North Carolina Newspapers

    Elkin
"The Best Little Town
in North Carolina"
VOL. No. XXIX. No. 49
LATE •
NEWS £
and
BRIEF T
STATE
THREE North Carolina Dem
ocrats, Thurmond Chatham,
of Winston-Salem; W. B. Ki
lt er, of Reidsvilte, and Miss
Carrie McLean, of Charlotte,
Tuesday night authorized pub
lication of statements pledging
their support to Wendell Will
kie under the banner of Dem
ocrats-for-Willkie movement,
according to J. Paul Leonard,
secretary of state headquar
ters. Mr. Chatham, who is
president of the Chatham
Manufacturing company and a
member of the state board of
conservation and development
issued a significant statement,
which read in part as follows:
"I think Wendell Willkie is
best equipped to lead us thru
the present world crisis, knows
more about sound business A.
B. C.'s, and that his practical
experience will mean more
jobs in private industry, more
stable farm prices and more
production in America."
NATIONAL
NEW YORK, Oct. 15.
Among the 1,107,000 New York
men who will register tomor
row In the nation's first peace
time conscription is Francis
Warren Pershing, only son of
Gen. John J. Pershing, who
commanded the A.E.F. in the
world war. Young Pershing,
who is 31, said he was willing
to do anything including
kitchen police—if and when
he is called for duty. "There's
no reason in the world why I
shouldn't be called up," he
said. "And there certainly is
no reason for me to get a good
job out of it."
WASHINGTON, Oct. 15.
The possibility of further aid
to Great Britain or other pow
ers arose tonight when Presi
dent Roosevelt set up an
agency to requisition a large
supply of war materials now
tied up by legal complications.
Any of these supplies which
are not needed for United
States defense may be sold to
friendly powers, the President
said. There were indications
that some machine tools, in
cluded in the materials in
question, might be released to
soviet Russia, which is now
displaying irritation with Hit
ler's incursions into Rumania.
INTERNATIONAL
LONDON, Oct. 15—A two
hour rain of bombs which
turned a German synthetic oil
plant at Politz, near Stettin,
into a giant blowtorch was
described today by British' av
iators returning from a series
of night attacks on Germany.
Oil storage plants at Magde
burg, Bohlen and Hanover also
were pounded according to
Britain's "master plan" for
systematic destruction of Ger
many's chief oil centers, the
air ministry reported, and
Berlin was subjected to an
hour and a half of bombing.
The raid on Politz produced
an inferno, returning fliers re
ported, with giant chimney
stacks toppling, flames sweep
ing a mile square area, smoke
streaking for six miles over the
horizon, and blazing oil tanks
setting a glare which fliers
said must have been seen in
Berlin, 85 miles to the south
west.
MOSCOW, Oct. 15—Soviet
Russia disclosed today that
/ Germany did not tell her in
advance of plans to send
troops to Rumania or even
why such forces were sent to
the nazi-domlnated kingdom
on Russia's border. The Rus
sians employed a familiar form
to indicate their official re
action to Germany's thrust
through the Balkans to the
Black Sea. Tass, the official
Russian news agency, publish
ed a denial of a report carried
by a Danish newspaper, Politi
ken, that the soviet govern
ment was "timely informed
that German troops would be
sent to Rumania and that the
Kremlin was Informed of the
aims and number of troops
sent to Rumania." "Tass is
> authorized to state that this
report • • • does not corre
spond to the facts."
THE ELKIN TRIBUNE
IN BLACK AND WHITE
,M LGT -S SEE NOW!
S* YOU MAY TELL UNCLE GO ANVTIMC S)X W|FE HER [WE'RE NOT INTERESTED
SAM HE CAN HAVE HIM Y X JOF MOTHER, AUNT LUCV, COUSIN IN YOUR DEPENDENTS
AT ONCE! I'VE SUPPORTED L JK* MY TIM, WHO AINT WORKING, AND NOW. THATU COME
\TH BANK AND FINANCE CO. IF YOU'RE
ELKS WIN GAME
HERE 19 TO 7
Team Is Preparing for Final
Home Game With Madi
son High School
AT ATHLETIC FIELD
With the scalp of Cramerton
Hi tucked safely away under
their belt by a score of 19 to 7,
the Elks of Elkin high school are
preparing to meet Madison high
school here Friday in their final
home game.
Playing on fairly even terms
during the first quarter, the Elks
opened up in the second quarter
to score when Shugart carried
the ball over from the seven-yard
line after it had been put in scor
ing position by Sparks.
The second score came in the
third period when Shugart again
scored on a wide end run.
