North Carolina Newspapers

    Thursday, December 23, 1937
bale Carnegie
5-Minute Biographies
Author of "How to Win Friends
and Influence People." xllM
WOODROW WILSON
He Was Faced With One Of The Greatest
Opportunities In History; Yet He Failed
Because He Couldn't Handle People
What kind of man was the real
Woodrow Wilson? He has been
called a supreme genius; he has
also been called a magnificent
failure.
When Woodrow Wilson sailed
for Europe in 1919 he was called
the savior of the ages. Bleeding
Europe hailed him as a god.
Starving peasants burned candles
before his picture and offered up
prayers to him as though he were
1 HERE'S OUR WISH FOR YOU— ®
I MERRY I
I CHRISTMAS! f
1 ' HAPPY NEW YEAR! 1
I SMITHEYS DEPT. STORE I
w ELKIN, N. C. H
Elk Theatre
West Main Street Elkin, N. C.
Thursday, December 23
"ANNAPOLIS SALUTE"
With James Ellison and Marsha Hunt
Floyd Gibbons' "Live Corpse"—News Adm. 10c-25c
Friday-Saturday, Matinee and Night—
GENE AllTßY in
"ROOTIN' TOOTIN' RHYTHM"
Blazing Action with Bullets, Ballots and Ballads!
SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTIONS
Frank Hawks Serial—Andy Clyde Comedy
Mickey Mouse Cartoon
Attend Our Christmas Party and See Your Favorite Star!
SOUVENIRS FOR EVERYBODY!
Regular Admission 10c-25c
« ... » _
Monday-Tuesday—Next Week—
WARNER BAUER JOAN BENNETE
And Walter Wanger's Models, the most photographed girls
in the world, in the most beautiful color picture to date.
Pictorial Review Regular Adm. 10c-25c
Wednesday, Matinee and Night—
Tim McCoy in "Lightning Bill Carson"
Tom Mix Serial Adm. 10c to All
Coming Soon: "Prisoner of Zenda"
a saint. The whole world lay at his
feet. Yet when he returned to this
country three months later, a sick
and broken man, he had alienated
many friends and made a hundred
million enemies.
History presents Woodrow Wil
son as an idealistic school teach
er—cold, dignified, and lack'ng ?n
human warmth. Yet the truth is
almost exactly the opposite. Wil
son was intensely human —hungry
for human relationship—and it
THE ELKIN TRIBUNE, ELKIN NORTH CAROLINA
was the sorrow of his life that bis
own shyness kept him aloof and
apart.
Woodrow Wilson was probably
the most scholarly man who ever;
sat in the White House, yet he,
couldn't read or write until he was
eleven years old. His favorite
reading for relaxation was detect
ive stories. Yet his only evtrava
gance was buying beautiful book, 5 ).
Most of his life he had been
poor His salary as a teacher was
iso f> 1 that his wife painted pic
tures and sold them to help sup
port the family. As a youn* pro
fessor, Woodrow Wilson co ildn't
afford to buy good clothes; and
later in life, like Lincoln, he cared
little about his personal appear
ance.
And like Lincoln, Wilson was in
different to food. He ate whatever
was set before him and often
seemed to be unconscious of what
he was eating. He smoked only
one cigar in his life —or rather, he
did not smoke all of even one. for
he got sick before he finished it.
Under his frozen exterior, Wood
row Wilson was a man of quick
and fierce emotion. Those who
knew him said he had a hotter
temper than Theodore Roosevelt,,
His devotion to his first wife was
intense and pathetic. One of his
first acts after he became Presi
dent, was to buy his wife a set of
sable furs. When she died a year
later he would not permit her
body to be removed from the
White House for seventy-two
hours. He had it laid on sofa, and
for three days and nights he
would not leave her side.
Probably the greatest flaw in
Wilson's character was his lack of
tact. The last years of his life
were a tragic series of broken!
friendships. He quarreled with the
leaders of the Senate. He broke
off with his closest friends such as
Colonel House. Finally, he alienat
ed many of the people of his own
country by asking them to elect
only Democrats to office.
When the Senate refused to ac
cept the League of Nations, Wilson
appealed directly to the people.
His health had always been deli
cate and his physicians warned
him against any additional strain.
But he ignored their advice. Dur
ing the last year of the Presi
dency, this intellectual genius
whose words had once shaken the
world, was now so broken and
weak that he couldn't sign his own
name without someone guiding
his hand.
After his retirement, people
came from all over the world to
his house on S Street in Wash
ington—came to it as though it
were a shrine. And when he lay
dying, pilgrims knelt on the pave
ment before his house and prayed
for the passing of his soul.
Reynolds Tobacco
Company Official
Dies In New York
Winston-Salem,, Dec. 18—Carl
Wainwright Harris, 56, a vice
president and member of the
board of directors of R. J. Reyn
olds Tobacco company, died today
In a New York hospital, according
to word recieved here.
Death followed a shoit illness.
Harris underwent an operation
Wednesday.
Born in Winston-Salem, Octo
ber 22, 1881, Harris was educated
in public schools and became af
filiated with a law firm.
He joined the Reynolds com
pany several years later, working
in the advertising and sales de
partments, and became manager
of the sales department in 1924.
He was elected a vice president
in 1931, having been a member of
the board of directors since 1923.
Funeral services were held Hi
Winston-Salem Monday. The body
arrived there Sunday.
