North Carolina Newspapers

    ■■■
Elkin
"The Best Little Town
In North Carolina"
VOL. No. XXVII. No. 2
ULTIMATUM GIVEN
WALL STREET BY
PRES. ROOSEVELT
New Deal Agency Cracks
Down on Financial Group
UTILITY PARLEY HELD
President Makes Progress To
ward Understanding With
Power Executive
FEUD MAY BE ENDED
Washington, Nov. 23. The
Roosevelt administration cracked
down on Wall street tonight, ser
ving an ultimatum that the stock
exchange must reorganize or be
regulated much more drastically.
"Adequate safeguards" must be
thrown about this and other ex
changes, either by the marts
themselves or the securities com
' mission, said William O. Douglas,
chairman of the commission.
The surprise move recalled that
Wall streets and new dealers have
been hurling recriminations,
blaming each other in part for the
present business recession. Some
administration advisers have ac
cused Wall street of "leaning on
its shovel," while their critics
have blamed restrictions imposed
by the government.
The Douglas announcement
capped a series of rapid-fire devel
opments, all bearing on the busi
ness situation:
1. President Roosevelt confer
red with President Wendell L.
Wilkie, of Commonwealth and
Southern corporation, and report
ed progress toward an understand
ing which, If reached, might end
the feud between private power
and government, and embark the
companies on a vast construction
program. Mr. Roosevelt announc
ed that Wilkie personally sided
with the President in the latter's
contention that utility rates should
be based on common law (prudent
investment) theories of valuation,
rather than reproduction or orig-
JJflftl tfcst.
2. Mr. Roosevelt announced that
to encourage home-building he
favored permitting the federal
housing administration to insure
mortgages up to 90 per cent of
the value of homes, instead of 8Q
per cent as at present.
3. A house committee decided
tentatively to wipe out all but a
trace of the undistributed profits
tax, target of business criticism.
Sixty-two house Republicans
unanimously demanded outright
repeal of the levy.
WILBUR CARTER
CLUB PRESIDENT
E. W. McDaniel is Elected
Vice-President of Local
Kiwanis Group
HALL IS SEC'Y-TREAS.
Election of officers for the year
1938 featured the weekly meet
ing of the Elkin Kiwanis club at
Hotel Elkin last Thursday evening.
Wilbui' Carter, present vice
president ut the club, was elevated
to the presidency, while E. W. Mc-
Daniel was named vice-president.
Julius Hall, a member of the pres
ent board of directors, was named
secretary-treasurer.
Those named as directors for
the coming year were as follows:
Dr. R. B. Harrell, Earl James, H.
F. Laffoon, Foley Norman, Hugh
Royall and Stacy Weaver.
Installation of officers will be
held early in January, 1938.
Last Thursday's program was in
charge of Wilbur Carter, who had
present as his guests a number
of Boy Scouts of the Elkin and
jonesville troops. Mr. Carter laud
ed the work of Dr. Wm. A. Jen
kins and Dr. C. E. Nicks, wifin
scout officials, and of Harvey
Madison, Jonesville scout official.
The following scouts gave dem
onstrations of scout activities:
Jimmie Harrell, Fred Norman,
Billy Graham, Dickie Smith, Jr.,
of the Elkin troops, and Kemp
Reece of the Jonesville troop.
PLEASE
Local merchants who are
planning advertisements In
next week's annual Christmas
edition of The Tribune are urg
ed to cooperate with the Tri
bune by releasing their adver
tising copy at the earliest mo
ment possible. Such coopera
tion will be sincerely appreci
ated.
THE ELKIN TRIBUNE
She's A Sailor's Sweetheart
s(¥ ; ...
-If if
tm
Weuy Alice Alexanderoon wrote the President asking to tret ho
sailor beau, Bradford Greene, released from the last year of his six
year hitch in the Navy. Reason: Bradford wrote the score for the
play "Right This Way," produced by Alice and having its premiere
in Cleveland. Alice wanted "to get Brad, out of the Navy so he could
enjoy the success facing him." Brad got a month's leave, but no dis
charge.
