North Carolina Newspapers

    Along
the Way
?Emily Klllette
In one of the January,
935, issues of the DUPLIN
IMES, the newspaper was
hiding a hog-killing contest.
Persons who killed hogs
ould come by the paper and
eave the weight of their
leaviest hog, and at the end
if the season, a winner was
licked who had the heaviest
log. The winner's name was
ever printed, at least that 1
Luld find, but that brings us
the dicing art ? hog
ling.
Until recently, with the
iblication of the "Foxfire"
oks done in Georgia, much
the old country way of life
is not considered art. It
is with these books that the
pulation all across the
ited States took a second
k at the South and the
irs of life which had been
gotten by many, and were
er known to others. And
acceptance of the "Fox
" books created a sur
ing interest and growth
he handmade and home
le craft and food worlds.
, one thing which the
ks failed bring back
i the attitude of the
ghborhood families when
entire community worked
helped each other
iugh the good times and
bad times.
mong the forgotten arts
he country is the art of
killing, which can still be
i in Duplin County today,
n though there are hog
ings in Duplin today,
ny are not done as they
e years ago. Many people
re their hogs killed at a
tmercial slaughterhouse
the next day the owner
ts up his hogs and pro
eeeds with the hog killing
from there, cutting up and
cooking the fat for lard,
grinding and stuffing the
sausage, and salting the
meat in the smokehouse.
This way of killing hogs takes
the entire challenge from the
job of butchering the hogs,
removing the hair in the hot
vat, and cleaning tjie
chitlins!
However, both kinds of
hog killings are arts in them
selves which require quite a
bit of knowledge. In past
years, such as 1935, a hog
killing was a neighborhood
event in which all families
participated. But, in 1980,
not many hog-killings are
seen in which the entire
neighborhood willingly joins
in the job and slaughters
about 13 hogs in one day. it's '
sad to think that not many
neighborhoods join in their
neighbors' good times and
bad times with each family
doing all they can and the
best they know how just for
the satisfaction of being a
good neighbor. The quality
of life a person receives from
helping his or her neighbor
' can be felt in every neigh
borhood, and in each home,
making even a visitor aware
of the strong bond of friend
ship the entire neighborhood
shares.
Recently a Cypress Creek
farmer held a hog killing in
which 13 hogs were
slaughtered, and the entire
neighborhood was present.
Together the 25-30 persons
worked steadily and harmo
niously until the end of the
day, when a handshake was
all the pay that was neces
sary before each went home.
Photo by Emily Killette
OLD WEATHER AND HOG KILLINGS Along with cold
lather comes the chore of killing hogs for country folks,
d many of these hog killings are community affairs when
the neighbors come to help. Pictured above is Lloyd
trganus of Cypress Creek at his hog killing, in which 13
A COUNTRY HOG KILLING planing the
hog killing is the job of removing the hog
hair in a scalding vat filled with water and
turpentine which is heated to a very high
temperature-. Pictured is a scalding vat and
Photo bv Emily Killotto
hugs which have been cleaned and ready to
be cut up. During a recent hog killing in
Cypress Creek. 13 hogs were slaughtered, of
which six had been cut up by lunch. The
remaining seven are shown above.
HARD AT WORK - Killing hogs requires
much hard work and everyone works as
quickly as possible in order to finish before
the sun goes down. Some of the jobs include
culling the whole hog into parts as seen in
Photo by Emily Killotto
the picture above. Other jobs include cutting
the fat n> be cooked for lard, grinding and
stuffing sausage, and cleaning chitlins ? all
in a day's work during a Cypress Creek hog
killing.
JSTC Honor List
Jamei Sprunt Technical
College has released the
President's List and Dean's
List for the fall quarter, 1979.
The President's List consists
of those who were enrolled
fulltime and made all A's and
the Dean's List consists of
fulltime students who earned
a B average, with no grade
lower lhan a C.
President's List
Linda Aycock. Annie
Barnhill. William E. Brown,
Gordon Campbell, Ida
Lrumpler. Frank Daniels.
James W. Davis, Warren
Gore. Angela M. Hall. James
M. Hall. Roosevelt Herring.
Sylvia Hotlingsworth. Larrv
Howard. Peggy Jernigan,
Alice B. Jones. Bobby King,
Jeff Lanier. Myra Lanier,
Beth Nicholl, Leigh Page.
