North Carolina Newspapers

    In North Oufolin®^
VOL. No. XXVIL No. 4
FLOYD A. BRENDLE,
PROMINENT ELKIN
MAN, PASSES AWAY
Death Comes After Illness of
Seven Months
WIDELY KNOWN CITIZEN
Stores Here Remain Closed
For One Hour During
Funeral Service
FUNERAL HELD MONDAY
Floyd Arthur Brendle, 85, one
of Elkin's most prominent citizens,
died at his home here early Sun
day morning, following a seven
months serious illness.
Mr. Brendle had been engaged
in the mercantile business here
for 23 years, being the senior
member of the firm of P. A. Bren
dle and Son. He was a member of|
the First Baptist church and wasl
a leader in religious activities.!
For a number of years he had,
served on the board of deacons of (
the church and as church treas
ured He was also a member of the,
Jr. O. U. A. M. and of the Wood
men of the World. He was the son
of the late Mr. and Mrs. James F.
Brendle.
Mr. Brendle was widely known
thoroughout this section and was
esteemed by a host of friends. Of
a quite and uhassuming nature,
he went quitely about his duties
but his opinion was sought and
valued in many affairs. As a mark
of respect to the passing of a man
who had so long been associated
with the town, all business houses
were closed from two until three
o'clock Monday afternoon, during
the hour of the funeral service.
The funeral was held from the
First Baptist church. Rev. Eph
Whlsenhunt, pastor of the church,
assisted by Rev. J. M. Hayes of
Winston-Salem, a former pastor,
conducted the services. Interment
was in Hollywood cemetery.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs.
Flora Campbell _ Brendle, two
daughters, Miss Mattie Brendle
apd Mrs. Wheeler Vestal, and one
Lson, J. David Brendle. Four sis
rters, Mrs. George Chatham, Mrs.
H. D. Woodruff, Mrs. W. N. Min
nt-V Elkin; Mm. Jasper L. Russell
of Greensboro, and two brothers,
W. F. Brendle of Kernersville, and
John Brendle of WinstonSalem.
and several grandchildren also
survive.
Pallbearers were the following
employees of the deceased: C. M.
Byrd, Geo. Walters, Conrad Hock,
Irk Greenwood, Vick Weather
man, Clyde Jennings, H. L. Arn
old and Nick Teague.
A beautiful floral offering and
the messages of condolence re
cleved by the family bore testi
mony of the popularity of the de-
S. G. HOLCOMB
HURT IN FALL
Sant G. Holcomb, of Jonesville
and Elkin. was dismissed from
Hugh Chatham hospital Wednes
day following treatment for two
broken ribs And a bruised chest
which he suffered Saturday night
in an accidental fall of five feet,
which occurred in his barn.
He was said to have been at
tempting to catch a chicken when
the fall occurred. ,
ILLUSTRATED TALK TO
BE GIVEN SUNDAY P. M.
An Illustrated lecture on "How
We Got Our Bible" will be given
at the evening service at 7:30
Sunday at the Methodist church
by the pastor, Dr. Wm. A. Jen
kins. Approximately eighty slides
will be shown in the lecture.
A cordial Invitation is extended
the public to attend.
Organization Is
To Aid Needy
Here Christmas
Baskets will not be distribut
ed this year to needy families
by the Associated Charities,
however needy families in this
locality will be aided by the as-
BOfiftilfltl.
The Associated Charities is
cooperating with the Parent-
Teacher Association and other
J organisations in feeding nour
ishing lunches to underprivi
leged children each school day
at the grammar school build
ing.
Any Individual or organisa
tion who desires to aid a needy
family during the holidays Is
requested to contact the in
vestigating committee of the
Associated Charities In order
that all who need aid may re
ceive it and that there will be
Yio duplications of donations.
JL JL JL JL-i .„1 , j li JL JL JL Jm*. sJL
Mountain Buries City's Street
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f &S-: :; "'^djpBB
Here's a worm'*-eye view, of an avalanche In the making. Lowering
Mmwif Into a huge fissure at the top of the "moving mountain" In
Los Angeles' Elyaian Park, a flnr I**! 1 **! cameraman shows how the ever
widening crack is being checked hourly to determine course and ex
tent of the next in a series of huge earth-slides that have already
sent millions of tons of rock, earth and trees tumbling 350 feet into
Riverside Drive, Dayton Avenue, below, and even into the dry bed of
the Loo Angeles river, 1,000 feet away.
Former Employees
Must Register for
Compensation
J. R. Simmons, manager of
the North Carolina State Em
ployment Service for Surry
county, will be here Thursday
and Friday, December 16 and
17, to register persons who have
been laid off from work In var
ious Elkin Industries.
