North Carolina Newspapers

    Beating The Weather At Hog-Killing Time
At hog-killing time a lot depends on the weather and
when it rains action can come to a standstill. One way to
get ahead of the weather is to work indoors. Pictured
above, hog-killing activities continue even though rain
poured outside. Pictured left, Walter Rouse works
i
grinding sausage and, right, Alice Reed cuts lean meat
preparing it for the grinder. Both worked in a
hog-killing held on a farm outside Warsaw by Russell
Killette last week.
V
Attention Area Sculptures
Attention, all sculptors or other
artists with experience in permanent
outdoor projects.
The Senior Citizens Center of
Morgan ton is requesting proposals
for a permanent outdoor work which
I must in some way address itself to
" the following concerns: The piece
must specifically relate to the imme
diate site of the Senior Citizens
Center. The piece must, on some
level, be ihfluenced by, derive
inspiration from, symbolize or other
wise relate to the richness in life
which comes from the passage of
years. The piece must, furthermore,
recognize the contest of the town in
which the Senior Citizens Center is
situated.
Proposals can be in any form
which the artist chooses. They can be
written, maquettes, models, draw
ings, a no more than 10-minute in
length presentation to the Senior
Citizens Sculpture Committee, or a
combination of these.
There is at present no budget
ceiling on this project. Each proposal
will be judged on the basis of its
appropriateness to the above stated
criteria and then weighed against its
prt jected cost.
Each proposal must contain a
realistic budget which will, it
selected, be incorporated into a
contract with the artist.
For obvious reasons, there is some
advantage in keeping costs at a
reasonable and appropriate level.
All proposals should be submitted
no later than 12 noon on March 31,
1985. The Senior Citizens Sculpture
Committee will review the proposals
and respond in writing to each of the
proposing artists within six weeks of
this date.
Applications are available at the
Duplin County Arts Council office in
Kenansville.
' In
6th Annual I |
Sporting ]
Goods
Show *'
There will be EARLY
ORDER BUYS on SOFT- "
BALLS, BATS, GLOVES
AND UNIFORMS.
^ "7,. " H
!?! SoftbanV
IS A * Football 1
ff W ? Baseball
Jan. 36th A 37th
] Sat. 10 til S 12 Til 5
|| Shrine Club
V Old Goldsboro Hotel, comer of Walnut & Center Streets
W Men Leagues, Women Leagues & Youth
League's Managers, Sponsors, Players and
PjJStHS
?WRESTLING 8:15 P.M. &15 P.M. I
I KENAN MEM. AUDITORIUM I
Sponsored By The KenansvUle Jaycees
I GRUDGE MATCH " I
| IVAN KOLOFF |
?VERSUS?
I PON KERNOPLE I
| SPECIAL CHALLENGE MATCH |
I PICK SLATER I
I COWBOY RON BASS I
1 with James J. Dillon
I THE RACIN' BULL I
?VERSUS?
| NIKITA KOLOFF I
i for world's jr. Denny Brown vs I j.j. Dlion vs I
|??AV?jEjOH1^ITLE^Kejt^
t ffjj\ M Coaches are urged to attend.
Jt; - J7 Over 20 Factory Representatives Such As: RUSSELL
^ ATHLETIC ? RAWLINGS - WILSON - DUDLEY -
^ Sf/1 WORTH - BIKE - BETLIN - S&M - EASTON -
iS SPANJAN - POWERS - NEW ERA - And Many
\ Others Will Have Uniforms And Equipment
NEW ITEMS for this coming season will be display.
Sportsman's World Inc.
Kinston Goldsboroand Smithfield-Selma
Businesses Sign Options
On Land For Turkey Plant
Options were signed Friday by
representatives of Carroll's Fooids of
Warsaw and Goldsboro Milling Co.
to purchase 600 acres of land
between Blizzards Crossroads and
Garner's Chapel, 13 miles north of
Kenansville, for a turkey processing
plant.
W.W. (Woody) Brinson Jr.,
Duplin County economic develop
ment director, said the next step in
the companies' joint venture will be
to have test wells drilled to de
termine the quantity and quality of
water available at the site.
