North Carolina Newspapers

    Let A Star [Want Ad Sell It For You At Small Cost
1
Rates For Want Advertisements In This Column. Minimum
Charge For Any Want Ad 25c.
This sue type 1 cent per word each tnserUon
_ This size type 2c per word each insertion.
This size type 3c per word each insertion.
Ads that amount to less than 25c, will be charged 25c for
first insertion.
1 IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO
build, let us make an estimate.
Plans and sketches cheerfully sub
mitted. First class workmanship
guaranteed, Lowman Brothers, con
tractors, Phone 727-J. tf 18c
FOR SALE—6 ROOM BRICK
home, Julian Hord home, on N
Washington St., close in, good lot,
fine shade, this is an opportunity
to own your home. Terms to suit
you. Phone 70. J. B. Nolan Co. lt-21c
I HAVE SEVERAL
thousand dollars to
lend on improved
farms in Cleveland
county. See or write
i Marvin Blanton, Led
better building, Shel
by. W-F-tf
FOR SALE—78 3-8 ACRES, F. \V
McMurry farm, 1-4 mile Lawndale,
50 acres in cultivation, 3 houses,
good well at each home, 3 good
springs, wood, orchard and pasture.
Only $75.00 per acre. If interested
call or write us. J. B. Nolan Co.,
Shelby. lt-ilc
FOR SALE: 5 ROOM BUNGA
low. Modern improvements. Jeffer
son street. See C. A. Morrison. tt29c
- BUILDING CONTRACTOR
Work will be appreciated. H. J.
Costner, Phone 67-J. tf 8c
-/=-—
FOR SALE: 40 ACRES ADJOIN -
Ing land John Peeler, M. G. Car.
ipe, known as C. S. Lee farm. 8
room house, good road and fine lo
cation, one mile to Lawndale. Price
reasonable. J. B. Nolan Co. It 2lc
FOR RENT: THREE ROOM
apartment. Close in. Gnlfin P.
Smith. tf 5c
FOR SALE: 60 H. P. CONTIN
ental motor, one Liddell pony spe
cial saw mill. Plenty power for gin
ning outfit. Practically new. See
Cbevia Washburn at Cleveland
Hqgiware Co. 5t 9c
PROMPT SER
YICE on monthly or
, semi-annual loans on
good residential and
business property.
Marvin Blanton, Led
better building. Phone
634. 6t-10c
WANTED: PEELED PINE POLES
for creoeoting. For specification
and prices yrite Taylor-Colquitt
Co., Spartanburg, S. C„ or our local
representative H. F. Killian, Gilkey
N. C. 12 7p
HELLO BOYS! DO YOU LIKE
Texaco gas and oil? And good cold
drinks. If you do stop at the first
•tation from Shelby just outside of
the city limits on highway 20 and
*et the best of services and ice cold
drinks. Nickel BUI. 4t 14p
0
CARS WASHED
and Greased; also
storage. Texaco pro*
ducts. Temple Service
Station rear Masonic
Building, Phones 774
796. tf-lOc
, SHELBY AUTO AND WAGON
Company, specialilzng In rebuild,
tog wrecked cars, building commer
cial bodies, duco painting, top up
Bolstering and glass work. Black
amlthing. Phone 753-J. South Mor
gan Street. tf 15c
FOR SALE- Sweet
feed, corn, hay, and
special prices on feed
bats few cane seed
and cow oeas. Phone
130 D. A. Beam 6t-21c
We Have An Empty
truck' goincr to Atlanta
June 25 th or 26th.
Will be able to
from one to 6,000
pounds. Mo**rison
Transfer Co. ^Kn^e
Ym. 2t-i9c
MEAT SCRAP FOR SALE,
analizes 55 per cent protein. Excel
lent for hog and chicken leed. $70
per ton. City Abattoir. Apply at
City Hall. tl 7c
FOR RENT: SIX-ROM BUNGA
low on West Marion street. Ralph
Mauney, Phone 518. 3t 171
WANTED JOB AS TRUCK
driver. Write "Truck'' care of The
Star. 6t 19p
FOR SALE; 120 ACRES AT
Grover, the Dr. Oats farm, 2 houses,
timber, adjoins O. Max Gardner
and main line Southern R. R. Will
make bale cotton per acre, also
house and lot in Grover. Priced to
sell. J. B. Nolan Co. It 21c
FOR RENT; ONE 9-ROOM
house on S. LaFayette St. S. A.
