North Carolina Newspapers

    Bronx Boy Flyer
Tells Arctic Tales
Cempanlonate MarHiit Known
In North, Also Found
Bobbed llelr.
Now York World.
A BrOkix boy Just returning from
an adventurous flying trip In the
Arctttf Circle finds New York and
its civilisation dull and backward
as compared to the frigid lands
where ultra-modem Eskimos not
only chew gum, powder their noses,
bobtt)Cir hair and outdo the smart
est students at bridge, but practice
con^aalonate marriage as though
It wore an ordinary social custom.
p*Uj Felson of No. P64 Dawson
street, the Bronx, is only twenty, but
his interest in aviation has led him
to adventures over unknown lands.
The drudgery of a mechanic at
tlfttchel Field. L. I„ over a period
«f three jears being too tame an
occupation for Paul, he got himself
a Job with the Leoning Aeronauti
cal Corporation, and with It the
opportunity for adventure came.
Jack Rammel of the Northern
Aerial Minerals Corporation, Ltd.,
recently bought a Loening amphi
bian for $36,000 and employed Paul
M A mechanic on a prospecting
trip normward. The flight to
r
DR. D. M.
MORRISON
i
OPTOMETRIST
Eyes Examined, Glasses
Fitted and Repaired.
Located next to Haines
Shoe Store.
(Down Stairs)
S
SHELBY, N. C.
TELEPHONE 585
No one knows how to sec
that the funeral ceremony
Is conducted in a fitting and
appropriate manner quite
so well as docs an earnest,
trained, experienced and
conscientjgie funeral direc
tor
Mr
The expense is entirely
within your own control in
accordance with your wish
es when you confide the
funeral ^rrangments to
'il&MEV
Pftllston, N. C.
Funeral Directors
ami
-Service
ione No| 4
Night Phone No 6
o
I Montreal was tame. Paul's first
thrill came when Duke Schiller
boarded the cockpit, there. At Sud
bury, Ont.. he and Duke Schiller
I were arrested because the pilot did
not carry a license.
Paul did not mind being under
arrest for three days, at the end of
which he got another pilot and
both flew northward to Join Jack
Hammel at Read Lake After an
other series of flights they landed
at Baker Lake In the Northwest
territories where they were to Join'
the prospectors. The northern
most point they reached. Paul said
yesterday, .as about :i,000 miles
from the Bronx at Chesterfield In
let in the Arctic Circle.
It was at Chesterfield where they
met Eskimos, who noticed with won
derment how the amphibian, whose
pontoons had been broken, stopped
flying and lay stockstill on the snow
They could not understand, he said,
how the Tlngmuck (bird ot the alri
ceased soaring.
But the flyers were not destined
to meet the prospectors, who were
supposed to await them They had
lost the trail and left a note that
they were trekking back to civiliza
tion. One of them died and the oth
er they found later on with frozen
feet, which eventually were ampu
tated. This ended the prospecting
trip this year. I
"Speaking of companionate mar
riage," Paul said, "why the Eski
mos have known it from time mi
known. The children are married
at birth, and If, when they grow
up they don't like their nudes Why
they can Just swap wives with an
other disgruntled hmbund. But
the husband retains the right to
Uke back his babyhood love any
time he chooses.
"Eskimos Insist that thetr wives
take the vow of obedience at the
.wedding ceremony. Among the
wife’s duties Is the Job of chewing
his frozen sealskin boots soft!"
AI.L CHICAGO DEBUTANTES
HAVE LONG HAIR THIS TEAR
Chicago —If Chicago’s winter de
butantes set the fashion, bobbed
hair Is definitely taboo. No one of
(he 36 newcomers to select society
has bobbed hair.
‘‘All of us feci that if youth is
to retain any Individuality tt must
lead the way back to golden locks
and raven tresses," said Miss Letitla
Channon, a deb.
One proprietress of a Michigan
avenue hairdressing shop is so op
posed to long Khlr that she refuses
to employ girls who allow- their hair
to grow.
l.lkfs Gardner's f arm Pollry.
Spartanburg Herald.
Mr. Gardner entertains the view
that such backwardness as North
Carolina agriculture displays is pey
chologtcal—a lmng-over from slav
ery days. Ha holds, too, that the
present is (he psychological t.inie"^t>
break the hold of those habits of
thought.
