North Carolina Newspapers

    PULLETS SHOULD
PROVIDE PROFITS
Flock of Chickens, if Well
Managed, Should Give Own
er Nice Dividend
FEEDING IS IMPORTANT
Proper management of a flock
of well-matured, production bred
pullets during the winter months
will return owners sizeable profits,
according to C. J. Maupin, ex
tension poultryman at State Col
lege.
Freezing weather has already
been felt over the state, and a
long hard winter is in prospect.
Therefore, Maupin declared, the
good poultryman should be pre
pared to give his birds a chance
to do their best.
Two highly important factors
in winter management are the
kind of feed the laying flock re
ceives and the condition of the
laying house.
A constant supply of drinking
water that is kept above freezing
temperature is almost as import
ant as proper feed, the poultry
specialist pointed out. Then, too,
eggs should be gathered as often
as necessary to prevent their
0 ° 1 ° ■■■■■■■-■b. ■■■ B8
I
We Wish You All A
MERRY CHRISTMAS
And A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Your patronage and friendship during the 0
a past year has been sincerely appreciated.
ELKIN LUMBER & MFG. CO.
"Everything to Build Anything"
THE BEST COAL
Phone 68 Elkin, N. C.
ft—s— ° o SI
Here's Our Wish S
■ CSmas  I
M jjt Ever y Good Thing
IJor ™ I
FIDELITY FINANCE CO. I
AUTO PARTS CO. I
E. Main Street Elkin, N. C. .fig
Free Health
Examination!
- What's wrong with you? Do you really want to
know? Remember, it is your privilege to enjoy
good health—and your mistake If you don't.
Your nerves are your "life-lines?*—when your
nerves are free, you are free—you are well and
happy. Thousands of people suffer and die un
necessarily. Let me show yen why.
Remember we rive no medicine, no drags. We perform BO oper
ation. There la no pain, no ugly incision left to came row trou
ble afterward. Come In for Free Examination.
Reduced Prices Only SI.OO Per Treatment at Our Office
Dr. and Mrs. James Oliver Crutchfield
PALMER GRADUATE CHIROPRACTOR
Office at Joneerille, N. C., Next to Post Office
I Office Honrs Daily Ito 5:30 and.7-8 P. ML
TELEPHONE 860-J
freezing or becoming badly soiled.
Each year during the cold
months, reports are received at
State College on flocks coming in
to production slowly, or of a sud
den slump among many flocks
Chat have been laying fairly well.
Maupin explained that if para
sites or diseases are not present,
the cause of this slow rate of lay
ing is usually due to a lagging ap
petite or to the birds being un
derweight.
In some cases, the birds are
perhaps not getting the proper
amount of grain, and in others,
they are receiving insufficient
mash. The wise poultryman can
usually determine which is out of
balance by handling and observ
ing his birds. ,
DR. JENKINS IS TO
GIVE SPECIAL SERMON
Dr. Wm. A. Jenkins, pastor of
the Methodist church, will preach
a special sermon Sunday at the
11 o'clock hour of worship to col
lege students. The topic of the
sermon will be "Take a Look at
Yourself".
A cordial invitation is extended
the public to attend.
A case of leprosy that developed
43 years after exposure to the dis
ease has been discovered in Scot
land.
THE Er KiN*TRIRimErELKIN t NORTH CAROLINA
REOPEN IREDEL
MURDER MYSTERY
Body of 20-year-old Bride Ex
humed Tuesday Afternoon
By Officers
LEFT FOOT AMPUTATED
Statesville, Dec. 21.—The body
of Mrs. Herman Westmoreland,
20-year-old bride of two months,
whose lifeless body, clad in pa
jamas, was found in a well in tfie
yard of her father-in-law, R. H.
Westmoreland, at Amity Hill, Jan
uary 20, was exhumed this after
noon at the Bethesda Chifrch
cemetery, seven miles east of
Statesville.
The young bride and hef hus
band were making their home
with his father, a widower, in the
Amity Mill community. She dis
appeared on the night of January
19, two months after her mar
riage, leaving her clothing and
personal effects in the bed room.
Her husband was working in a
textile mill in Mooresville and
was not - at home that night.
Searching parties were organized
the next day and late that night
they found the body in the bottom
of a well 35 or 40 feet from the
Westmoreland home. The back of
her head was crushed. One shoe
was off. The shoeless foot was
slightly bruised.
Iredell officers began working
on the solution of the mystery. It
was first thought to be a possible
suicide. But that theory was ex
ploded when no water was found
in her lungs and the fatal wound
was on the back of the head. In
February the coroner's jury found
that she came to her death at the
hands of a person or persons un
known.
