North Carolina Newspapers

    nvicts Make Honest Living
e Ostracism Of Society
US Kind
Mj|ap-Ytafaur* Have
^lip£i(oeonnte.
*lto», Tow §C tow, they
J& jpwou -for a maqhtnc civill
men who
\>nce sneered and snarled and seiz
a ed what they desired, writes Earl
ij Sparling in The New York Tele
p gram.
There are sixty, of them, sixty
former convicts, and at the Amazon
' Leather Goods factory. 25 W 26th
street, they manufacture purses
" An erstwhile salt-shocd burglar
Jj sit* next to a reformed hard heeled
bandit; >a sly pickpocket elbows a
jj sleek confidence man, and they la
!j bcwfrelgtit hours a day to make frail
purser of kid and cloth.
■ffie”^iectaeie is presented by the
Marshall fttlUpian Movement, which
, acquired the factory January 13,
HCMf’warthere another such fa
j torf as this one in 26th street, where
!; rignt^fiyi' learning to make
' a Jdghteous living.
|) The Marshall Stillman organize
jj tton started placing former con
j‘ victs at these work benches months
a^.'then die place *as owned by
Frederick J. Qrochl, As a former
J city magistrate afid assistant dts
jj trict attorney and a criminal law
y yet who had defended Gerald
* Chapman, the bandit, who paid a
!' mqpMpgttt Worjd he had def ied by
■i daltglMg on one of its strangest
creations, a hanging machine,
Oroehl was interested In the pos
sibility of reclaiming outlawed men,
mid eventually sold the factory to
the organization for $100,000, raised
by public offering of stock, part of
which is still being sold by R. H.
("ratty”) Keller, recently an Inmate
of Sing Sing.
Pcture • Fatty" Keller ambling
into the offices of Wall street mil
lionaires to tell them about the
Marshall Stillman Movement In
dustries, the president of which ts
Oroehl,- the mnn who gave "Fatty"
the first of his several sentences
Some jack-trade fiction writer
could build a story out of "Fatty"
alone,
"Pardon my appearance. Mister. I
ain't used to this kind of thing I
Just got out of the stir. Took my
stretch on a rap. Mr. Paul Felix
Warburg—you know the guy—met
me at a tea at the Blltmore hotel
and said I ought to be able to sell
you some of this stock He gives me
your name see? Now this factory
is"-—
But away with "Fatty" This story
of the 26th street factory should V
told by Harry Naler, the gentle,
amiable superintendent, who has
never been arrested even for run
ning paat, a traffic light.
"I been here for years,” says
Naler. ”8ay. T could tell you lots
I was here when the first one of
these fellows came here. Judge
Oroehl sent him to the pen first,
MORE
Issac Shelby Flour
I* Used In Cleveland
County Than Any Other
Two Flours that are Sold
in This Section.
- Dependable Goodness
And Wholesomeness Are
The Reasons.
Eagle Roller Mill Company
A PCCFLY
FERTILIZE FIELD
LIKE
A HALF-MILKED COW
When you milk a cow, you get all the milk you
can. Why not get all tke yield your toil will
giro you?
When a man hay worked hard, he ought to get
a good crop. But he can’t unleat there’s the
right kind 01 plant food in the soil for the crop
to hotter the plant food in the soil the
hi|g«? and finer the crop will be.
er’s of Known Quality
PfEttUzcr of known quality is the only kind to
SUJT. Xou know this about Royster’s: it’s been
tkc job right for 44 years. It’s always
quality. Easy to put down. Always
A perfectly blended, perfectly
foctly balanced formula for every crop.
-FOR
TUI/ /ICN
ROYSTER
FIELD TESTED
Fertilizers
and when he comes out he sends
him here for a Job.
"I guess I was sort of surprised
that first day. but, I tell you, I’m not
surprised now. We got here one of
the best factories in America. These
boys are the best workers In the
world. They increased the output
ns much as 20 per cent. Tliey come
to me Just the other tiny and of
fer to work six hours more a week j
for nothing. Oet that!
“And, say, we don’t need no bur- j
glary Insurance around this place. |
We could leave the doors open and |
the safe unlocked every night in'
the week, if uny bird broke in here
some night I'd know the next inorn-!
mg who does It. They get grape- !
vine ways, you sec.
Don't ask me how. How should I,
know? They don't do anything like
that themselves any more, but they!
know who does. If any one in this ;
factory was to take as much as a ;
pockrtbook, I'd know within ten!
minutes.
These boys get a share of the
profits as well as regular pay. No’
one will ever rob this factory, you
bet.
"Yes, I guess I was kind of nerv
ous when we first started all this. |
For a while the cops used to come
in every day to look for suspects,
and some of my best workers would
run and liide on the fire escapes.