LEWELLYN NAMED
COMMITTEE HEAD
Will Act as Chairman of Sur
ry Group for Promotion
of Hospitality
WILLIAMS IN YADKIN
Governor Clyde Hoey has named
R. C. Lewellyn, of Dobson, as
chairman of the Surry county hos
pitality committee, a chairman
also being named for this group
in each of the other 99 counties
in the state.
As chairman of the Surry com
mittee, Mr. Lewellyn will be ex
pected to appoint from five to 15
residents of the county to serve
with him.
The duties of the hospitality
committee will be to contact
places in the county which deal
with the traveling and tourist
public with a view to developing
and increasing the hospitable
spirit among the people of the
county.
Chairmen in some of the neigh
boring counties, which have been
named by Governor Hoey, are as
follows: Yadkin, Grover Williams;
Wilkes, Sheriff Claude Doughton;
Stokes, S. P. Christian; Forsyth,
George L. Irvin, Jr.
Mr, Lewellyn is president of the
Bank of Elkin here.
ON RELIEF, $2,000
IS FOUND IN HOME
Wilkes Woman Who Died
Here of Burns, Was By No
Means Destitute
GOOD CLOTHES FOUND
Notwithstanding the fact that
she was on relief at the time she
died in the Elkin hospital from
burns suffered earlier the same
day, Mary. Bauguss, 63, whose
clothes became ignited from an
open fire Monday of last week,
was by no means destitute as the
discovery of over $2,000 in cash,
found in her home, disclosed
shortly after her death, in addi
tion to the money, an abundance
of good clothing was found stored
in the house, although the wo
man wore rags.
She had lived alone the past
year since the death of her moth
er, and Monday morning peigh
bors, hearing her scream, rushed
to the home to find her lying on
the floor, her clothes burning. The
ilames were extinguished, and she
was brought to the hospital here
where she died.
Tuesday when neighbors went
to the home to look after the
household they found the most
curious circumstances ever beheld
in a home in this part of the
state. The first money, SIOB, was
found lying on the floor wrapped
in an old newspaper. Search un
covered money in at least 50
places in the dilapidated three
room bungalow.
Sums from a few cents to sev
eral dollars were found in snuff
boxes, soda boxes, cabinets, cup
boards, old clothes, baking powder
cans, shoes, in fact in almost ev
ery place where money was least
exppcted to be found.
1 Seven men searched Tuesday
and Wednesday and when all
| their findings were collected, they
had over $2,000, including SIOO in
gold coins, SBO in dimes, 70 silver
dollars, S9O to gold certificates,
(Continued on last page)
WOMAN'S CLUB IS
TO SPONSOR SALE
Christmas Seals Will Be Sold
Under Direction of Mrs.
E. F. McNeer
IS FOR GREAT CAUSE
The health of Elkin and Surry
county depends to a great extent
on the alertness of its citizens in
combating communicable dis
eases. When a disease, such as tu
berculosis can not only be cured
but also prevented and even erad
icated, that disease demands im
mediate attention. The attention
and the financial support must
come from the rich and the poor,
the young and the old.
Public-spirited citizens who
value their own health, and the
health of their families and the
community, can do their part in
helping to rout this disease from
Elkin by purchasing and using
Tuberculosis Christmas Seals,
Which go on sale November 30.
The income from these penny
seals enables a year-round cam
paign to be waged against tuber
culosis so that every man, woman,
and child and every home will
be safe from this disease. When
it is brought to mind that tuber
culosis, more than any other dis
ease, kills more people between
the ages of 15 and 40, we should
be more anxious than ever to do
our part, no matter how small, in
helping to eradicate this scourge.
The seal sale this year will be
sponsored by the Woman's Club,
under the direction of Mrs. E. P.
McNeer, assisted by a corps of
of workers.