The final touchdown of the
game came in the fourth period
after Cramerton had put over a
score in the third period. The
ball was carried over by Colhard
after an off center smash from
the four-yard line.
REA PLANS SERIES
OF THREE MEETINGS
A series of three meetings is
planned by the REA for next
week, it was anounced Wednes
day by the Dobson office. The
first of the meetings will be held
on Monday, October 21, at West
field at 7:30 in the evening, and
the next meeting will be on Oc
tober 22, at 7:30 in the evening at
East Bend. The last meeting will
be on Wednesday, October 23, at
2 o'clock in the afternoon at
Dobson. All prospective custom
ers to be served by the electric
lines now being erected through
out this section are urged to at
tend, as it is hoped to get wiring
contracts signed at these meet
ings. Two representatives from
the REA in Washington will be
present at the meetings to ex
plain the details of the project.
Approximately S2OO in electric
appliances will be given away ab
solutely free at the meetings and
the major free prize offered is a
wiring job in the amount of
S3O.
BAPTIST SERVICES
ANNOUNCED HERE
Sunday at the morning hour of
worship at the First Baptist
church at 11 o'clock the pastor,
Rev. Stephen Morrisett, will use
as his sermon subject, "Be Still
and Know That I Am Ood," and
at the evening service at 7:30 the
sermon subject -will be "What Is
the Kingdom of God?"
The church extends a cordial
invitation to the public to at
tend the regular worship periods
and the church school at 9:45 on
Sunday morning.
Mexico In Deal With
Japs As "Oil Lands"
Concession Granted
One Spokesman States He Does Not Believe the Prime In
terest of the Concessionaries Is Oil; Diplomatic and
Foreign Business Quarters Greatly In
terested in Disclosure of Agreement
Mexico City, Oct. 16. —Mexico
has granted to a Japanese-con
trolled company a huge "explora
tory oil land" concession on the
Guilf of Mexico, 425 miles from
the Texas border and 1,300 air
line miles from the Atlantic en
trance to the Panama Caqpl, and
is considering the sale to Japan
of 20,000 tons of scrap metal, now
embargoed by the United States,
it was disclosed today.
Diplomatic and foreign busi
ness quarters were greatly inter
ested in the disclosure, . partly
because the land is on the Gulf,
from where any eventual oil
would have to be sent through
the Panama Canal to Japan, and
partly because other foreign oil
F.D.R. IN TALK
TO THE NATION
In Early Morning Broadcast
Says Draft Is Answer to
Policy of Force
DEFENSE PREPARATION
Washington, Oct. 16—President
Roosevelt today told the estimat
ed 16,404,000 young men who are
registering for the nation's first
peacetime draft that their cause
is to save democracy and peace
from those "who have dared to
threaten the whole world with
war."
In an unprecedented early
morning radio address—an hour
after registration began the
President said that the program
upon which the nation has em
barked was one "obviously of de
fense preparation and of defen
sive preparation only," but that
"the duty of this day has been
imposed upon us from without."
"Those who have dared to
threaten the whole world with
war—those who have created the
name and deed of total, war—
have imposed upon us and upon
all free peoples the necessity of
preparation for total defense," he
said.
Selective compulsory military
service, he said, in effect, is
America's answer.
"Today's registration for train
ing and service," he said, "is the
keystone in the arch of our na
tional defense . . .
"To the 16,000,000 young men
(Continued on Page Five, Sec. 1)
ELKIN. N. C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER* 17, 1940
interests have explored the con
cession area and decided that, as
regards oil, it was not promising.
"I do not believe the primary
interest of the concessionaries is
oil," an American businessman
commented.
It was made known that the
ministry of economics had signed
an agreement Sept. 13 allowing
the Veracruzana Petroleum Co.,
five-year exploratory rights to a
250,000-acre tract of state land
in Vera Cruz between Japala, the
state capital, and the Gulf coast
village of Misantla.
The Veracruzana Company is
controlled by La Laguna Com
pany, more tlpan 51 per cent, of
the stock in which is Japanese
owned.
AID GIVEN 361
FOLKS IN AREA
Now Receiving Monthly Pay
ments of Old Age and
Survivors Insurance
CHILDREN ARE HELPED
A statement issued today by
Jamfes N. Freeman, manager of
the Winston-Salem office of the
Social Security Board, shows 361
persons in this area are now re
ceiving monthly payments of old
age and survivors insurance. This
figure represents the number of
men, women and children in the
counties of Davie, Forsyth,
Stokes, Surry and Yadkin, who
have been awarded monthly pay
ments of old-age and survivors
insurance during the nine
months since monthly benefits
became payable (January 1,
1940.) Among those listed are
38 widows, 137 children, 162 re
tired wage earners, and 24 wives
of retired wage earners.
