North Carolina Newspapers

    Let A Star Want Ad Sell It For You At Small Cost
1 _
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In the WANT ADS
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Charge For Any Want Ad 25e.
This size type 1 cent per word each Insertion
This size type 2c per word each insertion.
This size type 3c per word each insertion.
Ads that amount to less than 25c, will be charged 25c fox
first insertion.
t ____!
IP you ARE PLANNING TO
build, let us make an estimate.
Plans and sketches cheerfully sub
mitted. First class workmanship
guaranteed, Lowman Brothers, con
tractors, Phone 727-J. tf 18c
MEAT SCRAP FOR SALE,
finalizes 55 per cent protein. Excel
lent for hog and chicken feed.' $70
per ton. City Abattoir. Apply at
City HalL tf 7c
I HAVE SEVERAL
thousand dollars to
lend on improved
farms in Cleveland
county. See or write
Marvin Blanton, Led
better building, Shel
by. W-F-tf
SHELBY AUTO AND WAGON
Company, specialilzng in rebuild
ing wrecked cars, building commer
cial bodies, duco painting, top up
holstering and glass work. Black
smithing. Phone 753-J. South Mor
gan Street. tf 15c
HARMON & MOSS
Electrical Contracting
and Repairing* Locat
ed under Chocolate
Shop. Phones: Office
230. Res. 203. tf-25
A 1200 PAGE WEBSTER SELF
Pronouncing Dictionary for only
65c with a year’s subscription to
The Star. Better get yours now.
The dictionary is worth $3.50, the
paper all we ask for it; $2.50 per
year by mail or $3 by carrier in
Shelby and suburbs. tf
OLD NEWSPAPERS FOR
sale at The Star office. Twen
ty cents per hundred. Call at
the press room. tf-26x
WANTED: TWO GIRL BOAKD
ers who work at night. Location
convenient to Cleveland Cloth mill
and Eastside. Apply to Mull M.
Patterson, Fallston Road. tf lc
OATS'IN 50 BUSH
EL lots or more. Spe
cial prices. D. A.
Beam & Sons, Phone
130. 6t-lc
SMOOTHING HARROWS, DISC
harrows, plow stocks, turning plows
and all kind of farm machinery at
O. E. Ford Co.’s. 2t-5c
COTTON SEED: 1 1-16 INCH
lint. Cleveland Big Boll improved.
From heavy yield fields. Reclamed
sacked $1.25 per bushel. C. S. Young
Shelby. 4t lp
—WE ARE HAVING WONDER
FUL hatches and livability with
our chicks this year and can fur
nish each Wednesday fine Rocks,
Reds and Leghorns if order placed
in advance. Poultry bringing top
prices How and outlook for over a
year for high prices. This is the
year to go in for. poultry. Try But
tle chicks and be pleased. Suttle
Hatchery. tf-3c
FOR RENT: MODERN SIX
room bungalow on West Marion
street. Phone 518. Ralph Mauney.
3t 3p
CASH FOR Poultry
every day at top mar
ket. Our prices now
27£c for hens, 42c for
broilers. Bring us your
poultry any day. Shel
by Fe«d Co. 2t-5c
Cranes Vulcanizing
Plant, tires 30x3 and
30x3 l-2-$3.75. 6t-5p
THIS WEEK IS THE TIME TO
bed potatoes. Call at potato house
and get seed potatoes already treat
ed. Shelby Potato House, S. A. Ellis,
Manager. 3t 3c
BUILDING LOTS—GOOD Lo
cation. C. S. Young. tf-12c
ONE NINE ROOM HOUSE TO
rent on South LaFayette St. S. A.
Ellis. tf 3c
SEE O. E. FORD CO. FOR HAY
and oats at the right price. 2t-5c
Ice Boxes, Refrigera
tors, Electric Ranges
and oil Stoves, new
and used at bargain
prices, Arey Refrig
erating Co. 5t-3
A YEAR'S RENEWAL. AND 65c
gets a Websters Home, Office and
School dictionary containing 1200
pages and information everyone
should have. It is self pronouncing
and profusely illustrated. The Star,
Shelby. tf
OLD FLOORS MADE NEW—
and new floors neatly sanded. Have
most up-to-date machine in town.