DEATto CLAIMS MOUNT
AIRY WOMAN SATURDAY
Mrs. Effie McGinty Mackie,
wife of Thomas H. Mackie of
Mount Airy, died Saturday night
"about 11 o'clock in a Mount Airy
hospital, where she had been a
patient for two weeks. Mrs.
Mackie had been in declining
health for sometime.
A native of Navosota, Texas,
Mrs. Mackie had made her home
in North Carolina for a number
of years. She resided here sever
al years ago and has a host of
friends here.
She is survived by her husband,
one brother and one sister, Lee
McQinty and Mrs. T. H. Honcke,
both of Navasota, Texas.
Funeral services were held at
the home in Mount Airy Monday
afternoon. Interment was in the
Mackie family cemetery at Yad
kin ville.
Elkin Merchants ToHold
Christmas Opening Dec. 3
Next week The Tribune will
present its annual Christmas
Shoppers edition carrying news of
the gala Christmas opening on
the part of all Elkin stores Fri
day, December 3.
At a recent meeting of Elkin
merchants, it was decided that all
merchants would cooperate In the
opening, and as a result, the ma
jority of Elkin stores will be
dressed in full holiday attire Fri
day of next week.
Cooperating with the stores In
carrying their Christmas messages
next week, The Tribune will ap
pear dressed in an attractive
ELKIN. N. C„ THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 25, 1937
IATENEWC
*" J from the
State and Nation
DUKE ENDOWMENT
AIDS 124 HOSPITALS
Charlotte, Nov. 23. The
12th annual report of the hos
pital section of the Duke en
dowment released today, show
ed assistance had been given
during the year to 124 hospitals
in the Carol!nas.
The number, the report said
was the largest assisted during
any year since the endowment
was founded and a gain of 72
hospitals as compared with
1925, the first year assistance
was given to hospitals.
WILKES CHILD
KILLED BY MULE
North Wilkesboro, Nov. 23.
Ben Johnson, 10-year-old son
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank John
son, of Walnut Grove township
was trampled to death yester
day while helping his father
in dragging logs to a sawmill.
According to reports of the
accident, the lad was leading
one of the mules in his fath
er's team and his brother, Rob
ert, was leading the other, fol
lowing their father, when the
mule behind Ben suddenly
made for the child and tram
pled him to death.
JAPS TAKE
CUSTOMS CONTROL
Shanghai, Nov. 23. Con
trol of Shanghai's customs
passed into JapuuM hands to
day by an arrangement with
Sir Frederick Mase, British In
spector general of Chinese cus
toms.
Sir Frederick appointed Yo
shisuke Akatani administrative
commissioner of customs for
Shanghai, China's wealthiest
port, and Keiichi Kato revenue
accountant for the Shanghai
area.
The appointments, it was be
lieved, were made to prevent
Shanghai customs administra
tion from becoming an inter
national issue.
NEW TAX FORMULA
IS DESIGNED
Washington, Nov. 23. A
new tax formula, designed to
help both big and little busi
ness, took firm outline today in
response to the loud congres
sional clamor for legislation to
improve economic conditions.
While the house saw a re
newed drive for enactment of
wage and hour legislation and
the senate began debate on the
crop control bill, the house sub
committee on taxation reached
its most important decision of
the session to date.
Tentatively, it agreed upon a
plan which would all but aban
don the much-denounced tax
on the profits which a corpora
tion retains to put back into
its business or to provide a
"depression cushion/"
START MEMORY SHELF
AT PUBLIC LIBRARY
At the request of several mem
bers of the Woman's Club, a
memory shelf has been started in
the public library and. the dona
tions are inscribed with the name
of the donor and the person in
whose memory they are given.
Those desiring to donate books in
memory of some loved one or
friend are invited to do so. Sever
al books have already been re
ceived for this shelf.
Acknowledgement is made of
the donation to the library fund
by Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Greene.
three-color jacket and will have
news of the many fine gift offer
ings that may be obtained in lo
cal stores this Christmas season.
Another feature designed to
make Elkin a real Christmas gift
center will be the installation of
street decorations. Plans have
been made to decorate Main
street with Christmas lights and
evergreens. These street decora
tions will be installed within a
short while.