Sheriff J. W. Moore, ordered
the body exhumed this afternoon
in the presence of a number of
physicians and officers. The left
foot was amputated and held for
analysis by experts.
DISEASE DRIVE
TO START SOON
Anti-Syphilis Campaign Made
Possible by Z. Smith Rey
nolds Foundation
INCOME FROM $7,000,000
Raleigh, Dec. 20. Dr. Carl V.
| Reynolds, state health officer,
! said tonight an enlarged anti
syphilis campaign made possible
by a gift from the Z. smith Rey
nolds Foundation, probably would
get under way in three months.
The first job of expanding the
campaign, he said, will be to en
gage a qualified personnel to ad
minister antisyphilis treatment.
Until additional persons are em
ployed, the SIOO,OOO already made
available by the foundation will
be used only in existing clinics.
Officers of the foundation an
nounced Saturday the state would
receive the income from
to combat the disease.
Terming the gift a "real trust"
Dr. Reynolds added, "I am not
willing to use any of it, unless I
have a qualified personnel to put
in the field to do the work prop
erly. When I have that, we will
begin."
Governor Hoey said he was
"very much pleased" to hear of
the gift. "The syphilis menace is
a tremendous thing," he said.
"The increased funds ought to go
a long way to get it under con
trol."
WEAVER HAS INTEREST
IN AUTOMOBILE FIRM
Stacey Weaver, of Jonesville,
has acquired a one-third interest
in the Yadkin Auto Sales, local
Dodge-Plymouth dealers here, it
has been announced by officials
of the company. I
Other members of the firm are
L. P. Amburn and J. C. Chappell.
PROGRAM SUNDAY BY
COLLEGE STUDENTS
The annual program presented
by college students of the First
Baptist church will be given Sun
day at the evening hour of wor
ship at 7:30. A number of col
lege students will make brief talks.
A cordial invitation is extended
the public to attend.
Resting Her Face.
Rastus—Dafs better. I don't
like to see yo' all frowned up. But'
does dat smile mean yo' forgives
me?
Mandy—Stay away, man, I'se
just smilin' to rest my face.
The Birth of Christ
The time draws near the birth
of Christ:
The moon is hid; the night is
still:
The Christmas bells from hill to
hill
Answer each other In the mist.
—Tennyson.
Jelly can be made from barber
ries.
, Christmas
I Awakening
TITH Christmas drawing
VA/ near, why can't we get
» * together and make
plans—" Robert Dutton read no
further. With calm deliberation, he
put the heavily scrawled letter back
into its envelope. /
"Always the impractical Hal," he
said slowly. "No wonder he never
gets anywhere."
A list of appointments waited up
on . his desk. Visits from two of
the most important men in town;
a delegation about a right-of-way
through a tract of land he had just
purchased; a reminder of a talk he
had promised to make at a lunch
eon. Important things, he thought,
things Hal would never be called
upon to do.
Hastily he went through his maiL
A square envelope in a familiar
hand caught his eye. He opened it
a little curiously. What could Miss
Denby be writing him about? His
long fingers drew out an artistic
Christmas card. A conservative
wish and an old Christmas carol
printed in English letters. That wai
all, except the signature, "Eleanor
Denby."
A flush stained his face, an un
deflnable something sent the blood
singing through his veins. "Elea
nor," he said softly; "a beautiful
name; how queer that I never heard
it before."
Then, as if resenting his weak
ness and sentiment, he dug into his
mail again. But try as he would,
he could not concentrate on the
things that had meant every
thing to him before. Something
had happened to Robert Dutton; a
Christmas greeting from a secre
tary whom he had scarcely noticed
left him visibly unsettled.
Christmas memories surged
through his heart. He was back in
the old home again. Everybody wds
rushing around in circles. He saw
the big tree in the corner of the
parlor; the kitchen table piled high
with good things to eat. And Moth
er and Dad, with happiness beam
ing upon their faces.
He picked up Hal's letter again.
After all, maybe his kid brother
wasn't so crazy? The thought was
pushing through his mind that may
be it was he who lacked real sense.
"We're Going to Forget Business
for Today," He Said.
This time he read the letter in a
different mood. "Let's give Dad and
Mother the surprise of their lives.
Let's go down and make one grand
Christmas for them. You can turn
everything over to someone else for
a week—anyone can handle things
like that—there's nothing personal
or precious about them."
"Nothing personal or precious
about them I" He turned the words
over in his mind. Hal was right.