Richard Parker. Randy Pas- ,
chal, Iris Raynor, Carl Sand
lin. L aura Smith. , Linda
Stokes. Don Vinyard, Johnny
Wells. Julia Whaley. Louis
White and James A.
Williams.
Dean's List
Dixie Albertson, Elberl
Baker, Julius Bannerman,
Michael Bannerman, Sarah
Barnette. Becky Barnhill,
Russell Barwick. Ray Battle.
Edwina Baits, Nancy Batts,
Volene Bell, Betty Bennett,
Marilyn Benson, Harold
Best. William Best, Debra
Bizzcll, Caswell Ann Blanch
ard, Kimberly Boney, Mara
Boucher. Catherine Brinson.
Brenda Brock, Andy Brog
den, Julie Brogden, Gregory
Brown, Helen Brown. Mar
shall Byrd. Thomas Caglc,
Millie Carr. Terrie Carter,
Lucinda Cavenaugh, Rita
Lynn Cavenaugh, Keith
Chambers, Jeff Conrad,
Alonza Donnell Cooper,
Rebecca Council. Caressa
Creel. Elizabeth Eason.
George Eberhardt, Robert
English. Carolyn Ezzell,
Teresa Fountain. Francis
Frederick, Melody
Frederick, Moses Frederick,
Leslie Fussed, Amanda
Futrell, Wendy Garner.
Geraldine Giddings, Julie
Gideofts, Linda Godbold,
James Goff, Vernell Gore,
Myra Hall, Darlene Hatcher.
Donald Henderson. James R.
Hill, Laura Holden, Curtis
Hooker. James M. Home,
Michele Howard, Timothy
Huffman, Elizabeth Hunter,
Wanda Hunter, Carol Ives,
Alfonza Jeffers, Rhonda
Jenkins, Marianne Jones,
Beverly Judge. Gale Judge.
Alex Kellem. Marvin
Kellem. Frances Kelly, Larry
Kelly, Glenda Kennedy. Roy
Kennedy. Lisa Kornegay,
Joseph Koiara, Tammy
Lane. James Lanier. Teresa
Lasseter Kimberly Marsh
burn. Antiortette Michael,
Annie Miles, David Miller,
Larry Joe Miller, Nella
Moblev. Shirley Mobley,
Abraham Monk, John T.
Montgomery, Ronnie Moore,
Wanda Moore, Claudius
Morrisey. Ranald Mounts.
Jeff Mousmoules, Mignon
ette Mozingo. Beverly Mur
phy. Mamie Murphy, Oscar
Murphy, Ida Murrill. Janine
Navaroli, Ivanhoe. Alice
Newbold, John Norman.
Johnnie Nottingham.
Barbara Outlaw. John Out
law. Roslyn Padgett. Mike
Panno. Donald Parker. Rich
ard Peterson. Joyce Phillips.
Sarah Pickett, Wayne
Powell. Janice Quinn. Jac
queline Ray. James Ronald
Raynor. Lvdia Rector. Terry
Rhodes. Eddie Rivenbark,
Angelo Robinson. Donnell
Robinson. Lillie Robinson.
Angelia Rouse. Ronald San
derson. Ermon Scott. Walter
E. Scott. Walter R. Scott.
Janice Simmons. James O.
Smith. Kimberly Smith. Jan
ice Stallings. Lillie Strick
land. Terri Stroud. Pamela
Tart. Susan Teachey. Tammy
Thigpen. Terri Thigpen,
Jessie Thompson. Shirley
Thornhill Burdette. Gail
Tucker. John Tucker. Laura
Usher, Sylvia Vella. Con
stance Vereen, Glynwood
Wade. William Ward. David
Wells. Joy Whitman. Sylvia
Whitman, Larry Wilkins.
Billy Williams. Greg Wil
liams. Lula Williams. Mar
garet Williams. Kimberly
Williamson. Mona Williford.
Laverne Wilson and Adolph
Zepeda.
CORRECTION
In an article on the new
worthless check law in last
week's Duplin Times. Gary
Grady should have been
identified as the Assistant
District Attorney.