Complete details concerning the
Christmas opening here will ap
pear in next week's Tribune.
The Airacuda Is A Deadly Bird
bp^-^^
Now being tested by Army Engineers, the multi-place fighting
plane shown above is designed to combat ships of the "Flying Fort
ress" type. Named "Airacuda" after the deadly barracuda, most sav
age of fish, this plane mounts automatic guns, two small cannon,
carries bombs, has interchangeable stations for combat crews. Her
two pusher-type propellers can whirl at the rate of 300 miles per hour.
GENE (TOAR) HALL
TO SING IN SHOW
"Hometown Jamboree" to
Feature Unusual Enter
tainment Here Dec. 10
GLEE CLUB HAS PART
"Hometown Jamboree," featur
ing a variety of comedy, songs
and dancing, plus quite a bit of
plain foolishness, will be present-*
ed here Friday evening, Decem
ber 10, from the stage of the Ly
ric Theatre. Proceeds of the show
will go to the high school athletic
fluid.
A number of entertainers who
have appeared in previous shows
here will be in the cast, plus quite
a bit of new talent, including the
high school glee club, under the
direction of Mrs. J. Henry Beeson;
songs by Gene (Toar) Hall, and
several other acts that are now
being prepared and which will be
announced later.
Among those who have taken
part in previous shows, and who
will appear in "Hometown Jambo
ree," are Byron Bryan, come
dian; Leon Martin, tenor, and a
number of others who have made
hits from the local stage.
The show is being staged by
Alan Browning, Jr., who will act
as master of ceremonies, and who
has announced a novel feature
attraction never before seen on
any stage—"The Wild Man and
his Wife from Borneo," who will
actually be present in person, al
though heavily chained and well
guarded.
Although all details of the show
have not been completed, it is
believed that "Hometown Jam
boree" will offer more real enter
tainment and fun than any pre
vious home talent show presented
here. It will be staged following
the showing of an excellent movie
—"Exclusive," and will be approx
imately 45 minutes to one hour In
length.
Further details of the show will
be announced later.
MAN IS INJURED
IN AUTO WRECK
Charlie Harris, of Glade Val
ley, Carried to Hugh
Chatham s Hospital
CRASHED ON MOUNTAIN
Charlie Harris, of Glade Valley
was in an unconscious condition
at Hugh Chatham hospital here
late Wednesday afternoon as the
result of an automobile accident
which occurred on the highway
leading up the mountain to Roar
ing Gap.
The accident occurred between
3 and 4 o'clock Wednesday after
noon. Harris, accompanied by J.
D. Brawley, also of Glade Valley
were coming down the mountain
in a car when it went out of con
trol and crashed against a guard
rail.
Harris sustained an injury to
his left shoulder and possibly
other hurts, the examination at
the hospital having not been
completed at last information
available to The Tribune.
Brawley, it was understood, was
not injured other than a severe
shaking up, and bruises.
Observe Holiday
All local stores, with the excep
tion of drug stores, will be closed
today in observance of Thanks
giving. The Bank of Flkin and
the postoffice, will also observe
a holiday.
Fights Measles
New York City . . . Dr. Jean
Broadhurst, Professor of Bacteri
ology, Columbia, announces the
location of the virus causing
measles, one of the most common
communicable diseases. Doctors
may now identify and isolate cases
several days earlier than before
thus detecting carriers and open
ing way to control and prevention
of the disease by vaccines.
ELK CAGERS TO
PLAY RONDA HERE
Turn to Basketball as Foot
ball Season Comes to End
Wednesday
GIRLS AND BOYS' GAMES
With the football team all
through with gridiron warfare un
til next fall, following their game
here with Lansing Wednesday
afternoon, athletics at Elkin high
school features basketball with
the announcement Wednesday of
games with Ronda next Tuesday
evening at the gymnasium.