Each former employee must
register to receive unemploy
ment compensation. Mr. Sim
mon's office, while here, will be
on the first floor of the Green
wood building on West Market
street.
ALL IS READY FOR
HOMETALENTSHOW
"Hometown Jamboree" to Be
Presented at Lyric The
atre Friday Night
MANY ACTS ARE ON TAP
"Hometown Jamboree," to be
presented under th£ direction of
Alan Browning, Jr., and featuring
some of the best talent of Elkin
and Jonesville, will be staged at
the Lyric theatre here Friday
night Immediately following the
screening of "Exclusive," an ex
cellent movie starring Fred Mac-
Murray, Frances Farmer and
Charlie Ruggles. The doors will
open around 7:00 p. m. and the
movie will begin at 7:30.
"Hometown Jamboree" will fea
ture wide variety in one hour of
music, dancing and fun. Old fa
vorites will be in the cast as well
as quite a bit of new talent.
Among the popular local enter
tainers will be Byron Bryan, to
new and crazier comedy acts;
Leon Martin, tenor, who despite
an injured foot, will sing popular
songs and may spring a surprise;
Miss Edna Billings, who will ap
pear for the first time as a so
loist and Miss Virginia Lineberry,
who sang herself into a radio
broadcast over WAIR, Winston-
Salem, in a recent amateur show.
Among the new talent to be
presented will be Oene Hall, who
will sing in public for the first
time in his life; Mrs. Sam Mar
shall, talented singer and soloist;
Mrs. Alan Browning, Jr., as the
feminine half of a comedy duet
with Byron Bryan, and the recent
ly organized high school glee club,
under the direction of Mrs. J.
Henry Beeson, which wil be mak
ing its first public appearance.
A highlight of the show will be
"he presentation in person of
"The Wild Man and his Wife from
Borneo" to an original skit de
picting the capture of these sav
age creatures from a village of
Borneo head hunters and showing
'he fate of Sir Anthony Beetle -
TOSS, noted explorer and scientist
it their hands.
Through the courtesy of Sher
man Newman a loud speaker sys
tem will be used. Proceeds of the
•how will go to the Elkin high
chool athletic fund. Alan Brown
ng, jr., will act as master of cere
monies.
OLD LANDMARK IS
DESTROYED BY FIRE
Another of the old landmarks
n this section was destroyed Fri
day evening when the 130 year
log structure, known as the
Greenwood home place, was con
sumed by fire. The huge building
vas located about two miles east
r\t tniHti
JURORS DRAWN BY
COMMISSIONERS
Next Term of Court to Con
vene January 10 Before
Judge Hoyle Sink ,
CRIMINAL AND CIVIL
Jurors who will serve during
the next term of Surry Superior
Court, which gets under way at
Dobson January 10 before Judge
Hoyle Sink, were drawn by the
county commissioners Monday.
The approaching term will be for
the trial of both criminal and
civil cases and will continue for
two weeks.
Those drawn for jury duty
were as follows:
First week: L. M. Cockerham,
G. E. Martin, D. W. Key, C. O.
Booker, Fred C. Norman, C. B.
Snow, G. W. Gentry, R. F. Sum
ner, E. Q. Benbow, G. C. Hauser,
L. E. Cockerham, W. A. Terry, W.
L. Walters, Rufus Moseley, F. M.
Norman, Otis E.. Goad. W. ■ L.
Dunman, Ernest C. Collins, E. W.
Chilton, R. W. Stone, J. S. Mc-
Millan, G. W. Wilcoxen, Eli Col
lins. Roy Hutchins, S. K. Myers,
O. C. Nance, C. W. Welch, H. V.
Allred, W. W. Byrd, Harrison
Golden, W. J. Harman.
Second week: Noah Darnell,
Lester Haynes, C. C. Thompson,
W. S. Sparger, C. N. Glass, Steve
Jarvis, Lee F. Cook, A. W. Key,
H. M. Foy, Jasper Key, Bryant
Creed, W. C. Cox, J. L. Brown,
W. A. Pratt, Talmadge Dockery,
Walter F. Draughn, C. C. White,
E. C. Dezern, K. W. Steel, C. W.
Mayberry, L. G. Willard, Will D.
Merrltt, Jasper A. Brendle.
