North Carolina Newspapers

    ■SUCCESSFUL
PARENTHOOD
By MRS. CATHERINE C* EDWAHDS
EDUCATIONAL TOYS ARE
MADE FOR FUN, TOO!
A certain friend of mine can do
nothing well with her hands.
This lack even extends to an au
tomobile —her head and hands
don't work together and her eye
is so poorly trained that she can't
steer straight. Needless to say
she has never learned to drive.
When questioned about her child
hood activities she admitted that
she had done little except play
with dolls and read books. No
little red wagon or tricycle had
taught her to keep wheels in line.
She'd never been on roller or ice
skates to learn to balance her
body. She had never built with
blocks or fitted puzzles together
or modeled with clay or painted
with fine splashy strokes on large
paper. In other words, all dur
ing childhood her hands and legs
and arms were undirected.
Now I've told this story to il
lustrate the need for giving
thought to the selection of your
child's toys. I often think the
term "educational toy" mislead
ing, for parents are apt to imag
ine that children won't have fun
with them. Instead, these toys
are designed, not only to develop
skills, but to draw on the child's
imagination—and that is why
children love them.
For instance, wasn't it more
FROM SPAINHOUR'S
1 That Are Sure To Please
u IE Stationery Any one of these lovely gifts will please her Christmas morning;
\\ H motoc so if you are having trouble deciding, jiAt pay us a visit and let
/ ladistirfctive us you in solving the problem. Here at Spainhour's you'll
I . I Christmas gift. find many other suggestions that will prove ideal for Christmas
& y |l Attractive- eivinc
jjj^ f t pa i c y d for
Mrs '
HSfSO CAN ° fco,ors ' pgo
% r i n IQr 1 pound Mint Juleps 39c *
l*Jl, it/ l/t, / i pound White Xmas box 39c *
1 pound Xmas Tree box 39c C\\an\Wn
3 pounds assorted choco- V/ilCniilC OJjTk^kxlxo
(f Handkerchiefs K a^es » roun( * ti" s sl-00 jvj e w shipment of Chenille
8M„, „ h , 5 pounds assorted choco- spreads just arrived- '
I)s\H Hundreds of lates, round tins $1.98
118| gL,S VMtot69s
' fl £\\ fl \ EARLY AMERICAN
? Inv O /)/) 1) JL II B FRIENDSHIP GARDEN
J WT >pl .UU V 1 \ TOILET LINE
gloves in- attractive styles b^^t" 8 ' gabardines, patent com
.V .
Sydnor-Spainhour
Elkin, N. C.
fun to play house at grand
mother's using broken dishes
found in the hen house than at
home with your beautiful tea set?
The same Is true of any toy
which stimulates the Imagination,
though we don't mean to Imply
that little girls don't love minia
ture tea sets! For children need
both types of toys, those all
ready to be played with and those
out of which they must make
something.
Of course, if you give a ten
year-old a toy designed to develop
the muscles of a five-year-old
and appeal to the young child's
awakening interests he'll natural
ly find it dull. What the toy has
to give will be an old story to
him. Similarly if you give him a
toy meant for a child at his age
level but without his previously
having had the opportunity to
learn from simpler toys to man
age this more complicated de
vice, he will be baffled. So the
rule to follow is to keep the toy
just a little in advance of the
child's present abilities so that it
will draw out new capacities and
interests.
Briefly, the first toys should
help develop the large muscles of
arms, legs and back —blocks to
lift, a variety of things to push
and pull. Learning color, sound
and names of objects is impor
THE ELKIN TRIBUNE, ELKIN, NORTH CAROLINA
tant too. Prom two to four,
things which teach manual dex
terity are needed together - with
more adventurous apparatus for
muscular development, imagina
tive and creative play begin by
the third year so that /materials
for making things, for mas
querading, for dramatizing
household activities help normal
growth. Toys should be durable
to discourage destructive tend
encies. Games and puzzles should
be very simple for the four-year
old and yet still provide mental
exercise.
Your public library, and in
larger cities the toy expert in
the stores are equipped to advise
you on the right toy for your
child. Wise parents will take ad
vantage of these services.
ARLINGTON
The members of the Arlington
W. M. U. met in the home of Mrs.
W. P. Jones and discussed the
topic for the month, "Faithful
Amid Persecutions Europe."