For estimate of cost phone 39.
Frank M. Newton, 318 W. Marlon
street, tf 18c
FOR RENT—TWO OR THREE
rooms light, house keeping. Apply
409 North Washington street. 3t-5p
O. E. FORD Co. will save you
money on lime, cement and brick.
2t-5c
ONE SIX ROOM HOUSE FOR.
Desirable located. See H. Clay Cox
or W. A. Broadway. tf lc.
FOR RENT: FIVE ROOM
hohse on Broad Street. S. S, Roy
ster. 2t 50
EXPERIENCED HOUSEKEEPER
desires position. Call at Star '‘Of
fice. , tf-29c
VISIT WEBBERS SERVICE
station at the Log Cabin just above
Mooresboro. Barbecue, hot dogs,
groceries, gas and oils. Alma Web
ber, proprietor. 9t lp
FOR RENT, Eight
acres of land, part pf
Shelby Hospital tract.
Good land for cotton.
See A. P. Weathers,
trustee. 2t-5p
FOR RENT OR SALE: TEN
room house and lot on No. 18 east
of hospital. N. O. White, R-2,
Grover. 3t 5p
LOST: CLEVELAND SPRINGS
hotel Monday night at dance, Gold
Bulova watch. Initial E. G. M.
Finder please return to D. H. Cline,
receive reward. 2t 5c
FOR RENT: FURNISHED
rooms at Blue Parrot Inn, East
Warren street, telehhone 760. 3t 5c
TOMATO PLANTS FOR SALE:
Choice varieties. Mrs. Ralph G.
Hamrick, Shelby, Route 4 tl 5c
FOR RENT: I FOUR ROOM
apartment and one 7 room house.
Close in. West Graham street. Fred
W, Baber, Phone 701. 2t 5c
FOR SALE — ONE 1928
Pontiac. Coach,. One. 1924
Buick Coupe, One 1924 Buick
Sedan, One 1925 Nash Tour
ing,.One 1926 Pontiac Coach,
One 1928 Essex Coupe. A. B.
C. Motor Co., Arey Bldg. tf-5c
WASH CONNER WILL GRIND
your corn at T. F. Elliotts old wa
ter Mill on Hintons Creek. 6t 27p
FOR CHATTANOOGA TURN
ING plows and middle busters see
O. E. Ford Co. 2t-5c
SPECIAL PRICE ON OATS,
fresh car just unloaded. Special
price on flour. Shelby Feed Co. 3t 3c
O. E. FORD CO. WILL SAVE
you money on hay and oats. 2t-5c
LOST LAST MONDAY GREY
check overcoat with pair leather
gloves in pocket. Lost on highway
No. 20 near Blanton farm. Reward.
J. Y. Green, Boiling Springs. 2t-8p
LILACS AND WHITE IRIS
for sale. Gertrude Street, R-3,
Shelby. 2t-8p
RECITATION CONTEST AT
• BEAVER DAM APRIL 12TII
There will be a recitation con
test at Beaver Dam school house
Friday evening April 12, at 8 o'clock.
Admission free.
A sweet clover club has been or
ganized in Rutherford county with
30 farmers agreeing to grow a small
acreage this season. Limestone Is
beijng .used in tests of 100, 2000 and
3000 pounds to the acre to find the
best amount, ,. . . .
“GUS AND GUSSIE”
Of To A Finish
DEAR -lACK LAIT—
LET GllSSE
MARRV her
WRI6HT ROOT, JR.,
AND END THIS
ACONY_
GUS HAD HIS
CHANCE THESE
many Years .
Gussifc COU-D
never Love
I'M EXPECTING
WRIGHT IM A PEW
MINUTES* NOW IF
>bu TALK RODELV
TO HIM OR SPlU.