Recent governors of North Caro
lina have stressed educational prog
ress and It hat. been made, they
have emphasized Industry and that
has advanced. The building of the
highways two administrations ago,
was the big objective and that Ufcs
accomplished. The retiring gover
nor of North Carolina has given
the state a business administration
seeking to adjust Its affairs in a
sort of general stock taking after
a period of unprecedented expan-!
slon and that has served. So it is'
a case of tire man and the Issue
utee; :n.r if Governor Gardrcr is to
place tire agricultural standard at
the head of his column arc carry
the farming interests of his state
forward thr;>u*bout his administra
tion.
Try Star Job Printing
“6^67
Is A Prescription For
Colds, Grippe, Flu, Dengue,
Kilious Fever and Malaria, t
It is the most speedy remedy known <
10
Copeland’s Health Talk
Baby’s Sunshine
HY ROYAL S. COPELAND, M. D.
United Matts Senator Apd Former llettilli Cniumssioner of New Fork.)
It a baby Hunks and could talk, what a lot we might learn about
how to trdht infants. It is true that a youngster may yell its protest,
yet we arc often at a loss to know just what it is that displeases the
child. We are not sure whether it is gas or a pin.
It isn’t a bad idea to be imagining often how you would feel if cir*
DR. COPELAND
cumstanced t
ample, stippo:
led IX you we
army blanket
stockings.
In these
swaddled in
children are
skirts. It w
average betv.t
The baby
skin. The ole
Ilrom the cold
V/e learn
skin. That
the grown-up
great extent the welfare of the bab;
Activity of the skin depends or
In turn Is determined by the care
makes a close study of the skin an
him.
Exposure to sunshine Is ore ol
skin In prime condition. Kxjrclsc
Now you will laugh at me. "Sure
ly" you say, "you do not expect an
Infant to get out every day for a
long walk."
No, I don't. Tlut. babies require
exercise even if they cannot walk.
Strip off all those thick garments
and bands. Then see what the baby
does.
Find a place In your house where
a wide couch, the bed, or a strip of
carpet can get the full effect of the
bright sunshine. Make sure it Is
warm enough in that room not to
chill the baby. Spread a sheet on
the chosen spot and place the naked
baby there.
My, what a time of wiggling and
kicking It, will have. Let the little
chap kick and squirm to his heart's
content, That Is baby's way of get
ting exercise. That Is the way na
ture Intended to strengthen the
muscles and Improve the circula
tion.
Improvements have been made In
the manufacture of glass. It-is dnado
now’»o that the materials-which
cuts out certain qualities of light Is
eliminated. The sunlight has all
its good effects, which cannot be
felt unless such glass Is used In
the windows. But If the day Is
warm enough to open the windows,
then the baby will get the direct
rays of the sun and every bit of
their virtues. But if you haven't
the new-fangled glass give your
baby all you crii of the sunlight,
even if it is filtered through or
dinary glass.
Keep the .skin clean by regular
bathing. If the skin does not act as
it should have the tub bath as hot
as 1 » af\|L continue it
rather TtWjiWteitian usual* Sweating
ts good iorveveh'body. *'•
The more active the skill is the
less strain will be placed 'on the
Kidneys. In this way the poisons of
the body arc eliminated.
Answers To Health Queries.
E. L. I. Q.—What, would Cause
iiain and soreness in both sides and
wound the back attjp&)pjMiicd by
pain in the lower psrl afcthe abdo
neii?
2. -What should a young woman
twenty-five, 5 ft. 9 in. tall—
veigli?
3. —Is there any cure lor a goitre?
A. —Very likely due to gases caus
'd by Improper digestion, causing
he food to ferment. Watch- your
lift and be sure that the intesti
nal tract is kept clear.
2. — She should weigh about 150
iounds.
