North Carolina Newspapers

    ESTABLISHED JULY. 1996
TRENA P. FOX, EDITOR & PUBLISHER
MISS. ZOE YOUNG. ASSOCIATE EDITOR
THURMAN L. BROWN. SHOP MANAGER
ARCHIE H. BALLEW. PHOTOGRAPHER & PERSSMAN
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY
YANCEY PUBLISHING COMPANY
SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT BURNSVILLE, N. C.
THURSDAY. SEPT. M, IM7 NUMBER THREE
SUBSCRIPTION RATES $3.00 PER YEAR
OUT OF COUNTY $4.00 PER YEAR
«
Scene From Top O’ The Hill
By: Jack Kelly
With the new Federal tax bills
passed and contemplated, it will
SJx.n eventuate that if you lose
a nay's pay, the Government
will lore as much as you do.
That is doubtless an exaggerat
ed statement. However, taxes
are getting to be a bit of a pro
blem. Not only to us who pay
them but to the Gentlemen of
the House of Representatives
who pass the Bills that bring
them into existance. They have
to return to their respective Dis
tricts and prove to their con
stituents that paying more taxes
was a splendid idea. If they fail
to do so, they get beaten at the
next election and are out of a
job The only pleasant thing
they would have going for them
then would be the fact that they
could gripe about taxes rising.
Obviously, if there happened to
be . simple solution to the tax
question, it would have been
solved long ere this. None of us
can object with any reasonable
argument to the money it costs
and which we are spending to
promulgate or forward the War
effort. Regardless of anyone’s
opinion as to whether we should
or should net participate in it,
wo are in it. Ergo, it costs us
iTHio.y The Govembent gets
money from taxes raised from
tin people, so it looks like us
po' pl<- are in for a long, hard
pull *
There was a time when many
pc- pie could, and did, advance
loci* al. workable arguments
which showed where cuts could
he made in Domestic spending
as opposed to Foreign snoring.
N'-wadavs. present conditions
being what they are. no one can
suggest this because the big
si’ceestors are clamoring for
billions and billions to he ex
pended f'T education, housing,
job education, and anything else
that anyone can call to mind
One wonders hannened to
the old idea which worked very
*eU f'T many, many of us,
whereby we worked our way
lb’"'ugh school and attended
nioht classes As for housing,
this new system whereby the
Government will pav your rent,
so to speak, is a pip. It works
something like this. vr>u build a
niep place and a poor person
wants to live in it hut can’t af
ford to pay a rental that would
give you a reasonable return on
your investment so the Gov
ernment will let the "poor” per
son move in and pay a portion
o( the rent and it will pick up
the tab for the rent
No one has said it hut. some
where along the way. some one
has figured it out that a “poor”
person should live just like a
■ rich” pers* n It makes no mat
ler to Hi*- new planners that > *j
worked and saved and did what
ever else was necessary to ach
ieve your present state. These
fellows want to give it to the
ma* who never made it on his
own They care not whether he
even tried. Probably he gets
more points if he didn't.
My understanding of "job
education” is that a person got
a job where there was need for
an employee. After which, that
person displayed aptitude and
ability and was on the way to
ward better things or else if
the lack of these two qualities
appeared, the person got fired.
No longer will that be the sys
tem. The new system will re
quire you to place a certain
amount of bodies on your pay
roll in specified jobs for speci
fied amounts. Don’t let it get
you down that the bodies hired
have no ability in the position
placed or have even less ambi
tion to advance. It is your busi
ness and they could care less
what happens to you or it. Some
body, some place, some time,
is going to have to call a halt to
some of these new operations,
else we become a Social State.
All of this brings to mind a
Tennessee newspaper who quot
ed a Washington gentleman as
having said: "I am an in-be
tween Citizen. I am at the wrong
age and position in life. Too
young for Social Security and
Medicare, too prosperous for
Welfare, too urban for crop sub
sidies. and too Amo Scan for
Foreign Aid.”
It is fortunate that our ances
tors have departed. Thev might
have done more than just gripe
about things. Once they straight
ened out the Country and it ran
along pretty good for a
century* and a half or more.
As a matter of fact, just one
hundred years ago cur Country
was moving so smoothly that the
post-Civil War business-world
we’comed the advent of the
first robe manufacturing com
pany, for use in horse and bug
gies, in Sanford, Maine. This
business did not fare as well or
last as long as the chewing gum
business which started about the
same time. Incidentally, if you
had had a desire to try this new
fangled confection, you would
have had to travel to Jersey
City.
If something isn’t done about
conditions our Country will stag
nate. Stagnation, in Nations,
precedes decline. Decline Os this
C untry is a dreadful thing to
contemplate. Particularly is this
s~ when the decline would be
attributable to our own efforts.
Someone must have a remedy
or a stop-acticn s<~me place that
will not only halt our aim but
cha'nge cur direction.
Perhaps the up-erming election
might furnish the answer. From
here, it looks like it might be a
real horre-race if and that is
a big "if" the Republicans
come up with a sensible ticket. 7
Youngsters Can
Take Part In
War Effort
Youngsters of today are learn
ing about the privileges and re
sponsibilities of their American
heritage and their lessons are
not confined to classroom stud-
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MATHS
Death, we think is such a
terrible word and there is none
other that can cause us to feel
more disturbed. It is something
we don’t understand and we
fear. We think our loved ones,
are gone from us forever and
this brings heartbreaking tears.