ANV SARCASTIC
CRACKS■
fine ,thanks*
The orchids
WONT TOO StT OOWN *.
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To Give me some important
News... AttOOT MV POTORC
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OUR. TWO-ACT AN*
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IMPORTANT NEWS
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My WIFE.
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BUT IP you RE
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A FORTUNE TELLER. »NJ
TUB SHOW WITH US
KNOW... OR SHE
COUL.DN' ee A
FORCHUNE TELLER.
COULD
Snow Scarcity Last Winter
Explained By Weather Man
Onr Climate Is Not Charging.
Snowy Winters Arc Coming
Again.
The outstanding feature ot the
weather so far this winter is the
absence of much snow. No, our
climate is not changing. Snowy
and cold winters will reappear with
mild open ones intervening, and the
averages in the long run will not
change.
Johnny has not had much op
portunity to coast because our
storms have not been coming from
the direction favorable for snow, or
at an opportune time.
In order to develop a good snow
storm In this lattitude, a cold wave
and a storm must be suitably con
joined. To understand this one
should be acquainted with the char
aoteristlcs of cold waves and storms
in the United States, says The
New York Times.
Uncle Sam prepares a daily
weather map showing the positions
of storms, cold areas, etc., over the
United States. Tills map is based
on telegraphic reports on the var
ious weather elements throughout
this country and adjacent terri
tory. After lines are drawn on the
map through^laces of equal air
pressure (barometer readings) the
areas where this pressure is lowest
are designated "low,” and where
highest they are marked “high.”
Areas Explained.
The low is technically called a
cyclone or disturbance and the high
an anti-cyclone. The low draws
mild, moist surface winds toward its
centre in a sort of giant spiral,
manner, in an anti-clockwise
movement; while the high thrusts
dry, cold wtids outward from Its
centre and downward from aloft in
a colossal clockwise spiral motion.
The low' Is usually accompanied by
cloudiness or rain over certain
quadrants of its area; cold, dry
weather is prevalent over most of
area covered by a high.
Thus we can see that if a low is
south of us we will have northerly
winds, remembering that the sur
face winds are drawn toward the
area of least pressure (lowest baro
meter.) Also if a high is nprth of
us we will experience dry, cold
northerly winds, for the winds are
being thrown outward from the
area of greatest pressure (highest
barometer).
It must also be understood that
these areas of low and high baro
meters have a progressive move
ment across the country as well as
their own local circulation of sur
face winds and that the low or
storm centre moves against the sur
face winds. For instance, a storm
producing a northeast wind here
moves toward us from the south,
but the upper clouds and winds
aloft move in the direction with its
progressive movement.
When lows move .from the south
up the Atlantic coast toward New
York, the winds become north or
northeast, and our chances for snow
or sleet are good if there is cold
enough weather to the north of us
to support It and if conditions aloft
are not inverted. that is, above
freezing at the level of the precipi
tation producing oiand below
freezing near the earth’s surface.
When lows move from our north
west over the Lake region and
down the St. Lawrence valley, or
up the Mississippi valley to the
Great Lakes and then down the St.
Lawrence, we have little or no
chance for snow, as southerly
winds are too warm. This is about
what has happened frequently this
winter.
When a combination of a. low
moving directly up the Atlantic
Coast and a high moving over the
Great Lakes act jointly, we have a
circulation of cold, dry winds from
the north out of the high into the
moist area of the low. Such a con
dition In winter results in heavy
condensation on a large scale in
the form of snow, with strong
w inds and a deep snow, and the
temperature will often fall rapidly
during the progress of the storm.
•‘The “Too Cold To Snow” Fallacy
On the other hand, if the high
over the Lakes or Ohio valley ex
erts too much pressure against the
low while it is near the Carolinas
it will force the storm too far out
to sea to produce precipitation here,
in which event we will experience
cold and threatening conditions.
Hence the expression "too cold to
snow,” which of course, is a fall
acy. Does it not snow in our north
west and northern New England
with the temperature far below
zero?