You know how it is with a cop. He
can make a suspect oat of anybody
1 that's been in prison. They don't
come any more now.
I wnui um mi Uic.n: uuya uui
! Sny, do.i t ask mo. I don't want to
I know, rot me. In the beginning I
u;cd to call them into my offire
and ask a lot of questions. I got one
young it ’.low who was a bandit and
he started telling me nil the people
he cut up. He names this fellow and
that fellow until my blood runs
cold, and then he names one or my
ljest friends, who got held tip in
Bronx a couple of years ago. Say,
for S50 that fellow cuts my friend
almost from ear to ear, like this.
Just for $00 and my friend would
of given .‘•"aOO to keep that from
happening. *Oh, don’t tell me no
more!' I tell that young bandit. And
never again do I ask any questions.
Oh. sure, that young bandit still
works here He's one of the best
workers I got."
Sixty former convicts, elbow to
elbow, row on row, manufacturing
purses that once they would have
stolen. Each has a bank account
now. Three-fourths of them are
married. They do not look like con
victs. They are young, mast of
them- Mere boys, and their faces
are not different from those of
millions who sit at machines else
where In this roaring, clanging re
public.
They . . . but, perhaps, the story
Is not In them, nor even In Alplieus
deer, founder or the movement,
who entertains two-termers tn hts
home, who writes to .Einstein con
cerning the monism of the uni
verse, who once’ proposed that
every subscribing member of his or
ganzation wear a badge that would
protect hlh» from thugs, who be
lieves that spiritual apprehension
is the one thing worth while.
Perhaps the story is In us, the
cltiaeiis of the ordinary world, Eorv
look, we have come to write of
these former convicts,-but we find It
impossible to talk to them.
We summon Sapi Sacco, their
leader, ten (years In (Sing fling. We
try to talk to- hint. The tongue halts
and the words fail. There Is ft bar
rier between us. “I will tell you
j anything you want to know,” says
j Sacco. “It is not so good to get
1 your name in print like this, but
I some one has to make a sacrifice
1 to help along.” Sam tries. We try.
But the attempt dwindles and dies.
There is a high wall, a wall that
stretches from heaven to hell.
At the benches the other makers
of purses are peering furtively.
Turn ever so quickly, and they are
earnestly busy again with their
machines. But they are watching,
wonder'ng. You know it with the
back of your head. Men watch like
that In prison as the screws stalk
by the bars.
vouwoma nice to ssk inese men
question*. But not use. They Are
honest citizens with bank nccounts
and homes and wives. But they
live behind a wall which even Al
pheus Geer, gray, lingering apostle
of what Gilbert Seldes calls the
Stammering Century, may not be
ablq.tp.tpar.Ttew^ ,
GF.QRCK WASHINGTON WAS
^ BORN ON FEBRUARY 11
(From Romance of the Calendar.)
In the Washington family Bible
it l& recorded, that George Wash
ington was born on "Ye 11th day of
February.” When he was 20 years
old in 1752. America, as a British
colony .adopted.Uie. Gregorian Van
adium Steel 193 1-2 101 101 1-2. cal
endar and dropped the 11 days be
tween September 3 and 14. Since
that time we have* celebrated
Washington’s birthday on Febru
ary 82! ' 1 '■
How JToICet RH>b.
It s easy to get rich, declares H.
J. Kenner, writing In a current is
sue of Christian Herald. All the
man or wfiman desiring a firm I
financial background needs to do,
Mr. Kenner believes, Is to have a
steady income, however small; save!
some of that income for Invest-1
inent; and then, most important of
all. keep a wary eye out lor the
pitfalls that are constantly being
r« j>ared by swindler for the per
son with surplus money. * /j
I
L
HEWS HEMS TOLD
Juniors And Seniors Give Play, j
Program On Lincoln. Senior I
Class Officers Elected.
i Special to The Star.)
Behvood, Feb. 21.—The play given '
by the Juniors and seniors on Fri
day evening, February 8 was a de
cided success. The players pre-!
.sented their characters well to be!
immature pupils. $59 was taken in.!
As usual at our school, the order
was almost perfect. It does us good I
when our substantial patrons and
friends say of us, "it was better
tliau I expected ”
The enrollment by grades is as
follows: First grade. 120; second,
70; third. 50; fourth, 35; fifth, (12;
sixth, 37; seventh, 33; high school,
100. Music department, 27. A total
ol 507 pupils have been enrolled
this year.
