North Carolina Newspapers

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VOLUME FOURTEEN SUB. RATES $1.50 YEAR.
Farmers Federation Meeting
Pasture improvement
will be emphasized at the
annual stock holders meet
ing of the Farmers Feder
ation for Yancey County
which will be held in the
Burnsville warehouse of
the organization at 10:30
a. m. Saturday, February
18, it has been announced
by Federation officials.
Sam Dobson, pasture
specialist of State College,
will speak on pastures with
slides to illustrate his talk.
Dobson will discuss the
best type of seeds and fer
tilizer to use for pasture
impi ovement.
James G. K. McClure,
president of the Federa-j
tion has been named by
Gov. Scott on a steering
committee for pasture im
provement.
Stock holders o f the
Federation in this county
will attend the annual
meeting for the .election of
committee members and
the nomination of one dir
ector, it was announced. I
RITES SET TODAY
FOR ALVINWESTALL
Alvin Westall, 23, son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Westall
of Hamrick, passed away, >
in an Asheville Hospital
following a shoi^illlness.
Funeral services are
planned for this afternoon
(Thursday) ~
Westall was a veteran
of World War II and in ad
• dition to his parents is sur
vived by four brothers,
Paul, Morris, Andrew and
Louis, and by one sister,
Muriel.
Paul liiiughrun Home
Sold to Edgar Angel
The Paul Laughrun
home in East Burnsville
was sold last week to Mr.
' and Mrs. Edgar Angel,
who have moved in.
Mr. and Mrs. Laughrun"
k moved Saturday to an ap
artment in the apartment
building opposite the Thea
tre. They plan to build a
home in the spring.
FARM NOTES
The following schedule
has been announced for the
Horse and Mule clinics
which are planned for the
county:
Tuesday, February 21
Hensley’s Mill 9:00 a. m.;
W. 0. Briggs Store 9:45 a.
m.; Mouth of Coxe’s Creek
10:30 a. in.; Day Book Post
Officer 11:15 a. m. Smith
Johnson 2:30 p. in.; Green
Mtn. Post Office 1:15 p. m.;
R. C. Deyton’s 2:00 p. m.;
Brush Creek Voting Place
3:00 p. m. Homer Young’s
Store 4:00 p. m.; CH^rles
p. m.
Thursday, February 23
Pensacola Post Office
9:00 a. in.: D. Z. Styles’ 10
a. m.; Hensley’s Store, Pri
ces Creek 11:00 a. m. Bill
Buckners 12:00; Higgins
Post Office 1:30 p. m.; Les
lie Proffitt 2:30 p. m.; Bald
Creek Post Office 3:30 p. m.
A Veterinarian will be
here and will examine the
animals free. *
The Yancey Record
The director nominated
will be voted upon at the
annual meeting of all stock
holders to be held in the
Buncombe County court
house on March 25.
Each director of the
Federation is elected for 2 I
years in such manner that j
one director from each I
county comes up for reele- j
etion each year, it was
stated.
The present directors
for Yancey County are;
Wilson Edwards and Tom
Ray.
Committee members for
Yancey County are H. W.
Higgins, Grover Robinson,
Sam Hilemon, A. P. Honey-.
Icutt John Hannum, Char
les F. Byrd, Lester Bailey,
E. N. Stamey, Dr. W. L.
Bennett, Thad Ray, Grov
er Anglin, T. K. Riddle.
At the meeting Saturday,
music will be furnished by
the Federation String
Band and baby chicks will
be awarded to several per
sons at the meeting. Re
freshments will be served.
Mrsy Holmes of Asheville
Purchases Home Here
Mrs. Josephine Holmes
of Asheville has purchased
the Max Penland home in
East Burnsville, and plans
to move into it in April,
and to make her
during the summers and
other vacation seasons.
Mrs. Holmes is director
of the dramatics depart
ment of the Plonk School
of Creative Arts in Ashe
ville and is a former dean
of the Curry College of
Speech in Boston.
A graduate of Ithaca
College, Ithaca. N. Y. Mrs.
Holmes has her M. A. de
gree and teacher’s diplo
ma from the Curry College
of Speech and for several
years was a professor in
the speech department at
Mt. Holyoke. She also dir
ected the speech depart
ment in the Norton School
kfArts, West Palm Beach,
Florida.