Sale- Sale- Sale
?Hie
/ounVrxj
Beulaville, N.C.
Candles, Baskets, Pewtere, Brass, Armetale, Counted
Cross Stitch, Quilt Kits, Wedding Invitations, Note
Paper, Handpainted and Handcrafted Gifts, Crafts,
Benne Wafers, Joan Walsh Angland, Mrs. Noah, Rod
Farms Studio, Claire Burke PotPourri
Sale- Sale- Sale- Sale- Sale
ftp **
sale
CONTINUATION OF SALE
? Sportswear ^Skirts
?Dresses ?Coats ?Slacks
?Suits Etc.
Many Super Valuesl
1 rack Men's 1 rack Men's
SWEATERS SUITS
Reg. up to $32.50 Reg. up to $135.00
$1000 $3500
THERESA'S
FASHIONS
BEULAVILLE KENANSVILLE
Sale
STILL IN PROGRESS
ALL
VINTER MERCHANDISE
MARKED DOWN
25%/o50 %off
ivings in every deportment
I Store Hours: Monday thru Saturday 9:30 AM-5:30 PM J
leder's Budget Store
104 S. ContorSt. of MOUNT OLIVE Phone 658 2035
I *
|q Approved lodort Choi go Card< I iSil
SHOCKING
BUT TRUE....
THE LAST FEW DAYS OF OUR
BIGGEST SALE OF THE YEAR
HAVE ARRIVED^ SO WE'VE
ADDED ALL
WOOL AND VELVET
BLAZERS
AND SUITS
TO OUR
%
OFF!
LIST
? SPORTSWEAR ? COATS ? SWEATERS
? PANTS ? BLOUSES ? DRESSES
? AND ?
SPECIAL RACKS WITH SPECIAL PRICES
? PARTY DRESSES ? PANTSUITS ? JUMPSUITS
$ 10.00
jEttplfe &tipppe
N. Center St. 658-3118 Mount Olive
FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR PERIOD ENDING
December 31, 1979
Community Mutual Burial Association, Inc.
Warsaw l\l 0
BALANCE DECEMBER 31, 1979 $30,835.86
RECEIPTS:
1. Current Assessments collected $8,027.10
2. Number new members, 61 at $.50 30.50
3. Interest on time deposits, stocks, bonds 1,229.24
4. Miscellaneous
5. Disallowed death claims
6. Total (lines 1 to 5, inc.) $9,286.84
7. Net difference of advance assessments: 243.50
8. Receipts 9,530.34
9. Total receipts 40,366.20
DISBURSEMENTS:
10. Salaries
11. Collection commissions 2,400.00
12. Miscellaneous expenses 335.84
13. Total expenses (lines 10 to 13, inc.) 2,735.84
14. Death benefits paid No. 7 No. $100 700.00
21 No. 200 4,200.00
15. Membership fees paid agents 30.50
16. Refunds
17. Total disbursements (lines 12 to 16, Inc.)
$7,666.34
BALANCE TO BE ACCOUNTED FOR
ASSETS:
18. Cash shortage
19. Cash on hand
20. Bank deposit Branch Bank checking 710.30
East Federal Saving C.D. #6721 26,247.31
21. Securities
22. Securities East Federal Passbook 5,742.25
23 Securities
24. Total assets $32,699.86
LIABILITIES:
25. Advance Assessments $3,206.70
26. Death benefits unpaid 0
27. Expenses unpaid 0
28. Total liabilities $3,206.70
SURPLUS $29,493.16
Number of assessments during the year 12 Race W
Membership in good standing at close of books 2206
I hereby certify that the information given in the
foregoing report is true and correct to the personal
knowledge of the undersianed
SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN TO BEFORE ME, This .
8th day of January, 1980
William G. Britt, Jr.
Notary Public
My commission expires Nov. 24, 1980
Secretary-Treasurer, Mary P. Vernon
Street Address - P.O. Box 492
City - Warsaw, N.C. 28398
Telephone number 293-7575
ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING OF
COMMUNITY MUTUAL BURIAL ASSOCIATION
WILL BE HELD ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1980, AT
5:00 P.M. AT COMMUNITY FUNFRAL HOME.
WARSAW, N.C. MEMBERS AR2: URGED TO
ATTEND.
" S"i
    

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