Last week the grades gave some
very interesting programs on Lin
coln and his work. Also the scouts
observed their 19th -anniversary
suck. Good turns, life-saving and
other demonstrations were given
Last Sunday at 3 p. m. "Rev. Rush
Padgett gave the scouts ahd about
three hundred others a good ser
mon on the three phases of life,
physical, mental and spiritual
Wednesday the I3th Belwood troop
No. 1 was welcomed by the newly
organized troop ol Fallston Our
boys gave a demonstration in
tcouting to the hosts ifi the lat
her's auditorium. Mr. Propst, Bel
wood's good scoutmaster, reports
that all the old members TfAVe re
registered with but one or two ex
ceptions. Several new members
have Joined. The troop is now be
yond the limit in number.
The senior class has organized as
follows: Class motto, “Climb. Tho'
the rocks be rugged.'' Class colors,
white and green, Class flower,
white carnation. Historian. Ruth
Tillman. Poet, Corine Hoyle. Gift
orian, Vangie Mull. Statistician.
Charlotte Peeler. Prophet, Selma
Propst. Orator, Robert Porter. Elva
Richard and Ima Carpenter will
present tljc class song. Leona Mull
will maki the class will. Members
of the senior class are as follows:
Ralph Carpenter, president; Rob
ert Porter, vice president: Char
lotte Peeler, secretary; Ima Car
penter, treasurer; Clyde Costner,
Leona Mull, Florence Dayberry,
I Selma Propst, Corine Hoyle. Ruth
' Tillman, Vangie Mull. Greek Nor
■ man, Zeila Willis, Elva Richard,
Robey Bracket, Pauline Lackey,
Ray Sparks.
j The school calendar for the re
mainder of the year is about full
The following entertainments will
be given: March 1, we take part in
the Webb contest at Shelby; March
15, negro minstrel; March 17, or
the third Sunday in March at 3 p.
nt. Dr. Davis, president of Bolling
Springs junior college will preach
in the school auditorium, Belwood;
\ WOMAN’S HEAD is level and her
judgment good
when she puts
her faith in
Dr. Pierce's
Favorite Pre
s c r i p t i o n.
There is no
beauty without
good health.
Nobody ex
.pects to
•become really
beautmil lrnm
he use of complexion beautiticrs.
iright eyes, clear skin, and rosy
.hicks, follow the use of the “Pro
cription,” All dealers.
( very woman rJqnlrrs a tonir and nervine
't some period of her lift*. Whether suffer
n* fiom nervousness, dirtiness. faintness or
rneral debility, the “Prescription" benefits:
Mrs. Emma Heffner of 5-llth St., f.reens
oro. N. C, said: “I could not do my work,
.’othing appeared lo give me relief. Finally
: took six bottles of Dr. Pierres lavorite
'rescription and then was a well and strong
oman."
LADY'S SUFFERING
She Writes Tfcet “A Friend
Told Me To Take Car.
dni and I Know
It Helped Me”
OneniHIe. Miss.—In describing:
how she suffered several years ago,
Mrs. Mattie Dalton, of 213 Walnut
Street, this city, recently wrote:
“I would cramp, and my hands
and feet would draw, so I came near
having convulsions. I would have to
stay in bed a week, and when I
would get up. I just dragged around,
and did not feel like doing my work.
I suffered a great deal with my
back.
"A friend came to sec me and
saw how I suffered. She told me to
try taking Cardut, which I did. I
seemed to have more strength, after
my first bottle. After I had taken
about four bottles of Cardul. I saw
a greet Improvement.
"I quit having such bad spells,
and was stronger and> better than
in a long time. I gained In weight.
I took a few more bottles of Cardul,
and felt so well that I quit taking It.
"I certainly can recommend Car
dul, for I know what It is to suffer,
and I know that Cardul helped me.”
Thousands of women have writ
ten to tell of the benefit Cardul has
been to them, in helping them to
build up their health.
April 5. triangular debate; April
12. speaking contest for grades 6
and 7; April 23, H. S. recitation
and declamation contest ; April 26.
improvement debate; May 3, musi
cal recital: May 4. exercise by
grades; May 5, at 3 p m. com
mencement sermon; May 6, oper
etta; May 7, graduating exercises
and address. The address will be
delivered this year by Attorney R.
M. Gantt of Durham. Mr. Gantt is
one of our own boys. All the above
mentioned exercises will be given
at 8 p. tn. except those mentioned
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF SUM
MONS BY I’l^BL-CATION.
North Carolina, Cleveland County.
In the Superior Court.
M. P. Garris. Plaintiff
vs. ^
Lena PrlvettrOarris, Defendant,
The defendant, Lena Prlvett Gar
ris, will take notice that an action
entitled as above has been com
menced ip the superior court of
Cleveland county. North Carolina,
for absolute divorce upon statu
tory grounds; and the said defend
ant will lurther take notice that
she is required to appear at the
office of the superior court of said
county in the court house in Shel
by, N. C., on the 23rd day of March
1929, and answer or demur to the
complaint in said action which has
666
Is A V ascription For
Colds, Grippe, Flu, Dengue.