She has also had wide
experience in Little Thea
tre work, and in profess
ional theatre work. She
was organizer and mana
ger of the New London
Players, New London, N.
H. and was director of the
Artillery Lane Playhouse
in St. Augustine, Fla.
LAST RITES FOR
WILLIAM GREEN
Funeral services for
William Green, 36, of New
dale, who died Thursday
in a Spruce Pine hospital
after a long illness, were
held Saturday at 2:30 p.
m. in Martin’s Cliapel Met
hodist Church.
The Rev. M. D. Earle and
the Rev. E. C. Grover offi
ciated and burial was in
Young Cemetery.
NOTICE
LODGE MEETING
Bald Creek Lodge No.
397 A F & A M will hold a
stated communication in
the Hall at Swiss; N. C.,
Saturday, February 18th
at 7:30 p. m.
w bp)ICATED TO THE PROGRESS OF YANCEY COUNTY”
. BURNSVILLE, N. C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16,1950
Mt. Mitchell Refuge
Manager Transferred
W. C. Hall who has been 1
manager of the Mount i
Mitchell Game Refuge sin
ce May 1, 1949 has been
transferred to the Sand !
Hill Game Refuge Mana- ]
Igement Area, effective i
! March 1.
Hall has carried on his
'duties as refuge manager
in a most evident way and
has been very cooperative
with visitors to the refuge
as well as with local people
and with co-workers in the ;
management area. 1
Hall said that he, in i
turn, had enjoyed working i
with the people of Yancey
County, that they have co- <
operated in every way and i
that he regrets to sever;’
relations with the work <
here. j<
B. M. Rector is refuge !
protector at the Toe River i
entrance, and Lawrence J
King is protector in the
Curtis Creek section.
Classes in Commercial
Subjects Begun
Because of numerous re
quests for instruction in
typing and short hand,
classes have begun in these
subjects in the Burnsville !
High School Commercial !
Department from 5 to 7 p. <
m. five days a week.
Miss Gladys Young who
is secretary in the Anglin
law office is instructor.
Miss Young is a gradu
ate of King’s Business Col
lege, Raleigh where she
was employed for some
time as secretary to the
president and .instructor
for some classes in typing
and short hand. She did
further secretarial work
in Raleigh and Charlotte.
Those who are interest
ed may contact Miss Young j
by calling 19 or may go to 1
the school from 5 to 7. (
i
Micaville High School 1
______ i
Annual Dad’s Night
The annual observance
of Dad’s Night will take
place at Micaville on Feb
ruary IT. Dads of the ball
players and cheer leaders
will be guests for the ev
ening.
A basket ball game be
tween Bakersville and Mi
caville will be the main
event. Dads will receive
free passes and will repre
sent indiividual players by
wearing his or her number
for the evening. A special
section in the gym will be
reserved for the fathers'
and mothers.
After the game a social
hour will be held in the
school lunchroom. Dads 1
and Moms, varsity ball
players and acting cheer
leaders are invited to join
the coaching staff and tea
chers for refreshments.
“Dads” are urged to at
tend and show the players
that they are proud of,
them as the players are of
their Dads.
The Industrial Commis
sion is holding hearings in
Spruce Pine this week
with J. Frank Huskins,
chairman, presiding over
the sessions. Mr. and Mrs.
Huskins will be here for
the week end.
County Election Board‘d
Hwr —
The following men have
been named in the county
as nominees Tor the coun
ty election .board which
will be named later by the
state Republican,
Luther Ayers, Robert Pres
nell, Bill Banks; Democrat
James Hutchins, G. M.
Angel, Woodrow Anglin.
i-
Annual Farm Ownership
Meeting at Clearmont
The annujl meeting of
all Farm Ownership fami
lies will be held at Clear
mont High School on Fri
day, February 24.
The local personnel whi
ch will be in charge of the
meeting includes Mack B.
Ray, county supervisor,
O. W. Deyton, assistant
county supervisor, Mrs.
Naomi King, office clerk,
and Virginia York, assist
ant office clefk.
Regular*Navy Enlistments
Now Open
Young men between the
ages of 17 and 31 that can
meet the necessary requir
ments can enlist in the Re
gular Navy -' now. Young
Ladies between the ages of
20 and 30 that are High
School gradates can also
enlist. For further details
contact the-, ,Navy Recruit
ing Station in the Post Of
fice Biiiidfng," Asheville.