Ellis. tf 13c
FOR RENT: 5 ROOM HOUSE,
with all conveniences. Location
Hillcrest. Call 561 or 653-J. 3t 19c
FOR RENT-ONE 5
room house, apply C.
S. Young. tf-c
mmw
TO FIGHT WEEVIL
Chester. S. C.—What is said
to be one of the most forward
and progressive steps to be tak
en in an effort to combat the
ravages of the boll weevil in
Chester county has been made
by the National Exchange Bank,
of this city, where in a full time
man, R. F. Palmer, of Bradley,
S. C., a graduate of Clemson
college who has specialized in
boll weevl control, has been em
ployed by this battfc. TUs duties
will be to advse and assist farm
ers in this territory, wthout cost,
in applying intelligent control
measures to the cotton fields
where this service is needed.
“A lot of time, effort and
money,” Ralph W. Coarsey,
Chester county demonstration
agent stated, "has been wasted
in the past through applying
poison where it is not needed
and in putting the poison on
in an effective manner. If the
farmers will cooperate in this |
project it will be the largest
demonstration of this kind ever
attempted in this section,, and
its successful operation holds
out more promise of effectively
meeting the boll weevil situation
than anything before attempted.
The man selected for this work
is a graduate of Clemson col
lege, who has been specially
trained In boll weevil control
work and his employment Tn
Chester county will prove a val
uable asset to the agricultural
interests of the county.”
Sunday School Picnic
At Boiling Springs
(Special to The Star )
A big dinner will be served on
the grounds at Boiling Springs the
fifth Sunday in June. The occasion
will be a joint meeting of all ;he
Sunday schools in that section. E.
P. Jenkins of New House has
charge of the meeting.
The dinner will be served by the
local folks and alsb those who come
for the meeting from these various
churches.
44 COUNTIES CO-OPERATE
IN FIRE CONTROL WORK
Raleigh.—Addition of Warren ai d
Washington counties will bring the
list of North Carolina counties hav
ing agreements with the state de
partment of conservation and de
velopment for forest fire control
work to 44, July 1, State Forester J.
S. Holmes has announced.
This will' bring the total to the
highest ever coming under the state
organization, Mr. Holmes said, and
represents an increase of more than
one third over the total of 32 coun
ties co-operating with the conserva
tion department a year ago,
Alexander county, which has been
working under a short-term agree
ment with the state department, lias
also been reported to have renewed
its work for next year, the forester
said and Jackson county has re
newed its agreement. Caldwell end
Hoke counties will make lage ap
propriations available for an in
creased scope of the work.
Try Star .Wants Ads.
“GUS AND GUSSIE”- Gu*’U Make It A One Way Trip, Too
Wftl«HT ROOT, JR.,
AMD eus Because
THE MILLIONAIRE
' IS ClVEN "IRE
•'MOVE ONi *
WHEN HE KNOCKS
ON GUSSIE S
DRESSIN©
room door —
■ ' stv.
/1 tell vtou >
A<3AlN, MR, ROOT.
IP vOU OOM' <30
quietly,You’ll
<3ET THE BOZOfe
v RUSH- J
I HAVE A NOTION
TO THRASH >t>U,VOO ] SAV THAT
IMPERTINENT LITTLE I TO ME
SWMIPPERSNAPPSR — J OOTS'OB ,
AS BlQ AS
TOO ARE —
/ COME OUT AH'CALL
E*S*J l ME PERlMPETENT
4 V SNAPPERWHIPPER
KEV— CUT OUT
TWS DOG WOW-T
IN PRON-T OF My
DOOR.* I MUST
RELA* ©ETWECN
PERFORMANCES
ow, ousste,
I OON'T WANT
TO ALARM OR.
WETURft VOO
1 ONLV WANT
TOU
X
kNr
Interference
fRU9MT ROOT, JR.,
STALKS OUT OF
THE MANCAR INN
VWBM <3uSSiE
RSFUSSS TO
<SlVS HIM A
HBARIHS AMO
ous threatens
Tto punch him
• IN HIS STYLISH
EVES
vbu havent
HEARD THE
LAST OF THIS -
>vn yop
'Tbu —
tWVPKtmMHMT
>ER.SWAPPeR.~
HE’S RIGHT—
WHAT UCBSJSE
HAVE VtDU OOT
TO IMTBRPERE
HIM
OM/RA8y'» UST6MAT
HBR — SHE LOCK'S HERSELF
iM FROM HtM,WW*W HE K/SJOCKS
SHE DON' ANSWER. ,WMCM
SHE COMES OUT SHE HANDS
HIM “THE ICE AN' QiVES
HIM “TUB AIR ——
AN' I'M
INTERFERIN'
That's MV ©ustwess
>M0 WHAT’S MV
Copeland’s HEALTH TALK
£ Watch Flat Feet
By ROYAL S. COPELAND, M. D.