Bilious Fever and Malaria.
It is the most speedy remedy known
Grove’s
Tasteless
CMU Tonic
A Body Builder for Pale, Deli
cate Children. It Restores
Health, Energy and Rosy
Cheeks by I Hi n tying and En
riching the Blood. Improves
the®Appetite. Pleasant to
take. (iOc.
this date been tiled with the clerk
of said superior court, or the plain
tiff will apply to the court for the
relief demanded hi said complaint
This first day of February. 1929.
A. M. HAMRICK. Clerk of the
Superior Court of Cleveland
County, N. C>
NOTICK COMMISSIONERS RE
SALE
Pursuant to an order ot the court
made in special proceedings in the
superior court of Cleveland county,
entitled E. C. Smith et. al. vs. Bessie
Fisher, et al„ the bid at a prior
sale having been raised in accord
ance with law, the undersigned, as
People
respect John
His insurance gives him in*
dependence. He is worth*
while alive and he’ll leave
something worthwhile
when he dies. He is pro*
viding for the safety ol
others. Let us explain how
he does it on his moderate
salary. Phone or call.
C. R. WEBB
General Agent,
Shelby, N. C.
OLD NEWSPAPERS FOR
sale at The Star office. Twen
ty cents per hundred. Call at
the press room. tf-26x
commissioner appointed by the
court, will offer for resale at the
court house door in Shelby, N. C..
at public auction to the highest
bidder for cash on Saturday. March
2, 1928 at 12 o'clock noon, the fol
lowing described real estate situ
ate in No. 5 township. Cleveland
county and bounded as follows:
Being that tract of land convey
ed from Christopher Felmont and
wife to James K. Smith by deed
dated March 3, 1881. and recorded
in book MMM at page 61 in the
register’s office. Cleveland county
Lying on the waters of Buffalo and
adjoining the lands of Ira Erwin,
Thomas Smith, and others. Begin
ning on a Black Oak, R. M. El
liott’s corner, and runs thence N.
76 E. 112 poles to a rock and per
simmon tree; thence S. 32 E. 44 <
poles to a stake on school house
land; thence S. 59 >2 W. 16 poles to a
stake; thence S. 32 E. 10 poles to a
stake; thence S. 591* W. 29 2-3
poles to a stake; thence N. 69 W.
72 poles to a stake a-nd pointers; •
thence N. 81 W. 24 poles to the be
ginning, containing 22 \ acres
more or less. ,
The terms of the above sale are
cash on date of sale. The bidding
will begin at $65.62 per acre.
This the. 12th day of February,
1929.
PEYTON McSWAlN. Com.
m sum wakt ms
The Most Persistent Thief
OF YOUR PROFITS IS
HIGH INTEREST RATE
T—r easiest way to save
Is Through
LOW INTEREST RATES.
We Lend On Acceptable First Farm
Mortgages At Lowest Rate Of Interest
5 TO 35 YEARS 5\%
Nothing Complicated About It. Let
Us Tell You.
* - 4
Shelby National Farm Loan
Association
HENRY B. EDWARDS, Sec.-Trea».
21 Royster Bldg. Phone No. 673.
Jbr Econtmieal TranifortttUm
CHEVROLET/
1
m
National
Demonstration
Week!
Drive the
New Chevrolet Six
No matter how closely you inspect The
Outstanding Chevrolet of Chevrolet
History—you will never appreciate
what a wonderful achievement it is
until you sit at the wheel and drive.
So this week has been set aside as
National Demonstration Week, and
you are cordially invited to come in
and drive this sensational automobile.
Not only is the new six-cylinder valve
in-head* motor 32% more powerful,
with correspondingly higher speed
and faster acceleration . . . not only
does it provide a fuel-economy of bet
ter than twenty miles to the gallon—
but it operates with such marvelous
smoothness that you almost forget
there is a motor under the hood!
Regardless of the car you may now be
driving—come drive this new Chev
rolet Six. Come in today—and enjoy
the greatest motoring thrill you have
ever experienced!
-a Six in the price range of the four!
if £» ‘595 'll
The
Road* ter...
The
Phaeton ...
i
The
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The
Seolan
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*675
The Sport *AQC
Cabriolet
ThtConvcrt-tyytL
tbit Landau . •
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Ll«ht Delia- »4AA
ery Cbaealr..
m Too
Chaaoie
*545
mTonChaa-l/LEA
sUwilhCab.. j
A All price a /* o. b. fmetory, Flint, Audi. /
Crawford Chevrolet Co., Inc.
SUCCESSORS TO JORDAN CHEVROLET CO. SHELBY, N. C.
E QUALITY AT LOW COST
    

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