutive committee of the State
Medical Society adopted a reso
lution today expressing "une
quivocal opposition to any plan
for federal control over the
medical care of indigents.
"Such care is distinctly a
state and county responsibil
ity," said the resolution, pass
ed at a meeting here. "The
care of the indigent and other
social aspects of medical prac
tice are community problems."
SURRY CIVIL COURT
CONVENES MONDAY
Surry County Superior court,
for the hearing of civil cases only,
convened Monday morning at
10:00 a. m., with Judge P. Don
ald Phillips presiding.
Up to Wednesday morning but
very few cases had been disposed
of, all of which were minor cases,
with the case* of A. J. Snow vs.
The Atlantic and Yadkin R. R.
Co. coming up for hearing Wed
nesday, which was expected to
consume the entire day, or more.
All court attendants and offi
cers were sweating under a ruling
of the Judge, made Monday morn
ing, that they should wear their
coats while court was in session.
FARM LOAN BILL
VETO OVERRIDDEN
BY LOWER HOUSE
Fate Now Rests With The
Senate /
WARNING IS IGNORED
Measure Threatens Balanced
Budged, Roosevelt
Points Out
CONCERNS SMALL LOANS
Washington, July 13. The
House late today overrode Presi
dent Roosevelt's veto of a bill to
extend low interest rates on fed
eral farm land bank loans for an
other year despite a stern White
House warning that the measure
presents a $30,000,000 threat to a
balanced budget.
The vote was 260 to 97.
Fate of the bill now lies in the
Senate which also must override
before the measure can become
law. Early action is improbable
since it cannot be called up until
the controversial judicial reorgan
ization bill is disposed of.
The vote came after Majority
Leader Sam Rayburn (D), Tex.,
appealed for support of the Pres
ident on the ground that the farm
emergency had passed and that
that loan bill set up a dangerous
precedent which other federal
agencies might be called upon to
follow.
His arguments were lost how
ever, in the sharp struggle that
saw one of Mr. Roosevelt's ablest
House lieutenants, Chairman
Marvin Jones (D), Tex., of the
agriculture committee join with
Republicans in pleading that Mr.
Roosevelt's veto be overturned.
It was the second time this ses
sion that the House had scuttled
a presidential veto. On June 2, the
House and Senate quickly voted to
pass over Mr. Roosevelt's veto a
measure extending for five years
the privilege to war veterans to
convert their was risk insurance
into other policies offered by the
veterans administration.
Under the farm bill vetoed by
the President, interest rates on
federal farm loans would continue
to be 3% per cent fdr one year
and 4 per cent thereafter. Inter
est rates on land bank commis
sioner loans would be reduced
fro mfive to four per cent. Mr.
Roosevelt told Congress that it
would cost the government $30,-
000,000 during the 1938 flscaf
year and would disorganize pres
ent plans for a balanced budget.
IS AGAINST LAW
TO SHOOT BIRDS
Complaints are Made Locally
Concerning Shooting of
Firearms
IS DANGEROUS PRACTICE
A number of complaints have
been made recently concerning
the wanton killing of birds and
small game in and around Elkin
by people with small calibre
rifles.
All birds are protected by both
state and federal laws and anyone
caught shooting them is subject
to arrest and fine. It is also
against the law to shoot any kind
of firearms within the city lim
its.
In one instance, it was learned,
a local citizen was narrowly
missed by a bullet thought -to
have been fired a,t a bird. Not
only is the shooting of such wild
life against the law, but the fir
ing of guns is highly dangerous,
it was pointed out.
H. F.'BYRD HONORED
ON 55TH BIRTHDAY
A large number of friends and
relatives gathered at the home of
Hilliary P. Byrd, near Benham,
Sunday, to celebrate the fifty
fifth birthday anniversary of Mr.
Byrd. The affair came as a
complete surprise to the honor
guest and was thoroughly en
joyed. Upon his arrival home
from Sunday school the tables
had been erected and approxi
mately two hundred guests had
assembled for the affair.
Preceding the bountiful dinner,
talks were made by Rev. Q. W.
Curry and Rev. Grant Cothren.
Rev. M. P. Barker offered the
invocation.
During the afternoon several
favorite selections were sung and
friendships and acquaintances
renewed.
ELKIN, N. C., THURSDAY, JULY 15, 1937
FIRST ENGLISH CHURCH AND FIRST ENGLISH FORT RESTORED
ON ORIGINAL SITES AT ROANOKE ISLAND, NORTH CAROLINA
SBBBlroWwLJ** 1 \ j
The First English Church in America
Pictured above is Old Chapel, reproduced.according to
the most authentic records of the Chapel originally
erected by the "Lost Colony," which settled at Roanoke
Island, North Carolina, in 1587. The 100 men, 12 women
and 9 children, which made up this Colony completely
disappeared, the only traces left being a few broken
pieces of armor and the word "Croatoan" carved on a
UNUSUALLY HEAVY
RAIN FALLS HERE
Home in Sunset Park Hit by
Lightning During Storm
Monday Afternoon
ONE HORSE IS KILLED
Elkin was visited by an unusu
ally heavy rain and electrical
storm Monday afternoon, when
1.90 inches of rain fell in 1 hour
and 45 minutes. According to Mrs.