(United States Senator and former Health Commissioner of
New York)
(Inquiries may be addresed to Dr. Copeland, care The Star, Shelby,
fi. C. If you dtslre a personal reply, enclose a stamped envolepo.e ad
dressed back to you.)
Anything that interferes with the natural and free use of the foot
in walking is bound to cause all manner of disagreeable symptoms. If
your foot is thrown out of its natural position, strain is bound to be
the result. Such strain is capable of causing pain extending anywhere
irom me 1001 uaeif mrougn me leg ana mia me
back.
Many a person has believed himself to be
suffering from rheumatism, or even some sort
of kidney or spinal trouble, when these organs
and parts are really perfectly normal. He Is
merely paying the penalty of walking on a foot
which has become too weakened in certain parts
of its delicate structure to perform its function
properly.
Flat-foot is the name given this trouble. It
is a displacement of the bones of the foot which
receive the weight of the body when standing
or walking. As a result the arch of the foot is
depressed or flattened.
Qg. CUt'tUVNB, mere are many causes or this condition.
" Chief of these are improperly fitted shoes. They
may be shoes with excessive high heels, or narrow or short shoes, or
shoes which do not give necessary support to highly arched insteps.
Another cause is the turning of the feet outward in walking. Weak*
cned muscles and ligaments due to exhausting illness, poor health, old
age, rapid growth in a child, overweight prolonged standing on hard
floors, corns and bunions and spe
cific diseases—all these are factors
in producing flat-foot.
The first measure to take in the
treatment of flat-foot is to get prop
erly adjusted shoes. These should
have broad, low heels and ample
space for the toes.
Everybody should cultivate correct
attitude in standing and walking.
The sufferer from flat-foot should
throw the weight of the body fre
quently upon the outer side of the
feet while standing. He should walk
with the feet held parallel and
pointed forward with the weight cn
the outer side.
The third thing to do is to prac
tice tip-toe exercises twice daily. The
sufferer stands with the toes point
ed inward, and slowly raises and
lowers himself upon the toes, de
scending with the weight on the
outer side of the heels.
If these measures do not give i»
lief it will be necessary to strap the
root with adhesive plaster or to
place it for a time in a cast or to
use mechanical appliances. Your
doctor or the specialist will advise
i’ou regarding such treatment.
Even after the condition has been
corrected from flat-foot must give
close attention to the selection and
[it of his shoes and to the cultiva
tion of a proper attitude in stand
ng and walking. He must do this if
le is to avoid a return of the trou
jle. *
Henry H. Q—Can Anything be
ione to stop one from growing?
A—No.
X. C. Q.—What do you advise foi
pimples and blackheads?
A.—Correct the diet, by cutting
down on sugar, starches and coffee.
Avoid constipation.
Mrs. G. M. Q.—What can be done
for a neurasthenic patient—would
constipation be a factor in any way?
A.—This condition can be improv
ed by correcting the constipation
and by improving the health in gen
eral.
T, w. Q.—What is the cause of
ringing the ears?
A.—This is often due to nasal
[ catarrh which has extended into the
'inner ear. This can be cured with
proper treatment. A nose and throat
spary is beneficial.
Miss L. F. Q.—What should a
girl weigh who is 16 years old and
4 ft. 11 ins. tall?
2.—How can I gain weight?
A.—For her age and height she
should weigh about 107 pounds.
2.—Proper dieting is the secret.
You should eat nourishing foods and
have plenty of sleep and rest. Deep
spray is beneficial.
Ann&bell. Q.—What causes twitch
ing below the eyelid?
A.—This may be due to nervous
ness. First of all try to remove the
nervousness. It would be wise to
have your eye# examined.
Hiding behind a woman’s skirts
is another time honored phrase that
4as lost its application.
Uncle Sam Tight
Fisted To Some
Of His Employees
$Z.500-A-l’ear Workers Most Put
Up Big Bonds. Some Employe
Bonds Bun High.