The field manager explained
that when a fully insured wage
earner, who is 65 years old or
more, files claim for his month
ly old-age insurance benefits, his
wife may also claim monthly
benefits when she is 65 years old
or more. In addition each of his
children under 16 (18 if In
school) will receive monthly ben
efits—except that the benefits
for the entire family may not be
more than twice the amount of
(Continued on Last Page, Sec. IX
J. W. FREEMAN
DIES THURSDAY
Jonesville Man Passes at His
Home Following Heart
Attack
RITES HELD SATURDAY
James Worth Freeman, 61, of
Jonesville, died at his home early
Thursday morning from a heart
attack. He was a son of the date
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Freeman
and was born in Jonesville July
16, 1879.
Survivors include thirteen chil
dren, as follows: Six sons, Bill,
Carson, James Freeman, of Elk
in; Charlie, Frank and Jack
Freeman, of Jonesville; seven
daughters, Mrs. A. R. Applewhite,
Richmond, Va.; Mrs. Guy Myers
and Mrs. Mick Brown, of Jones
ville; Mrs. Leary Rogers, Arling
ton; Misses Ada, Estelle and
Catherine Freeman, of Jones
ville; four brothers, E. J., John
and Jesse Freeman, of Elkin; Bob
Freeman, of Jonesville; four sis
ters, Mrs. Charlie Sparks, Jones
ville; Mrs. C. W. Swaim and Mrs.
Spurgeon Benton, Danville, HI.;
Mrs. Pete McGlothian, Yakima,
Wash.
Funeral services were held at
Swan Creek Baptist church
where the deceased had been a
member many years, on Saturday
afternoon after the body had lain
in state from 3 to 4 o'clock. Rev.
Rex Windsor, the pastor, and
Rev. J. L. Powers conducted the
services and burial was in the
church graveyard.
DUKE LINEMAN IS
PAINFULLY HURT
L. A. Gibson, 32, of Winston-
Salem, an employee of Duke
Power company, engaged in
erecting a line to the new Chat
ham carbonizing plant here, nar
rowly missed electrocution Tues
day afternoon when he released
a 2,300 voltage live wire from a
pole, believing that the wire was
dead. His body from the waist up
was painfull burned and he suf
fered bruises as he fell from the
pole.
He was rushed to the local hos
pital by ambulance, where he is
resting as comfortably as could
be expected.
CHANGE IN LIBRARY
HOURS ANNOUNCED
Miss Virginia Price, librarian
at the public- ' library here, an
nounces a change in library
hours, effective Monday, October
21. Hours in the morning will be
from 9 until noon and In the af
ternoon from 2 until five o'clock.
MOKE
During the first eight months
of this year, the national income
was $2,400,000,000 more than In
the same period a year ago, esti
mates Secretary of Commerce
Jones.
Nearly A Thousand
Young Men Register
Here Under Draft Act
Cupid Breaks
One-Day Record
In Surry County
Cupid has been busy in Sur
ry county during the past
week, 13 couples (and probably
not a one of them would ad
mit they're unlucky), having
applied for and received mar
riage license at the office of
the register of deeds, at Dob
son.
Ten of the wedding permits
were obtained during one day,
last Saturday, thereby break
ing all records for one day's
issuance, officials said.
Those who obtained license
to wed were:
' Ira Bledsoe to Miss Mary
Atkins, both of Dobson; Oliver
Davis to Miss Treva Corder,
both of Dobson; Walter W.
Reece, Boonville, to Miss
Martha Jones, Dobson; Roy
Richard, Erie, Pa., to Miss
Thelma Comer, Dobson; Har
ry Hill to Miss Maude Gumter,
both of Ararat; J. Walter
Lowery, to Miss Margaret
Louise Coone, both of Ararat;
Novin Dale Horton, Hillsville,
Va., to Miss Freida L. Harmon,
Floyd, Va.; Leonard Hayes to
Miss Odessa Wright, both of
Thomasville; Gordon Proctor,
Rural HaU, to Miss Edith M.
Mills, Ararat; Henry Wagoner,
Wilronghry, Ohio, to Miss
Florence Barber, Geneva,
Ohio; William Roger Taylor
to Miss Patsy Ruth Jones,
both of Mount Airy; Isaac
Lindsay to Gertrude Thomp
son, both of Elkin.
Methodists Hold
Fourth Quarterly
Conference
Rev. Herman P. Duncan, pas
tor of the Methodist church, will
pi each at the Sunday morning
hour of worship at 11 o'clock on
"This I Do Know." At the even
ing service at 7:30 the young
people's choir of the church will
furnish special music. The ser
mon subject has not been an
nounced.