C. N. Bodenheimer, who has kept
official weather records here for
approximately the past thirty
years, this is the heaviest rainfall
on record, being even greater than
that during the heavy floods in
July, 1916.
During the storm the home of
Clarence Holcomb, electrician, lo
cated in Sunset Park, was struck
by a bolt of lightning. The bolt
hit of the home and
followed an electric light wire to
a stock barn, instantly killing one
of his horses. The bolt struck
with such force that the horse
was hurled from the barn into an
adjoining pasture. Another horse
in an adjoining stable was unin
jured. Members of the family
were uninjured by the bolt.
As a result of the storm many
telephones have been out-of-ord
er.
Pres. Roosevelt
Is Photographed
By Fred Norman
President Franklin D. Roose
velt, surrounded by secret ser
vice men, rode slowly along
Constitution avenue, in Wash
ington, on an official inspec
tion of hundreds of Boy Scouts
who were In the capitol at
tending the National Jamboree.
Stretching in long lines be
fore him were the Jamboree
Scouts, standing straight at
attention.
Onward moved the White
House oar bearing the nation's
chief executive. It was a solemn
occasion. The presidential
guards, as always, alertly
scanned the crowds fftr any
sign of possible danger to the
President.
Suddenly a youthful figure
darted from the ranks of
Scouts and aimed at the Pres
ident of the United States.
"Click!"—and a picture of the
president had been made by
none other than Fred Norman,
of Elkin.
According to reports here,
Fred, who is a Scout, but who
was-not attending the Jam
boree, n*n himself out of breath
up Constitution Avenue, mak
ing pictures of the president.
Whether the films turned out
okey has not been learned.
Young Norman, Bobby Chat
ham and Billy Graham, all of
Elkin, made the trip to Wash
ington with Mr. and Mrs. J.
Mark McAdams and their
daughter, Mary Vance. During
the trip the party also visited
Annapolis and Gettysburg.
1 tree. One of the members of the Colony was Virginia
: Dare, the first child born of English parents in Amer
i- lea, August 18th, 1587. The restored Chapel will contain
| .the few remaining relics of the ill-fated Colony. The
? 350 th anniversary of the "Lost Colony" will be com
-5 memorated at Roanoke Island, North Carolina, in a
g series of celebrations from July 4th to September 4th.
| By special act of Congress, a commemorative half dol
■: Jar has been minted and a stamp honoring the 350 th
I anniversary of the birth of Virginia Dare will be Issued.

I The First English Fort in America
I Above is pictured "The Block House" restored on the
site of the original, which was built by the first English
colonists to arrive in America at Roanoke Island, North
Carolina. Governor John White, leader of this first
English settlement in the new world, sailed for Eng
land for additional supplies. Upon his return four
years later the entire Colony had disappeared and no
living member was ever heard from again. He describes
.the "Block House" as "A place very strongly enclosed
with a high palisade of great trees, with curtains and
flankers and very •fort-like'."
Senator Robinson
Dies Unexpectedly
At Washington
Senator Joseph T. Robinson,
Democrat, of Arkansas, died
unexpectedly in Washington
Wednesday morning.
Senator Robinson's death
came as a great shock to ev
eryone who knew him, and "is
a great blow to the entire na
tion," President Roosevelt
stated upon learning of the
death of the veteran senator.
Senator Robinson was a close
friend of the President and
was leading Mr. Roosevelt's
fight for court reform.
ANSWER IS DRAWN
IN ELECTION CASE
Poplin Denies Allegations
that Election Returns
Were Changed
TO BE TRIED IN AUGUST
An answer in the Wilkes county
election case in which D. B.
Swaringen, Republican, is suing
Leet Poplin, Democrat, for title
to office as a member of the
board of county commissioners,
on the claim of a mistake of 100
votes in the returns from Rock
Creek township, has been drawn
by attorneys for Mr. Poplin.
The answer denies allegations
that the election returns from
Rock Creek township were chang
ed and denies charges of fraud in
the election.
In denying the allegations that
Poplin was not legally and law
fully elected, it is further point
ed out that not only was he le
gally elected, but was given a
certificate of election by the
county board of elections and that
he has been serving as a member
of the board of commissioners
since December, 1936.
The answer also avers that a
mandamus action brought by Mr.
Swaringen soon after the election
and which was dismissed by Judge
J. H. Clements, covered the same
matters in controversy. The an
swer further alleges failure on the
part of the plaintiff to protest
the vote or returns before
board of elections, bars his right
to maintain suit or to recover in
the action.
The case is expected to be call
ed when the August term of Wil
kes superior court convenes on
the first Monday in August. It
is expected that approximately
450 witnesses will be summoned,
counsel for Swaringen claiming
that 411 voters in Rock Creek
township have signed affidavits
that they cast votes' for Swarin
gen in Rock Creek on November
3, although returns from thai
township showed only 341 votes
for Swaringen.
Snow seen in moving picture
settings may be any one of sev
eral materials. Some of the most
common Imitations are potato
flakes, white plaster, marble dust,
asbestos, pyrocell and shaved ice.