GUY GOLDEN IS
KILLED BY AUTO
Former Elkin Man Sustains
Fatal Injuries in Accident
Near Statesville
RITES HELD TUESDAY
Guy Golden, 45, foreman of the
Phoenix mills at Statesville, died
Sunday night in a Statesville
hospital of injuries sustained
when he was struck by an auto
mobile Sunday afternoon on the
Taylorsville-Statesville road, near
Statesville. A car, driven by
Joseph Haire, skidded on the
slick pavement during the rain,
the rear of the car stricklng Mr.
Golden and carrying him some
distance before the wheels passed
over his body. Mr. Haire said that
he was crowded off of the pave
ment by a passing motorist and
did not see Golden, who was
standing on the, shoulder of the
rOad, until his car skidded, re
versed ends and landed in a ditch.
Mr. Golden sustained a fract
ured skull and both legs were
broken.
The deceased was a native of
Elkin and was the son of the late
Mr. and Mrs. Ved Golden. His wife
died in 1030. The only immediate
survivor is one sister, Mrs. Nancy
Deßorde of this city. He was a
member of the Chatham Heights
Baptist church in Winston-Salem.
Funeral services were held Tues
day afternoon at 2:30 from Elkin
Valley Baotlst church. The rites
were in charge of Rev. R. B.
Adams, pastor of the church, as
sisted by Rev. James Murray and
Rev. Mr. Ward of Mount Airy.
Interment was in the church cem
etery.
Officers are investigating the
case. In the meantime Haire 1b
being held on a SI,OOO bond.
fiLKIN. N. C„ THURSDAY. DECEMBER 9, 1937
IATENEWC
from the
State and Nation
I FINLAND TO
MAKE PAYMENT
Washington, Dec. 7. Fin
land took steps today to pre
serve its record for prompt
payment of its war debt to the
United States, notifying this
government it would meet this
December 15 installment of
$232,143 when due.
One of 13 war debtor nations
which together will owe $1,680,-
170.447 this month, Finland
alone has not defaulted in the
past.
NEW ANTISEPTIC
DERIVED FROM WEED
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 7. Dr.
J. B. Burt, chairman of the
Nebraska university pharmacy
department, announced today
the discovery of a new antisep
tic derived from a weed so low
ly western Nebraska farmers do
not deign to name it.
The new drug is chlormercuri
carvacrol, which Dr. Burt said
gives great promise as a possi
ble treatment for such skin
diseases as athlete's foot, ring
worm, psoriasis and impetigo.
TEACHING STAFF
SETS STATE RECORD
, Raleigh, Dec. 7. North
Carolina now has 29,900 public
school teachers, the most ever
allotted by the school commis
sion.
Lloyd Griffin, secretary, said
today he thought all allocations
had been completed.
There were 23,322 teachers
allotted by the commission its
first year of operation, 1933-34,
and there were 23,763 last
year.
Increased high school enroll
ment demanded the enlarged
teaching staff, Griffin said.
LATE ANDREW MELLON
WINS TAX CASE
Washington, Dec. 7. An?
drew W. Mellon won today,
three months after his death
formal exoneration of income
tax fraud.
The United States board of
tax appeals threw out the gov
ernment's fraud charge unani
mously and In a divided opin
ion on other issues slashed tfte
government's claim for addi
tional taxes on Melkm's 1931
income from $3,075,103 to
about $700,000. The 125-page
decision was so compiicalted,
however, that it may be sever
al days before the exact amount
is determined. It took the board
a year to make the decision.
WOODROW HOLCOMB IS
HURT IN COLLISIION
Woodrow Holcomb, of Jones
ville, sustained a sprained back in
an automobile accident which oc
curred Saturday night about
11:30 o'clock. He was given first
aid treatment at the local hos
pital. . . .
ELKIN BOWLING TEAM
DEFEATS STATESVILLE
The Elkin bowling team made
up of Hall, Windsor, Byrd, Fulp
and Harris Tuesday night de
feated a Statesville team here by
the score of 2,685 to 2,639. Fulp
was high scorer for Elkin.
Set Rabbit Gum In Drug
Store And Catch Rabbit
It used to be news when a man
bit a dog, but with times like they
are a man is now justified In bit
ing anything he can get hold of.
However, it is news when folks
get to setting old fashioned rabbit
gums in an up-to-date drug store,
and more newsy than ever when
a half grown old field rabbit winds
up in the trap the very next morn
ing.
That's wh*t happened at Turn
er Drug Co., here Wednesday
morning, and if you want proof
there's plenty of witnesses, includ
ing this writer.
Over a week ago Hugh Royall.
local insurance man, presented his
brother, George Royall, owner
and manager of Turner Drug Co.,
with a rabbit. Mr. Royall accepted
the wild bunny and put him In a
sack in the rear of the drug store.