On the evening of October 23,
there will be no mid-week prayer
service due to the fact that the
pastor will be away at the annual
church conference in High Point.
At the fourth quarterly confer
ence meeting held at the church
on Monday evening of this week
by Rev. J. S. Hiatt, of this city,
superintendent of the Elkin dis
trict, new boards and committees
were set up for the work of the
church year. Among the new of
ficers elected were E. S. Spain
hour and Clifton Leary to the
board of stewards of the church.
W. A. Neaves was added to the
board of trustees of the church
and was also reelected as Golden
Cross director.
Miss Dorothy Colhard was
named as president of the young
people's department of the
church and Charles G. Ashby
was reelected as general superin
tendent of the church school.
Mason Lillard was reelected as
district steward and W. S. Reich
was named as lay delegate to the
annual conference in High Point.
Mrs. George Royall was elected
as president of the Woman's So
ciety of Christian Service of the
church and H. B. Holcomb was
reelected as recording steward.
DR. W. P. FEW, DUKE
U. PRESIDENT, DIES
Durham, Oct. 16—Dr. William
Preston Pew, president of Duke
University and its predecessor,
Trinity College, died in the uni
versity hospital at 7 a.m. today
after a brief illness. He was 72.
Death was attributed to a
heart attack which he had suf
fered several days ago. His con
dition had been critical but he
was improving slowly until today
and doctors had believed he
would recover.
Dr. Few became professor of
English at Trinity College in
1896' and has been continuously
in the service of the institution,
which later became Duke Univer
sity, ever since. He was formally
inaugurated president of Trinity
on November 9, 1910.
14 Pages
TWO SECTIONS
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
VOLUNTEERS
AID IN BIG JOB
WEDNESDAY
Many Out-of-County Men Are
Registered
WORK MOVES SMOOTHLY
Chief Registrar Hall Ex
presses Apreciation for
Assistance Given
RUSH IS OVER BY NOON
The nation's young men placed
themselves at their country's call
for military duty Wednesday
morning in the first draft ever
conducted with America at peace.
In Elkin, as in other towns and
cities all over the country, the
registration place at the city hall
opened at 7:00 a.m., and was to
remain open until 9:00 p.m.
Late Wednesday afternoon
Chief Registrar J. L. Hall stated
that approximately 800 men had
registered, with the total figure
expected to reach 900 or a thou
sand by closing time. Of this
number, he estimated 50 or more
were men who do not live in the
county. Approximately 100 col
ored men had been registered, he
said.
The work of registering the
men proceeded at a rapid pace
from the start. Plenty of volun
teers were on hand to aid in the
work of filling out the necessary
forms and pocket cards, and by
afternoon a great majority of the
work had been completed.
Following the end of the reg
istration period, an official count
was to be made and the figure
iJhoned to R. A. Freeman, of
Dobson. a member of the county
draft board- The cards them
selves will be carried to Dobson
this morning. v . .
Each man who was registered,
was given a pocket card contain
ing his name, address and other
information, which he was in
structed to carry on his person
at all times as proof that he has
complied with the selective ser
vice law.
Mr. Hall stated that the task
of registering the men here had
run smoothly and expressed ap
preciation for the generous aid he
has received on the part of the
numerous assistant registrars.
HIGH SCHOOL TO HAVE
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
This year, for the first time,
the high school here will have
student government. Election of
a president, vice-president, secre
tary and treasurer will be made
today (Thursday) by a vote of
the student body.
Candidates for the office of
president are Miss Peggy Royall,
Miss Emma Charles Foster and
Eugene Aldridge; vice-presiden
tial candidates are: Miss Eleanor
Hayes, Bobby Harris, Walter
Gainer and Bill Donovan. Aspir
ants to the office of secretary
are Miss Mable Davis, Miss Jo
Barker, Miss Elizabeth Alexan
der and Windell Martin, and for
the office of treasurer, Worth
Graham, Harold Brendle and Joe
Harris.
Twenty people were killed in
railroad crossing accidents in
North Carolina during the first
four months of 1940.
Registration
Books for
Election Open
Registration books for the
November 5 election are now
open and will remain open un
til Saturday, November 2, in
order that all voters who are
not registered, may do so in
order to vote.
Books will be at the city hall
each Saturday. Those wishing
to register on week days may
do so by seeing Registrar J. L.
Hall at his office in the W. M.
Allen building.
Everyone who is not regis
tered is urged to do so on or
before November 2.
    

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