SURRYTOPAY
ABOUT $20,000
Figure Represents County's
Part Annually for So
cial Security
ABOUT 650 ELIGIBLE
According to figures recently
released from Raleigh, Surry
county will have to pay out
around $20,000 annually for so
cial security, that amount repre
senting the county's part of the
approximately $65,000 which will
go for old age and child relief in
Surry.
The state board has estimated
that there are 350 in Surry coun
ty eligible for old age relief and
300 dependent children entitled
to assistance.
Bausie Marion, Surry county
welfare officer, has already re
ceived approximately 200 appli
cations for relief funds. He ad
vised those eligible for assistance
not to be too hasty in making
their applications as only the ex
tremely needy cases will be han
dled at present. Within the near
future he will have dates at var
ious places in the county where
the people can meet with him
without having to go to the extra
trouble of traveling to Dobson or
other Surry towns. Under the
present schedule Mr. Marion is at
Mount Airy every Tuesday and
Friday, Elkin every Thursday
and Dobson every Monday, Wed
nesday and Saturday morning.
BARN, MULES ARE
DESTROYED SUNDAY
Lightning Strikes Structure
On Farm of Hinson
Harris
IS CONSUMED BY FIRE
A team of mules, several hogs,
a light truck, 150 bushels of small
grain and feed, and numerous
farm implements were destroyed
by fire Sunday afternoon as the
result of a bolt of lightning which
struck a practically new stock and
feed barn belonging to Hinson
Harris, about two miles west of
Jonesvllle.
The barn was hit during a se
vere rain storm, and members of
the family did not know it was in
flames until too late to save the
stock or other contents.
About two weeks ago the Har
ris home was struck by lightning
and set on fire, but the flames
were quickly extinguished with
but small damage to the house.
SURRY SANITARY
OFFICER .NAMED
Charles Butler, of Morganton,
has recently been elected sanitary
inspector for the public health de
partment of Surry county and ar
rived In Mount Airy the first of
July to take up his duties. Mr.
Butler recently completed a spe
cial course in sanitary inspection
at the University of North Caro
lina. He succeeds E, P. Hale.
Mr. Butler and his family will
reside in Mount Airy.
Gateway to Roaring Gap
and the Blue Ridge
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
60 NAVY PLANES
REPORT FAILURE
ON FIRST FLIGHT
Fail to Find Trace of Amelia
Earhart
21,000 SQUARE MILES
Are Continuing Search From
Decks of Navy Carrier
Lexington
BELIEVE SMALL HOPE
Honolulu, July 13.—Sixty planes
from the U. S. S. Lexington
scanned the lonely South Pacific
Sea today in a gigantic "last
chance" search for some sign of
Amelia Earhart and Fred J. Noo
nan, lost eleven days off tiny
Howland Island.
From the broad flight deck of
the aircraft carrier the planes
rocketed and spread spokewise,
in the greatest search the navy
had attempted.
The planes returned at 4 p. m.
(e.s.t.) after scanning 21,000
square miles and made ready for
immediate refueling for an after
noon flight which would extend
farther southward and include
the immediate vicinity of How
land.
The sea was smooth, after a
tropic storm last night and con
ditions were so improved the navy
fliers could scan the water from
a height of 500 feet.
During morning flight of the
Lexington aircraft, the pilots were
under orders to sweep the seas
southward of the great carrier.
They took off when the Lexington
was 120 miles northwest of How
land and sped over the horizon
just as the sun came into view.
The sixty planes took up as
signed psitions two miles apart,
in two divisions, one on each side
of the mother ship. Each pilot
was accompanied by an observer.
Many naval officers believed
the chances of finding Miss Ear
hart and Noonan remote; that
they were lost, with their ship,
beneath the waves.
For days the search was made
by sea and air, first by the cutter
Itasca, then by a British freight
er and the minesweeper Swan;
finally by the battleship Color
ado which catapulted three planes
into the air repeatedly to search
Tiny Islands in the area, and of
the intervening sea.
With the arrival of the Lexing
ton the search entered its final
stages.
The 60 planes from its deck
were being flown under instruc
tions that would plot every square
mile of sea and every tiny reef
in the lonely area.
BREAK RECORD
The Soviet trans-polar
plane, which left Moscow
Sunday on an attempted non
stop flight to the United
States, landed at Riverside,
California, Wednesday morn
ing, to shatter the non-stop
distance record by approxi
mately 500 miles.
The big plane, it was said,
landed when fuel ran krw.
LEGION, AUXILIARY
PLAN PICNIC TODAY
Members of the George Gray
Post of the American Legion and
their families and members of the
Legion Auxiliary will hold a joint
picnic this evening (Thursday)
at 7:30 at the community play
ground. All members of both or
ganizations are invited to attend
and bring their families. Follow
ing the picnic supper a business
session of the Legion will be held
at which time post officers for the
coming year will be elected.
»r«;jwn:i
■SUITOR/ HAJ
BETTER MEM*RIEX THAN
MO/T ]>FBTO"R/.
'
    

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