Shortly thereafter the rabbit
got loose and eluded capture, con
CROP CONTROL
BATTLE FAVORS
ADMINISTRATION
McNary's Three-Year Limi
tation on Measure Beaten
FACES TEST IN SENATE
Senator Johnson Enters De
bate to Attack '
"Ever-Normal" Granary
COOPERATION IS SEEN
Washington, Dec. 7. Deter
mined senate and house leader
ship turned the legislative tide,
temporarily at least, in favor of
the administration farm bill to
day.
By a vote of 51 to 25, the sen
te rejected an amendment by Re
publican Leader McNary, of Ore
gon, to limit operation of the bill
to three years. Friends of the crop
control measure called this the
first test of senate sentiment on
the number l item of President
Roosevelt's special session pro
gram.
Foes of the legislation had gain
ed an initial advantage yesterday
in the house, when that chamber
voted 85 to 76 to discard compul
sory control of wheat marketing.
Another senate test was in the
making, and senators urging that
the bill be sent back to the agri
culture committee for re-drafting
expressed confidence that they
could muster more than the 25
votes cast for McNary's idea of
confining the program to the
years 1938, 1939 and 1940. Eleven
Democrats joined the 14 Repub
licans in supporting McNary's
amendment.
The fierce debate that preced
ed the vote . brought Senator
Johnson, Republican, California,
silver-haired veteran of the fa
mous fight against entering the
league of nations, to his feet for
the first time this session.
In a booming voice that belied
effects of his illness last session,
he demanded that "we take time
to determine the wisdom of our
actions," and sided with Me
rry's contention that " the "bill
should be given a limited trial.
HOLD STATE ROAD MAN
FOR ASSAULT HEARING
Gene Chipman, of State Road,
is at liberty under SSOO bond
awaiting trial on December 15
before Justice of the Peace I. A.
Eldridge on a charge of assault
upon Dallas Bauguss, also of State
Road.
According to the arresting of
ficer, both of the men were said
to have been drinking. Bauguss
received a fractured 3kull when
hit over the head with a chair.
He is in the local hospital, where
his condition is said to be satis
factory. •
JUNIOR CLASS IS
TO PRESENT PLAY
A high school play "Let's Get
Together." sponsored by the jun
ior class of the Elkin school, will
be presented in the elementary
school auditorium Friday evening,
December 17.
Two Seniors, five Juniors and
Sonny Brewer, small son of Mr.
and Mrs. C. H. Brewer, constitute
an ail-American family with the
usual family troubles. These fam
ily problems are just about true
in any man's town and for that
reason the play promises to be
highly entertaining-
The list of characters will be
published next week.
cealing himself so well that no one
could find him.
Fearful that the rabbit' would
starve to death in some inacces
sible place, Mr. Royall was care
ful to leave food and water for it
each night. Next day the food
would be missing.
Several times the rabbit -was
seen by store employees, but he
couldn't be caught. Then, the
other night, someone had a bright
idea and the rabbit gum was
brought into play.
The first night the trap remain
ed empty, but Wednesday morn
ing the rabbit was found inside.
He was turned over to Henry
Dillon, of the store personnel, who
took him home and turned him
loose.
- Chances are this bunny will
come hopping In f or a dope (me
of these first days.
Asks Capital's Aid
Political observers saw their pre
dictions of a CIO-New Deal split
come true when John L. Lewis
(above) charred that the admin
istration had lost prestige "be
cause of lack of competent >«ui
coordinated man power." They
were surprised, however, when
A. P. L. leaders publicly joined
with Lewis in calling for united
action by labor and capital to
solve taxation and unemployment
problems.
J. L. DARNEL IS
BADLY SLASHED
Night Policeman Receives
Face Cuts While Attempt
* ing to Make Arrest
ATTACKER IS IN JAIL
J. L. Darnell, Elkin night po
liceman, Is in Hugh Chatham
Hospital suffering severe knife
wounds about the face, and Carl
Prevette, also of Elkin, is in jail
at Dobson awaiting hearing on
charges of assault and battery
with intent to kill, and drunken
ness, as the result of an assault
upon Mr. Darnell Sunday night.
The cutting occurred when
Officer Darnell attempted to ar
rest Prevette in a local cafe. Prev
ette, who at one time was assist
ant night policeman here, was said
to have been drunk and disord
erly in the cafe to the extent of
throwing dishes and otherwise
causing a disturbance, when Mr.
Darnell was called in.
The officer had led Prevette
out of the cafe when the assault
took place. The drunken man was
said to have whipped out a knife,
slashing a deep gash across the
officer's forehead Just above the
eyes, and another across the chin.