It was no other than Benjamin
Franklin who discovered that
northeast storms on the Atlantic
coast move up the coast from the
south. An important eclipse of the
moon was scheduled for a certain
date and Franklin had made prep
arations at Both Philadelphia and
Boston ti> make observations of the
phenomenon. Much to his disap
pointment, however, a northeast
rainstorm set in at Philadelphia
that night, completely upsetting his
observations.
As it was a severe storm and the
winds blew hard from the direction
of Boston (northeast) Franklin
gave up all idea that conditions
anywhere northeast of Philadel
phia would permit of visibility of
the eclipse, and made up his mind
that the preparations had all been
for naught. When communications
were established with Boston,
Franklin learned, much to his sur
prise, that the observation there
had been a complete success, the
sky being clear, but that the north
east storm had reached Boston the
next morning.
SHELBY CHILDREN PRAISED
FOR THEIR SACRIFICE
Mount Airy Times:
Our esteemed contemporary the
Cleveland Star relates that the high
school students of Shelby have sac
rificed their annual banquet In or
der to contribute the sum towards
keeping the schools in session. This
truly represents a wonderful spirit,
but it is doubtful if the sum of $100
will keep the Shelby high school
running, figuring on average op
erating costs, as long as the ban
quet would probably last.
[ Star Advertising Pays
Ivey Wellmon And Miss Elmer
Barnrtt Married. Personal
Items Of Interest.
(Special to The Star.)
Beam’s Mill, April 5.—The Peo
ple of the community are very
glad to see such beautiful weather,
for they are very anxious to start
their spring farming.
Mr. Ivey Wellmon and Miss El
mer Barnett, were married Satur
day afternoon.
Mrs. Albert Hamrick, and daugh
ter, Mae, and Miss Louise Patter
son, of Kings Mountain,-spent Fri
day night with Mr. and Mrs. Plato
Costner.
Mr. and Mrs. Chesley Hendrick,
spent Sunday with Mr. A. D. Spang
ler.
Mrs. Marshall Hendrick, who has
been spending several weeks with
friends In Kings Mountain return
ed home Friday.
Mr. Boyd Hendrick, has accepted
a position In Hickory.
Mr. Bay Wilson, and Miss Amer
ica Hendrick, spent Sunday after
noon with friends in Fallston.
Mr. Elvin. Barnette, of Bolling
Springs college, spent Easter holi
days with his parents.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Oliver Willis, and
Miss Aletha Hoyle, spent Easter
holidays with their parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Gaston Hoyle.
Mrs. A. D. Hamrick, has been
Report of the condition of
The PEOPLES BANK
at Waco, North Carolina to the
Corporation Commission at the
close of business on the 27th day
of March, 1929.
Resources.
Loans and discounts_$94,793.57
Overdrafts ...._ 54.74
United States bonds-- 1,800.00
Banking house_ 1,200.00
Furniture and fixtures -- 1,722.41
Cash in vault and amounts
due from approved de
pository banks __ 16,846.40
Total
116,417.12
Liabilities. __—
Capital stock paid in 6.000.00
Surplus fund_ 4,000.00
Undivided profits (net amt.) 166.83
Reserved for interest_ 502.20
Other deposits subject to
check __ 25,909.42
Cashiers checks outstand
ing . 8.38
Time certificates of deposit
(due on or after 30 dys) 80,830.29
Total .. 116,417.12
State of North Carolina,
County of Cleveland.
A. C. Beam, cashier, A. W. Black
director, and A. J. Putnam, direc
tor of the Peoples Bank, each per
sonally appeared before me this
day, and, being duly sworn, each
for himself, says that the foregoing
report i6 true to the best of his
knowledge and belief.
A. C. BEAM. Cashier.
A. W. BLACK, Director,
A. J. PUTNAM, Director.
Sworn to and subscribed before
mo this the 4th day of April, 1929.