When we lose our loved ones we
ask God why but I believe he
plans things perfect and we’ll
understand in the sweet by and
by. We have many beliefs and
ideas about the great eternity
but I just think where Jesus is
will be good enough for me. I
wouldn’t want to stay here for
ever because our bodies and our
minds grow old. Heaven holds so
many wondrful promises and I
don’t think all of its beauty and
happiness has ever been told. If
our loved ones died with Jesus
in their hearts we will see them
again someday never more to
part. Wherever they’re at they
are so happy they wouldn’t want
to awake and to bring them back
here would be an awful mistake.
If you could bring them back
here I believe that you would
find, that they have changed
and thev are not exactly like the
people they have left behind. If
you have a loved one that has
left you, grieve no more. Just
let them become one more good
reason for wanting to enter
heavens door.
Clara Cassida
ies of history and civics. Many
of cur young people have fathers
or brothers fighting in Vietnam.
To them, the war is always real,
sometimes traggic.
There is a need for thetse
young folks to take part as
individuals in the defense of
freedom. They must feel that
they, too, really share in Am
erica.
They can. There is away for
them to participate in their
country’s affairs and, at the
same time, form a habit of per
sonal thrift that will reward
them throughout their lives.
The Treasury’s School Savings
Program, which operates in
many of our schools, encourages
youngsters to buy U. S. Savings
Stamps on a given day each
week. When enough stamps have
been accumulated, they may be
converted into U. S. Savings
Bonds U. S. Savings Stamps
available'in denominations from
10 cents to $5 - are also sold
at post offices.
When a student buys a Sav
ings Stamp he knows he’s not
just putting aside money for a
new bicycle or college costs He
knows he's he'ping his country
meet its commitment** at home
and abroad He's learned his
lessons wHi
GARDEN TIME
By: M. E. GARDNER
Fall of the year is the better
season for establishing the per
manent lawn using the ever
green grasses such as fescue
and bluegrass. Preparation of
the soil is very important and,
in many cases, is not thoroughly
done. Some suggestions may be
helpful.
A soil test is best to determine
the need for lime, phosphate and
organic content of the soil. Since
so few home owners will take
the time for this test, we will go
out on a limb and make sugges
tions without the test.
Prepare the soil to a depth of
four to six inches by plowing,
discing or rototilling. Then ap
ply the following evenly over
the prepared surface: 35 pounds
of a 5-10-10 fertilizer (granular
form better than pellets) per
1,000 square feet of area; then
60 pouads of dolomitic lime per
1,000 square feet; then about
two inches of peat moss or very
old sawdust. Work the lime, fer
tilizer and organic matter into
the soil to a depth of at least
four inches. This can best be
done with a tiller or disc har
row.
It is important that both lime
and phosphate be incorporated
in the soil roct zone because
neither of these important plant
CROSSWORD ~
ACROSS
1. Writer of
fables
6
11 Backbone
IH. Old (German
silver coin
13. Apple
preparing
implement
11. City ip
Nebraska
15. Poem
16. Riding whip
IS. Cry of pain
10. Tellurium
(sym.)
20. Lean-to
21. Mr. Brynner,
actor
22. Pace
23. A covering
24 Automobile
gauge
27 Baby
carriage
(O. B.)
28. Moslem
garment
29. Garment
border
30. Kxcavatc
31. Spanish
(abbr.l
33. Overhead
• train
34. Bristle
35. Malt
beverage
3G Coin of India
38. Speaker's
mallet
10 I )ecree
•11 Kat away
42.1 'eiiomina
tloHS
food e’ements, once applied,
move readily in the soil.
Now you are ready So prepare
the soil for the seed bed. It
• should be raked smoothly and
evenly and rolled, if possible, to
firm the soil. If you are lucky
enough to have a good shower,
it will do the job of settling for
you. Or, you can irrigate.
After the job cf settling the
soil has been accomplished, rake
lightly and you are realy for
seeding. Seeding can be done by
hand or with a hand seeder.
Regardless of the method used,
the seeding should be uniform.
This can best be accomplished
by dividing the seed, for a given
area, into equal parts. Sow half
in one direction and cross-seed
the other half.
For fescue, use about three
pounds per 1,000 square feet:
for bluegrass about one and one
half pounds per 1,000 souare feet.
Rake the seed in lightly, mulch
with clean grain straw and
water.
Buy only certified seed and
the best available.
If you really want to do the
job according to Hoyle, fumigate
after the first steps of prepara
tion-tilling, etc. This will kill
weeds, shrubs and other soil
borne troublemakers.
•13. 'Meaning
DOWN
1. Broad tie
2. Lyric
poem
3. Title of
respect
4 Single unit
ft Sut
6. Endured
7 Pat down
8. Wing
9. Place in a
new abode
10. Fishing
craft
17 Lay away
20. Bunch of
bananas
21 Hindu
ascetic
22. Thin
stra
tum
(gcol l
23. Wax
24. Globes
2ft. Intro
duc-
tory
event
20. Conducts
30. Encounters
31. Vehicles
with
runners
32. Mount
Martinique
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34. Denomina
tion
35. Kuglish
river
57 Short for
picayune
39. Kxist
    

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