3. —There arc several different
ypes of goitre each requiring spe
lftc treatment. In some Instances
ABA
xactly as the child is. As an ex
ie you try to think how you would
rc bundled up with a couple of thick
?, a woolen hood and long, thick
modern days many tiny babies arc
thick and tight clothing and older
dressed in short socks and shorter
ouldn't be a bad idea to strike an
rn the two practices,
needs the effects of sunshine on the
cr child needs to be better protected
much from the appearance of the
gives a good idea of the health of
It:: condition determines to a
tlic circulation of the blood. This
of the body s surfaces. The doctor
1 the mother will do well to imitate
the very best ways to keep the
is unother important consideration.
simple medication is effective in
others more drastic treatment is
essential Sec your doctor for his
advice.
Prohibition officials are working
on a plan to make the city of Wash
ington bone-dry. We respectfully
refer this matter to the Society for
the Abolition of Capital Punish
ment.—The New Yorker.
COMMISSIONERS SALE.
Pursuant to an order of the court
made in special proceedings entitled
E. C. Smith et. al. vs. Bessie Fisher,
et. al. dated December 31, 1928, the
undersigned commissioner will of
fer for resale at public auction for
cash at the court house door tp
Shelby. N. C. on Thursday, Janu
ary 31, 1929 at, 12 o’clock, noon, the
following described real estate:
A tract of land situated in No. 5
township, Cleveland county and
bounded as follows:
Being that tract of land convey
ed from Christopher Felmont and
wife, Margaret Felmont to James
K. Smith by deed dated March 3.
1881, and recorded in book MMM
at page 61 in register’s office, Cleve
land county. Beginning on a black
oak, R. M. Elliott's comer. and
runs thence N. 7b E. 112 poles to a
rock apd persimmon tree; thence
S. 32 E. 44 poles to a stake on
school land; thence S. 59Vi W. 16
poles to a stake; thence S. 32 E. 10
poles to a stake; thence S. 59«i W.
29 2-3 poles to a stake; thence N.
69 W. 72 poles to a stake and point
ers; thence N. 81 w. 24 poles to the
beginning, containing 22 % acres,
more or less.
Terms of sale: Cash. Date of
sale: January 31, 1929, « ■
PEYTON McS^AfN,
Commissioner.
When Is Best Time
For Your Working?
News & Observer.
What is the best time to work?
In what hours is a man's mine} at
its best? If these questions should
be asked of the members of the
staff of a morning paper, the an
swer would be, “The best writing
is done in the night." The old
time editors, who worked until 3
a. iii., would say they could do their
best thinking around midnight. And
morning paper writers would face-!
tiously say that the reason the1
morning papers were better than
the afternoon papers is because it
requires the quiet of the dark to
stimulate to the best achievement.
On the other hand, those who make
an afternoon paper would say that
! their contribution are brighter be
| cause they follow God's .dan and
i work when the sun gives light and
i warmth.
mere are many others,, m addi
tion to editors and authors, who
seek the night for their best pro
duction, substituting tlie house set.
apart for sleeping before artificial
light turned night into day. And
now they teh us that active bust- !
ness men find that the stress and
strain of the business‘hours, leave
them no time for making their best
plans. The Columbia State tells
of a very successful business man on j
Wall Street who enjoys 'he repu
tation of a man who never works
and yet manages to accomplish
more than any of the men who
seem most active during the rush
of short business hours, and quote.,
him as saying:
I read the other day that Pierre
Lott does his best literary work in
the hours between 2 and 5 in the
morning, and that his reason is his
brain is more active then. I am
up at 2 o'clock every morning ex
cept Saturdays and Sundays, take a
cold plunge, and dig into work with
a clear head and active brain un
til 5 o'clock or so, when I turn In
for a nap until 7. It's perfectly
quiet up when 1 live in the early
morning. That's the time when I
digest annual reports, tables of sta
tistics my clerks have prepared dur
ing the day and make plans for
the day ahead of me and the near
future. I know I get a better out
look then than I can in the bustling
hours of a business day. So 1 take
things easy in the time when oth
ers are working under pressure and
more or less distraction. Hence my
For colds, grip
and flu take
Relieve* the congestion,
pretents Complications,
and hastens recovery.
j YOU’LL WHISTLE
In amazement at the low price of this 530 acre
mountain farm. Can be bought in plots or as a
whole In two miles of No. 20 Highway. Sixty acres
of good bottom land. 500 acres can be cultivated.