The policeman's heavy coat saved
him being cut across the chest,
his clothing having been cut
through.
Blinded by blood from the fore
head wound, the officer attempt
ed to use his blackjack, striking
Prevette several hard blows upon
the head before the man made his
getaway.
Immediately after the attack
the policeman, who had lost a lot
of blood, was rushed to the local
hospital and Chief of Police Dixie
Graham and Deputy Sheriff W. J.
Snow were called. They latter ar
rested Prevette in an alley not far
from the scene of the attack, and
placed him in the local jail.
Advices from the hospital Wed
nesday afternoon were to the ef
fect that Mr. Darnell is making
satisfactory recovery.
LEON MARTIN INJURED
WHEN GUN DISCHARGES
Leon Martin, of Jonesville, an
employee of the Elkin Basketrla
Store, was painfully Injured the
latter part of last week when a
.22 rifle accldenally discharged,
sending the load through his
foot. * j
Mr. Martin had been shooting
rats prior to the accident. The
gun discharged when he stumbled.
The bullet struck just back of one
of the toes, emerging from the
ball of the foot.
As the result of the accident he
will be on crutches for several
weeks.
ELKIN CAGESTERS TO
MEET SPARTA HI HERE
A double-header cage attraction
will be presented for basketball
fans of this section this evening
(Thursday), beginning at 7:30
o'clock when the girls' and boys'
teams of Elkin HI meet teams
from Sparta high school In the
local gymnasium.
Both the girls' and boys'[teams
are said to be showing steady im
provement as the season pro
gresses, and a nip and tuck bat
tle is anticipated with the strong
Sparta aggregations.
The gymnasium will be com
fortably her. ted.
Gateway to Rosrisi? Gm
and the Blue Rids*
PUBHBHBD WEEKLY
JAPANESE ADVANCE
IS NEAR NANKING;
CAPTURE IS NEAR
Military Supplies Destroyed
to Prevent Seizure
TENSION IS INCREASING
Tokio Reported Waiting Word
of Fall of City; May
Mean End of War
CITY EXITS CLOSED
Shanghai, Dec. B.—(Wednes
day)—Chinese troops inside the
barricaded city of Nanking, appar
ently convinced the capital would
fall before the oncoming Japan
ese legions, today began destroy
ing military supplies and equip
ment to keep them from being
taken by the enemy.
Approximately 200,000 Chinese
soldiers were massed In the vicin
ity of Nanking, objective of a
force of 75,000 Japanese, whOM
advance guard was reported at
the city gates attempting to scale
the ancient walls.
Within the capital—deserted by
the Chinese government—tension
Increased as the passing hour*
brought the crisis closer.
Scores of thousands of civilians,
including at last report 17 Ameri
cans and many other foreigners,
massed in the residential area*
which the Japanese said would not
be attacked. All exits were closed.
Japanese officers said the van
guard of the invaders reached the
capital last night immediately
began trying to scale its walls with
ladders after the manner of med
ieval warriors.
They said their main forces were
"progressing satisfactorily and ac
cording to schedule," but had not
yet reached the city.
Artillery jr&s being roHed into
position fof the attack, and the
Japanese sent back word from the
front lastf night that 90 planes
took pare in a bombardment call
ed the mist intensive of the war.
Japan Awaits Capture.
Dispatches from Tokio said the
Japanese capital was in a state of
frcttrsH awaiting the fall of Nan
king. 
DAVIS LEE MARTIN
CLAIMED BY DEATH
Jonesville Man Passes Away
in Veteran's Hospital in
Roanoke Sunday
RITES HELD TUESDAY
Davis Lee Martin, 40, of Jones
ville, son of the late Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Martin, died Sunday
morning at the Veteran's Hospit
al in Roanoke, Va., following a
critical illness of several weeks.
The deceased had been in declin
ing health for Several months.
Prior to his illness he was asso
ciated with the state highway
commission as mechanic for 13
years.
He was a member of the Jones
ville Baptist church and a World
War veteran.
Surviving are four brothers and
two sisters, Evan, Benton and
Lester Martin, of Elkin, and Walt
er Martin, who resides in the
West; Mrs. Pearl Pardue, at
Jonesville and Mrs. Otis Brown,
of Boonville.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday morning from the Jones
ville Baptist church. Rev. D. Ck
Reece and Rev. P. L. Smith con
ducted the services, interment was
In the Jonesville cemetery.
Members of the George Gray
Post of the American Legion were
honorary pallbearers.
OEW6ERSHIPIH |I
NOBILITY OF ||
CHARACTER IS )j)
OPEN TO ALL fI
PEOPLE
    

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