Those taking part on the pro
gram were Mrs. Jim Dunman,
M*s. Earl Rose, Mrs. W. P. Jones,
Mrs. Wayne Stroud and Miss
Omie Wagoner.
The scripture lesson was read
by Perry Holcomb. The hostess
served refreshments during the
social half hour.
The Arlington W. M. U. met at
the church Friday evening, De
cember 7, to study "Publishing
Glad Tidings." Mrs. Carl Rose
was in charge of the study course.
The book was taught by Mrs. W.
P. Jones, Mrs. Odell Holcomb and
Mrs. Johnny Sears.
One pound of tobacco will
make 350 cigarettes.
Read Tribune Advertisements!
Chicogoan
Himself; Walks
Thru Plate
Chicago, Dec. 9. —Fortune in
dulged in some dizzy didoes in
1940.
That became apparent today
when Paul Jones, of the national
saftey council, made public his
all-American selection of the od
dest accidents of the year.
Among the rarest were these:
Joseph Callahan, of Chicago,
had always enjoyed cordial rela
tions with his teeth. But
one day he dozed and slipped
from his chair. His plates land
ed, tooth-side up, on the floor.
Mr. Callahan's head came down
in the same spot. The result
was a vicious bite in the forehead.
Bob Forde, strolling along in
Marysville, Calif., wondered why
two men approaching him were
walking so far apart. He decided
to go between them and . . .
crash! He didn't know until it
was too late that they were car
rying a large sheet of window
glass.
Eugene Ramsey, a carpenter of
Burgaw, N. C., was fashioning a
mouse trap—a better one, of
course. And . . . zing! . . . the
snapper banged shut on his fin
ger. With a howl of pain, he
hurled the contraption under the
kitchen stove. It struck a mouse
and killed it.
A dignified old gentleman was
standing on a saftey island in
Chicago, waiting for a street car.
Suddenly a passing cab swerved
to avoid striking an automobile.
The back door flew open. It
scooped up the prospective trolley
patron and deposited him on the
floor of the taxi.
As Ralph Lyman, of Clarlnda,
la., hurried to answer the tele
phone, he slipped and fell, but
crawled painfully to the phone
and heard the voice on the other
end say: t
"This is Doctor Burnett. Can
you come right over and look at
my furnace? It's broken."
"You better come right over
and look at my leg," replied Ly
man. "It's broken, too."
Policeman: "What are you
standing here for?"
Loafer: "Nothing."
Policeman: "Well, move on!
What If everybody was to stand
here in one place. How would
the others get by?"
To relieve FkO
Misery of V^"JLiJLfO
AAA L,QU,D
TABLETS
nnn * alv *
■■II || COUGH DROPS
NOSE DROPS
Try "Bub-My-Tism"—a Wonder
ful Liniment
FOR STYLE THRILLS! T NEW
Georgians Frocks
j4s Seen in December Vogue
V . EASY GOING
Sy
' - Others $3.98 to $10.95
Made of the exclusive Gloriana
crepe that is as much an achieve
ment in the fabric field as
GEORCIANAS are in the dress
field. The dressmaking details are
rich and the colors sunny enough
for North or South.
B—Tucking pointf C—Decorative leaf
the way to smartnesi. embroidered pockets.
Absinthe, Leaf Rose, Sail Blue, Burmese
Black, Spicy Brown. Amber, Woodmoss.
l6t ° 14Hte24H
My
Prof.: "Will you girls in the
back of the room please stop ex
changing notes?"
Student: "They aren't notes,
sir. They're cards. We're play
ing bridge."
Prof.: "Oh, I beg your pardon."
I -W.l »l JJ By Elk
A i lfc i iii Pharmacy
| (THEM SEEMS no M I—EM WHEN YOU GET (I KNOW rr VMONT!
1A A SLIGHT BOMP .THIS SUIT IT WON'T V THAT'S MY
1 nere is a noticeable difference In price, which is yours to
pocket, on the name-brands of cosmetics and toiletries at the
Elk Pharmacy. Our policy
is to offer you the finest
quality obtainable a t the
fairest of prices.
Thursday.
Mattie Mae Powell
NOTARY PUBLIC
Building A Loan Office
Main Street
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view