Clyde's Place At
Brooks Crossroads
Destroyed By Fire
Fire of unknown origin de
stroyed the cafe and filling sta
tion known as Clyde's Place at
Brooks Crossroads, early Friday
morning, with a loss of about
$3,000, about one half of which
was covered by insurance. It has
been a popular stopping place for
several months and was owned by
Clyde Prevette, who has operated
it for the past three years.
The building was owned by Mrs.
W. L. Hudspeth and was valued
at $1,200. She had no insurance.
The fire was discovered about 1
o'clock in the morning by a pass
ing truck driver and was beyond
control.
FIVE DIVORCES ARE
GRANTED LAST WEEK
During the term of Yadkin su
perior court which closed Friday
night, over which Judge J. «H.
Clement of Winston-Salem pre
sided, five divorces were granted.
They were as follows:
Edna Caudle Lackey against
Harrel Lackey; Allie Pointer
against William Pointer; Ralph
Kanes against Frances Pauline
Eanes; Leuna Suraci against Joe
Suraci; and Paul Smith against
Susie Pearl Smith.
BETTER HEALTH
By DR. J. ROSSLYN BARP
Director, New Mexioo Bureau of
Public Health
ESSENTIALS OF HEALTH
A writer in the London Times
states, "It is generally agreed now
adays that bodily health depends
on two essential elements —nutrit-
ion and excerise." This ignorant
opinion he describes as a "prin
ciple" and says that it was early
recognized by the British Broad
casting Corporation. So much the
worse for the British radio public.
A sufficient dose of tubercle
bacilli will result in tuberculosis
however well nourished you may
be. Violent excerise and over-fa
tigue are powerful allies of the
disease. Neither nutrition nor ex
ercise can save us from syphilis or
cancer or even a cold in the head.
Neither careful formulas nor much
kicking of his legs will keep your
baby from getting dysentery, al-,
though the dysentery will certain
ly play havoc with his nutrition.
What, then are the essentials of
good health? First I should put
good breeding. No nation that
neglects the problems of inherit
ance will ever attain physical or
intellectual perfection. Secondly I
should place control of our envir
§j MAY EVERY ONE OP YOU HAVE A g
I Merry 1
1 Christmas _ 1
!S? Your patronage and friendship during the past
year has meant much to everyone of us. It is with
ffn this thought in mind that we extend to you every
good wish at this Christmas Season! W
1 Yadkin Auto Sales 1
§ DODGE—PLYMOUTH _ §
S ELKIN, N. C. m
Sf, L. F. Amburn —J. C. Chappell Stacy Weaver ft?
|
Jft* To our many friends and patrons go ®
«$ the combined good wishes of all of W IT IS OUR PERSONAL WISH THAT
S? US for a Merry, Merry Christmas for % THIS CHRISTMAS BE THE
you and yours. May the New Year m W"^
® so fast approaching be filled with ev- » ACT"
TO ery good thing that makes life more m
m enjoyable and may you enjoy good «| FOR YOU!
Si health and happiness throughout $£ „. . , . . , „ ~„ ■
S ? 55 It is impossible for us to greet you all personally, so we
fcu 1938 and many more years to come! gj . , . , ~ . .
flj take this means of expressing our sincere thanks for
4 ¥ Ilk T 4 m your goodness to us during the past year and in wish
-* Jtm, IV **J,X t| Ja m ing you every one the most Joyous of Christmases and
tjjjjj '"T P ITfICI f M 1 ** m the Happiest and most prosperous of New Years!
| llh & rULL lUmrAfti | MR AND MRS. L. F. WALKER.
M Phone 83 Elkin, N. C. S
t „ fgZ' Somers & Co.
onment, and this means proper
disposal of sewage, protection of
water supplies, pasteurization of
milk, adequate housing, eliminat
ion of disease carriers in the ani
mal world such as rats, flies, and
mosquitoes. All of these are funct
ions of government and for this
reason it is dangerous to mislead
a democracy into believing it can
achieve health by physical Jerks
and the drinking of milk. We shall
admit, of course, that good food
and recreation have their place.
And so also have fresh air, and
sleep, and equanimity.
Left No Directions.
Alford (calling up his friend)—
Have you seen the morning papers
with the account of the accident
and my death?
Jeffery—Yes, I was sorry to
read about that. But where are
you speaking from now?
I
A COMPLETE COURSE IN
BEAUTY CULTURE
For Only $50.00
Instructress a college graduate
' with eight years experience in
Beauty Culture. Write for
particulars.
Mae's School of
Beauty Culture
North Wilkeaboro, N. C.
Phone 189
Mrs. Jake Church, Proprietress
1 Christmas 1
(| Greetings 1
££ Your patronage during the past year
I*? has made it very happy for us. May Era
you enjoy a very Merry Christmas and ftS?
*¥ a Prosperous and Happy New Year. ®
I IDEAL BEAUTY SHOPPE 1
ELKIN, N. C. gg
i
I
MERRY I
CHRISTMAS! I
We pause at this glad season of the ra
year to wish one and all a most Joyous
Christmas and a New Year chock full ®
of the good things of life. raj
IYour friendship and good will during
the year now rapidly drawing to a close "3
has meant much to us, and we wish to
express our sincere appreciation. iW
Again—Merry Christmas! ffa
Harris Electric Co. 1
ELKIN, N. C. f£
    

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