V accination of Dogs
-
We wish to take this op
portunity to thank the co
operative people of Yancey
county who had 320 dogs
vaccinated for Rabies at
the Clinics recently conduc
ted in the county. ™
This number is only a
very small fraction of the
dogs in the county but we
hope that others who own
dogs will have them vacci
nated each year and by so
doing help to eradicate that
dreadful disease (Rabies)
before some child or even
adult loses his life.
District Health Depart
ment. by Jake F. Buckner,,
district sanitarian.
BURNSVILLE—
“So They Say”
The weather: Just what
we’ve been predicting—
Winter! The temperature
dropped considerably be
low freezing Wednesday
p. m., a few flakes of snow
were flying through the
air when the ball game was
'over last night and Celo
and nearby peaks are fro
zen over white today. Still
no good sleigh ridin’ snow
! which the young and spry
are longing for.
About town: Latest ar
rival, Ward and Lela Bocf
ford Price’s son yesterday
in Norburn Hospital ~ . .
James and Jessie Fay Ram
sey and son have returned
( to Burnsville. They are
now living in house up at
Girls Camp from which the
Gladdens moved . . . More
new homes: Max Penland
sold his home to Josephine
Holmes twho will be a
wonderful addition to *the
town) and has another
house started across from
the John Wilsons on Long
view Drive . . . Paul Lau-
Expert Gun Maker of Yancey County
111 n t - .......
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John Hutchins 111, and part of his Gun Collection Photo by John Robinson
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Collection of old model Stevens and Remington Rifles in the John Hutchins’
collection. In the foreground is part of his revolver collection and in the back
ground several of the old model cars he made as a boy. Photo by John Robinson
When he was 14 years of
age he saw a 22 rifle which
he wanted very much. He
didn’t have the purchase
price of the whoie gun so
he bought the barrel and
made the gun! .
This lead to both a voca
tion and an avocation for
John Hutchins 111 of the
Banks Creek section of
Yancey County. For the
past 28 years since that
first 22 he has repaired
guns and other small ar
ticles to earn a living and
has made or restored guns.
He has worked on over 100
makes, nearly 2000 guns
in all.
’Sometimes he receives
remuneration for his re
pair jobs; often he accepts
guns or parts in payment.
He acquired a new Reming
ton rifle- last week in ex
change for a shot flask and
ghrun sold his house to Ed-"
gar Angel and plans to be
gin building in April . . .
Another “must build”, an
additional trophy case for
the Legion Team. Another
trophy brought back from
the Barnardsville tourna
ment. . . Grand opportun
ity: New classes in typing
and short hand during the
Burnsville College hours at
B. H. S. Gladys Young tea
cher. Anyone interested
should stop by from 6 to 7
and see how everything is
lined up ,
powder flask which had
been “thrown in” when he
swapped a revolver for
parts of a pionter squirrel
rifle some years ago!
Hutchins now has an
amazing collection of 118
guns of many types. Some
of these are entirely hand
made, others constructed
from parts and a number
complete from the factory.
He has never had a pow- j
er tool of any kind; all the i
giihs have been made with 1
simple hand tools from pie
ces of metal from every j
possible source. Junk heaps
old cars, pieces of worn out
farm equipment—all have
yielded material.
Every gun is so accurat
ely made or restored, how
ever, that it will shoot. In
fact, Hutchins has kept an
accuracy record of every
gun he has worked on and
■
Hutchins home on Banks Creek (rear view). In
s the kitchen is his work shop where he repairs and
rebuilds guns and other small arrieles.
GREEN
NUMBER THIRTY
until they satisfy his craft
sman’s standards for per
formance he does not con
sider them finished.
He uses the manufactur
er’s standard tests for ac
curacy: for rifles to hit 3
empty 22 shells at 20 feet
and for oistois to hit with
in a dime’s-area at 20 feet.
| With every 'gun he owns
is kept a card board square
I with the gun’s record.
Hutchins was born in the
same house in which he
Istili lives. It is reported to
ibe over 150 years old and
| the original old mud and
!stone chimney still serves.
In the kitchen is the huge
old fire place once used for
cooking as well as for
warmth “but an ordinary
kitchen range is now used.
In one corner of this room
is his work shop with the
(Continued on page two)
    

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