Washington. — Foreign nations
sometimes think of good old Uncle
Sam as tight-fisted, and so do some
of good old Uncle Sam’s employes.
The government worker getting
$2500 a year who has to put up •
bond of $100,000 and who, in addi
tion to carrying responsibility for
large sums of money, has to pay
for the bond from his own pocket,
probably is one of those who does.
The bonding charge may deprive
him of his vacation money and he
has to keep his bond renewed.
Many federal employes are not
bonded, but perhaps as many as
150,000 are. and although a few
have to put up a bond of $100,000
each one has to shell out money
for a bond which benefits only the
government and the surety com
panies. There’s a bill in congress
which would make Uncle Sam pay
the fee, but no one ever does any
thing about it.
Some Bonds Run High.
The government has about 500,
000 bonds in force, a majority them
to insure the performance of con
tracts. The principal of these bonds
run all the way from $50 to $10,*
000,000 and the navy department,
on a ship building job, has exacted
a bond as high as $15,000,000.
Fidelity bonds, covering employes,
run as high as $200,000. About 100,
000 persons in the postal service
are bonded, including postmaster!
whose bonds run all the way from
$5000 to $100,000. In accordance with
the amount of money they handle,
and mall carrier and clerks, whose
sureties range from $500 to $2000 or
$3000.
Until 1894 the government had to
accept bonds from individual guar
antors Instead of from corporations
and in that year there was about
$50,000,000 in accumulated claims
against individuals who had gone
bond for public servants and had
disappeared or been found to be
insolvent. Congress gave the busi
ness to surety companies and today
competition between them Is so
keen that several keep girls hang
ing around the White House to get
each new list of nominations as
fast as they come from the presi
dential offices, so the companies
may go after the appointee for his
bond business.
All government bonding Is hand
led through the section of surety
bonds In the treasury, the chief of
which is Thomas L. Lawrence. This
section is a clearing house for all
bonds and it is Lawrence's Job to
see that all surety companies doing
government bond business are fi
nancially strong. He has an ap
proved list of 94 companies from
vhicb the treasury will accept
bonds. Last year Lawrence made
tour companies refinance, under
penalty of losing all business with
federal appointees.
About 200.000 bonds a year are
taken. The largest one was for $7,«
900,000, covering construction work
on the new department oi com
merce building, The government
customarily takes a 60 par cent
bond on all Its contract work. Con*
tractors, of course, make the”iov
emment pay the bonding costs, by
including them in the original bid
under one heading or another. Na
turally so. The contractor on the
commerce building, for example, had
to pay more than 9160,000 for his
bond.
The underpaid federal employ*,
of course, can't get out of paying
his.
Except in a very few cues where
it runs up to $2.50 it costs a dollar
par $1000 of aurety to be bonded.
Thou affected include all persons
disbursing money or having the cus
tody of money or property. None of
the cabinet members hu to give
bond, but all under them are held
accountable for whatever money or
property they handle.
Try Star Want* Ad*.
--- ■ I ■' "" 1 I1"1-"!
Had To Soil. i
Oxford, Md.—With the body erf hi*
father aboard, John Elliott, 13, who
had never before been in a sailboat,
made port after an all day struggle
with a sloop. Hls father. James
H. T. Elliott of Vienna, Md., died
on the first trip of a new craft.
A man in London the other day
got arrested for cussing In a show.
Many of us probably have seen that
same show.
Prints Tell The Story
Of Chic
|
« <y-d
injf
SEE THE NEW ARRIVALS THIS
WEEK
Prints have come to hold a definite place in fashion.
They are firmly entrenched in favor. Bows, Scarfs,
Pleats play their part in the Chic that is new f6r mid- *
summer. Scores of the smartest new styles just ar
rived this week. Let us show them to you.
NEW WASH SILK
AND CREPE
DRESSES
We have just unpacked countless numbers of these
charming Wash Silk Dresses. Yo.u/ll want several for
the season. Come in this w^ek.
NEW FELTS
See the new summer felts
just arrived. All the new
shades in white, maize, or
chid, tan and blues.
\ Men’s and Boys’
(SUITS
New Summer Styles and
Colors.
Wright-Baker Welcomes
Your Charge Account.
WRIGHT-BAKER CO. s
107 N. L&F&yette St. — Shelby, N. C.
■■ -___________'
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view