DAVID P. DELLINGER,
Notary Public
My commission expires 12-8-29.
spending several days with Mr. and
Mrs. Worth Lattlmore
Miss Beatrice Hendrick, spent Fri
day night with Miss Bryte Cost
Messrs. Chivous Hoyle, and Oscar
Barker, ol Boone college spent the
week-end with Mr. Hoyle’s par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Gaston Hoyle.
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Hoyle. Misses
Verda and Connie Wright, and
Messrs Onley and Everette Wright
motored to St. Paul Sunday after
noon.
Misses Claudia Spencer, of Zion
community, and Willie McGill of
Kings Mountain, spent the week
end with Miss Aletha Hoyle.
Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Hoyle spent
Wednesday with Mr. and Mrs. Van
Turner, of Llncolntcn.
Misses Margaret and Allene,
and little brother C. B. Seism,
spent Sunday with Mrs. J. V. Elliott.
Miss Madeline Hoyle, of Rich
mond, Va., spent Thursday night
with Mr. and Mrs. Gaston Hoyle.
Mr. and Nf-s. Ed Grigg. of near
Lincolnton, spent the week-end
with Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Hoyle.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Oardner,
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs.
Virgil Oardner.
Governor Gardner Gets New Auto.
Raleigh, April 5.—The council of
state has purchased a new automo
bile to be used by the governor. It
replaces a car which has been driven
somewhat over 60,000 miles, Gover
nor Gardner said.
Report of the Condition of the
FARMERS AND MERCHANTS
Bank at Moore*boro, North Caro
lina to the Corporation Commission
At the Close of Business on the 27
day of March, 1929.
Resources.
Loans and discounts ... 9204,021.61
Overdrafts - —. 271.33
All other stocks and bonds 740.00
Banking house --4,483.27
Furniture and fixtures ... 4,346.95
Cash in vault and amounts
due from approved depos
itory banks -- 24,074.83
Other real estate_- 2,604.93
Expense . .. 1,139.19
TOTAL . .'.$241,083.11
Liabilities.
Capital Stock paid in-$26,500.00
Surplus fund . *-— 6.050.00
Demand deposits due
banks. 1,326.32
Other deposits subject to
check . 66,713.00
Cashiers checks outstand
ing . 228.12
Time certificates of deposit
(Due on or after 30
days) . . 130,864.62
Bills payable. 10,000.00
TOTAL.$241,682.11
States of North Carolina,
County of Cleveland, ss
Y. L. McCardwell, cashier, E. B
Hamrick, director, and A. I. Jolley,
director of the Farmers and Mer
chants bank, each personally ap
peared before me this day, and, be
ing duly sworn, each for himself,
says that the foregoing report is
true to the best of his knowledge
and belief.
Y. L. McCALDWELL, Cashier
E. B. HAMRICK, Director
A. 1. JOLLEY, Director.
Sworn to and subscribed before
me this the 6th day of April, 1929.
WILLIE V. GREENE,
Notary Public.
My commission expires April 27,
1930, --- „
SFINDALF. REACHES POINT
OF NEEDING PAVEMENTS
Rutherfordton, April 5.—The
town of Spindale has announced
that It wilt receive bids until April
16 for street paving. Bpindale claims
the largest population of any town
*
In Rutherford county; it needs
some new paved streets, and will
have them before many months roll
by.
If the fafet^r wants to get a good
price for his cotton, he must cut
down the supply.
Learn More About
The Dairy Cow
it will pay you
Prosperity and contentment follow as
surely behind the dairy cow as does night
the day. That’s been proved over and over
again in other sections of the country.
This is the season of the year to begin
preparations for keeping a dairy herd. We
advocate starting with a few cows after
you have grown feed for them on your own
farm, and then gradually ii\preasing as you
gain experience in handling them.
You can always find a good market for your
dairy products with us. Call and let us
tell you about it.
We pay highest prices. We are in a strong
financial position. No need for worry
about your pay.
Every Cream Patron gets a Square Deal at
The
Shelby Creamery Co.
SHELBY, N. C.
    

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