Two fair houses and outbuildings. Reason for Sell
ing-Division among heirs. Excellent terms. Write
or see
CHAS. Z. FLACK
„ FOREST CITY, N. C.
j reputation as an idler, i ve simpiv
anticipated the other fellows and
whatever of success 1 have had
is due to my way of working.
It is still true, as he says, that
there is a freshness in the early
morning hours which many Hunk
ers find gve mord' inspiration than •
any other period .of the hi hours. It
is not always true that "early to
bed and eaiiy to rise makes a man
healthy, wealthy and wise," but
there Is much to be said in tavor of
using Gods sunshine rather than
depending upon artificial light.
ro RESIST THE ATTACK—of cold.
or grippe—put
your system
I and your blood
Vi order. Uuild
up your health
\v i t h that
yr UtTLUU
tonic. Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Dis
cover}-. which has stood the test, of
sixty years of approval. 'I'he air vvc
hreathc is often full of germs, if our
vitality is low we're an easy mark
for colds or pneumonia.
One who hits used the “Discovery”
writes thus:
Memphis, iron. ' I always have Buffered
Jhoif or less with indigestion anil u limes
• *■ 1 Mood would h* iiii't fiul im k?di*uI i
health poor. J found lUai 1). Piute (d>l- j
dm MedtVul l)i>-'ow:y bcn^fVtod me more j
than any other remedy. ii always relieved my
•toinaili iiouhle and mtichcd my Mood y> !
that I felt like a new person. 1 am convinc'd I
that nothing tan Mirpaacs it. n» a gtf.ei.tl ton- '
it. -Mis. J. t\ Mitchell, 277 Illinois bt»
Fluid or tablets. Ml druggists.
Write Dr. Pierce's Invalids Hotel,
in Buffalo, N. Y., for free advice. i
BOLL GIN READY
To the Public. We now have our lat
est machinery installed and are now
ready to gin your cotton in the boll.
This machinery has an advantage over
the older machinery for this kind of
work. It has a new designed separa
tion which enables our customers to get
a better price of ginning.
Bring us your boils in good dry con
dition and thereby save what you have
made.
We are going to buy this cotton and
seed, paying as much as possibe.
We also will buy bolls where people
do not have enough for a bale.
W. A. CROWDER & SON j
Lattimore, N. C. j|
____J!)
CONDENSED STATEMENT OF
UNION
TRUST CO.
SHELBY, N. C.
Including Branch Offices at Lattimore, Lawndale and Fall
ston, at the Close of Busines', December 3l3t, 1928.
RESOURCES OVER ONE M'LLION TWO HUNDRED
THOUSAND DOLLARS.
— RESOURCES —
Loans and Discounts _„ $1,023,407.28
Overdrafts __ 3,176.72
United State Liberty Bonds 51,921.88
Other Bonds and Stocks __ 17,400.00
Real Estate- 5,000.00
Fixtures_ 5,000.00
Cash on Hand and Due
From Banks__ 178,560.00
TOTAL
$1,284,468.97
— LIABILITIES —
Capital — —---$100,OUO.00
Surplus-...._83,000.00
Undivided Profits__ 4,868.20
Reserved for Ta::os_ 1.590.OO
Reserved for Interest_32,105.07
Rills Payable- 52,000.00 ■
Dividends Unpaid_3.000.Q0
Deposits- 1,005^05.70
*-—» ,j "pj.i jfr~u Wyn
1'OTAL---81,284,408.97
THE CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS OF THE
UNION TRUST CO.
♦ • ' r* -; .. •- — .... ,—, — - - ' - ;
Will be pleased with the above report, which reflects growth
and encouraging progress. On the basis of the Strength and
Growth of this Bank we solicit your business. We are natur
al y pleased with this statement has it is the largest we have
ever published.
UNION
TRUST CO.
SHELBY - LATTIMORE - LAWNDALE - FALLSTON
BANKING - INSURANCE - TRUSTS
IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH.’
*>
Car Load Good Mules To Be Sold At i
ABSOLUTE AUCTION i
Saturday, January 12, 1929 at 11 O’Clock l
Crowder
Lattimore, N. C.
....Sc""1 ss'swsjsi strife tc* • *•—- .«•
C. R. DOGGETT & CO. and CLINE BROS, shelby, n. c.
%
i
IOBO
30
I0C301
socaoocssoE
301=301
    

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