Both the boys' and girls' team
will play Tuesday evening. Ronda
is said to have exceptionally good
teams this year, having already
whipped Roaring River in both
the boys' and girls' divisions, and
real games are anticipated here.
In the game here with Lansing
Wednesday afternoon, the out
come of which was not known be
fore The Tribune press dealine,
the Elks turned in their equip
ment for another season. Last Fri
day, playing Hanes Hi, at Wins
ton-Salem, they were nosed out
by a 7-6 score.
Wednesday's ' football game
marked homecoming for old grads
of Elkin Hi.
WEST YADKIN P.-T. A.
HOLDS FIRST MEETING
About 200 people were present
Tuesday evening, November 16,
at the first meeting of the West
Yadkin Parent-Teacher associa
tion, which featured election of
officers ahd the presentation of
two short plays by the 10th and
11th grades respectively.
Officers elected for the new
year: were: Mrs. Fred Brannon,
president; Miss Ella Shermer,
vice-president, and W. A. Hunt,
secretary-treasurer.
"Be Home by Midnight," the
play presented by the 10th grade,
contained the following cast: Wil
liam Myers, Mildred Garner, Ray
Ireland, Mary Esther Totten and
Zeno Proctor. The 11th grade
play, entitled "The Boar of a
Twist," was presented by the fol
lowing students: Bill Johnson,
Georgia Key, N B. Casstevens,
Eliliu Sloan, PeaKl, Steelinan, Bu
ford Steelman and Elizabeth
Hudspeth.
Elkin
Gateway to Roaring Gap
and the Blue Ridge
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
SENATE FARM BILL
SLOWED BY HIGHER
COST ESTIMATES
McNary Asserts Measure May
Cost Billion a Year
COMPULSION IS FEATURE
It is Believed Measure is
More Thorough Regiment
ation Than Old AAA
PAY NO HEED TO COURT
Washington, Nov. 23. Devot
ing just a modicum of thought to
the probable attitude of the Su
preme court, first the senate com
mittee on agriculture, as exempli
fied in the farm bill taken under
consideration today, and the
house committee, under an agree
ment arrived at this afternoon, ac
cepted without reservation the
compulsory principle in future
crop production control activities.
The new scheme has teeth. No
big, bad wolf, in point of fact,
ever had longer or sharper fangs,
and if the work of the commit
tees is finally given house and
senate sanction the farm popula
tion will be regulated and regi
mented even more thoroughly
than was the case under the old
invalidated AAA.
The senate decided to slow down
on the control bill today after
hearing Senator McNary, Repub
lican, Oregon, declare that it
might cost the treasury a billion
dollars a year.
This would mean that the pro
posal to control surpluses by an
ever-normal granary, subsidies
and other devices would cost twice
as much as the present system of
paying farmers for "soil conser
vation."
Many members will doubtless
ring the changes on such charges
In the days ahead, but advocates
of the program as agreed upon
by the committees making the
point, in the first place, that the
majority of the farmers appar
ently favor the compulsory as
against voluntary methods of
control, and in the second place
there is the question of financing
the farm aid program in the fu
ture. The President has said that
additional funds, if needed, must
be provided in the pending act,
while Secretary Wallace express
ed a preference for processing
taxes.
FOUR HURT IN
AUTO ACCIDENT
Car of Thurmond Family
Crashes Into Embankment;
Blame Steering Gear
3 SUFFER FRACTURES
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Nor
man and two small daughters,
Carol and Doris, of Thurmond,
were injured in an automobile ac
cident between Independence and
Wytheville, Va., late last Thurs
day when their automobile ran
off the road and crashed into an
embankment.
Norman and the younger child
of the two, Doris, two years old,
sustained fractures of the skull.
Mrs. Norman suffered a broken
arm and the older child, Carol,
four, sustained lacerations of the
face. A defective steering gear is
thought to have been the cause
of the accident.
They were brought to the local
hospital for treatment and all but
the younger child have been dis
missed. Her condition is not re
garded as extremely serious.
ABOUT LIFE,THE LESS YOU
KNOW WHAT TO
    

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