Someone else could handle the
things that had seemed so terribly
important. A few hours of confu
sion, perhaps; then things would go
on as before. The world would for
get him in a day.
His fingers reached for the pen
upon his desk. "Dear Hal," he
began, "I heartily agree with your
proposal that we get together and
make plans to give Dad and Mother
the biggest surprise and the grand
est Christmas ever—" He was smil
ing broadly, almost laughing aloud,
as he finished the letter with a
flourish.
Five minutes later Miss Denby
entered Jttis private office to find a
new Robert Dutton. She almost
dropped her book in surprise at
the expression upon his face, and
the new way in which he greeted
her. /
"I'm ready to- begin, Mr. Dut
ton," she began nervously, when he
made no motion to start the routine
of the day.
"We're going to forget business
tor today, Miss Denby, and go
Christmas shopping, that is, if you
want to help me out." „ He fumbled
with his tie as he spoke, noticing
(or the first time the soft curving
of her white neck. "Your Christ
mas card," he went on "wrought
some miracle. I've found out that
justness and making money isn't
iverything in life. They're both fine
n their way, but there are other
hings, too; precious things that I've
.een overlooking." He came closer
o her side and looked hatd into her
yes. "For instance, going shop*
ng with a good-looking and ador
ble secretary."
£ Western Newspaper Union.
SB&
Funeral Services for Mrs. Tom
Whitaker to Be This
Afternoon at 2 o'Clock
HAD LINGERING ILLNESS
Mrs. Plutina Whitaker, 80, of
Burch, died in the local hospital
Wednesday morning from a lin
gering serious illness. The de
ceased was the daughter of the
late Mr. and Mrs. Ben Williams
and the widow of Tom Whitaker.
She is survived by the following
children, James E. and U. C.
Whitaker and Mrs. Charlie Ash
burn, of Elkin; Mrs. John Wil
liams and E. A. Whitaker, of
Rusk: and Mrs. B. W. Key of Ga
lax, , Virginia. One sister, Mrs. Nat
Ashburn, of Winston-Salem, also
survives.
Funeral services will be held
this afternoon at 2 o'clock from
Little Richmond Baptist church.
The rites will be in charge of Rev.
Everette Draughan.
PROMINENT SURRY
WOMAN IS TAKEN
Mrs. Alice Jane Hampton
Dies Tuesday Following
Lengthy Illness
FUNERAL RITES TODAY
Mrs. Alice Jane Hampton, 75,
widow of Dr. Ed Hampton, and
•member of a prominent Yadkin
county family, died at her home
near Friendship church in this
county late Tuesday night, fol
lowing a lengthy illness from a
complication of diseases. Her hus
band, a well known doctor in this
section, died in January, 1918.
She is survived by ten children,
H. C. and Vernon Hampton, Elk
in; E. T. and W. B. Hampton of
California; Mrs. S. W. Emory and
Miss Minnie Hampton, Charlotte;
Miss Ola Hampton, Raleigh; Mrs.
D. W. Whitaker, Greensboro; Mrs.
A. D. Wellborn, State Road, and
Mrs. G- H. Payne, Mount Airy.
One sister, Mrs. Lillie Felts of
Cycle, also survives.
Funeral rites will be held this
morning at 10 o'clock from
Friendship church, in charge of
Rev. T. S. Draughan. Interment
will be in the family cemetery
near the Aome.
Correction
Due to an error which was
later caught and corrected, a
few of the first copies of last
week's edition of The Tribune
stated thp* the Eagle Furniture
Co. would give away SIOO free
on DecemOer 7. This should
have read December 27, which
will be the Monday after Christ
mas.
W To Everybody Everywhere, 8
1 Merry Christmas 1
1 Happy New Year |
iOur thoughts naturally turn at this season of the year &
to the loyalty and friendship of our patrons who have 7g
made 1937 so worthwhile for us. So, in real sincerity, xj
we wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy Nefw |8
Year! V R
J. C. Penney Co., Inc. 1
ELKIN, N. C.
KWCWfWIWWfI
} I
and take/'
yg\
v| I
11 ■
« 2** jp| O - ; jA
) f JB|l^Jj|B§t
H &'JY " c ' .-'.;^p^
Old Santa gives so much and asks so little. Ditto
for the pause that refreshes with ice-cold Coca-Cola.
The handy six-bottle cartons, at your dealer's,
■■l will bring holiday refreshment to your house.
COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
Phone 32 North Wilkesboro, N. C.
TRIBUNE ADVERTISING GETS RESULTS!
-v r .. • . • v.. '
ThurHday. DeeemMr 83, IM7
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view