The planned turkey processing
plant will use up to 2 million gallons
of water per day.
Several parties own the land.
The two companies have formed a
business partnership for construc
tion and operation of an $18 million
plant capable of processing 12
million turkeys a year.
When it gets into operation the
plant will employ 800 to 1,000 people
with an annual payroll of more than
$8 million.
F.J. "Sonny" Faison, president of
Carroll's said last fall that plans call
for a 200,000-square-foot plant.
Both companies are major turkey
processors, each turning out about 6
million birds or 100 million pounds if
live-weight turkeys a year.
The companies expect to increase
production as they bring the facility
into operation.
The two companies now contract
with about 3S0 turkey growers,
mostly in Duplin, Sampson and
Wavne counties. " Li
82nd Airborne Army
Chorus In Duplin Schools
The 82nd Airborne Army Lnorus
is marching your way. You'll want to
siand tall, sit tall and sing along as
the 24 young men sing a cappela a
wide selection of choral music. The
men inarch in singing and from that
first surprise on, the program is
impressive.
The concert is scheduled by the
U.S. Army recruiters at the Clinton
Recruiting Station in cooperation
with the Duplin County Arts Council,
the chorus is from Fort Bragg.
This is a concert which will have
community appeal and lo which the
public could be encouraged and
invited to attend. Perhaps you would
like to send a letter home or put forth
an invitation for the public and
parents who can to come to the
performance at your school ? parti
cularly at Warsaw Junior High
School, from where the new com
manding officer graduated. There
would likely be some interested
community members to welcome
Sgt. Bowdens back home!
Ihe 82nd Airborne Army Chorus
schedule is as follows: Monday, Jan
28 at North Duplin High School from
9:18-10:15 a.m.; Wallace-Rose Hill
High from 1:04-2 p.m.; and on
Tuesday, Jan. 29 at James Kenan
High School from 9:30-10:27 a.m.
and at Warsaw Jr. High School from
1:23-2:12 p.m.
Warsaw Jr. High is formerly
Douglass High School, Sgt. Bow
den's Alma Mater.
Duplin
County
AARP
Meeting
Milton Rice will be the speaker at
the Jan. 31st meeting of the AARP.
His subject will be "Cut the Cost,
Keep the Care," a consumer action
and health promotion program. This
is a program put on by the national
organization to improve health of
Senior Citizens without more cost.
He will show slides with his talk.
This is the first regular night
meeting of the organization and will
be held Jan. 31 at 6:30 p.m. at the
Senior Citizen Center in Kenansville.
Tickets will be $3.50 per person.
Reservations must be made by Jan.
28 so the food committee will know
how many to expect. Call 296-1511
and make reservations now.
Discussion: a method of confirm
ing others in their errors."
Ambrose Bierce
JANUARY,
I savings * *
A* I
Sofa & Chair by "Park Place." two
Styles. Suggested, SI739 SALE $999
Sofa & Chair & Loveseat by "Law
son". Loose auilted cushion style.
Suggested $1,347 SALE $800.
Sofa & Chair by "Lawson". Con
temporary styling. Suggested, $1198
SALE $710.
All "Bozof" Dinette Sets 40% OFF
Suggested Retail
w
40%
off
Select Group Of
Living Room Sets
Ixenansviiie SF|
I Drug <r-/W\ I
I Store YTt/r I
I ANNOUNCES 7 f il j I M I
I 10% Seniors I
I Citizens / & rapidly ?
I Discount ^
I On All Prescriptions Except Insulin I
I ANACIN MAALOX SUSP. .. ? ^1
I T"s 12 oz
|re?.s.49 *4.19 '2.73 5? H
|B MENNEn" i * 11 J
SPEED STICK PRELL -J1
II ^ 2.25 OZ. L,OU,D SHAMPOO U I
II T?L '3.29 *2.59 Reg. '3.63 *2.79^1
I COLGATE POLIDENT TAB |
? TOOTHPASTE w I
1.89 I Reg. '2.89 $2?43 J
I LISTERINE 'fifing]OIL OF OLAY I
I 18 OZ. sfcss* I 4 OZ-. I
CONTACT ?
M Reg. '3.89 "3SSjT I
    

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