North Carolina Newspapers

    At The Theatres
"Keep your chin up!" That vvai
the psychology 'Chico ’ taught u
"Diane” in ‘ 7th Heaven.” and tli<
idea Is belt s caiTied out by Dircot.o:
Frank Borzage again with Charles
Farrell and Janet Oaynor in theii
picture, “Lucky Star.” which bejln:
a two day engagement today at tb<
Princess theatre.
In their present Fox feature, Far
rell once more is the teacher, Mis:
Gaynor the student. Her firs
glimpse of him is while he is hlgi
abdve her working on a telephone
me. Here he battles the line bos
lor one of her misdeeds—cheating
The Webb has booked for three
days this week—Monday. Tuesdav
and Wednesday, one of the mosi
popular of the current season
shows—“The Cocoanuts.” This is
an exceedingly popular musical
comedy hit transferred to th*1
screen. It Is played by a cast 'ha'
includes the celebrated Mark
Brothers—four 01 them—the best
known comedy quartet in the busi
ness. Beautiful and renowned Mary
Faton Is also In the cast, as Is Oscar
Shaw. It's a Paramount picture, and
will probably be accorded as glad a.
reception as any show Webb eve •
ran.
Finding his fathfcr's loaded e
volver. Walter Osborne, 3, of St.
Louis, pulled the trigger and his
left hand was shot off.
DEPOSIT
BY MAIL
The farmers of Cleveland
are busy—the fields are
white with cotton, its a bij?
job to keep up with the
picking, everybody is busy
,*—too busy to come to town.
SO—
JUST MAIL
YOUR COTTON
CHECKS
TO US
We will credit your ac
count and mail you a du
plicate of the deposit. Don’t
hold checks—mail them if
you are too busy to come.
THE
CLEVELAND
BANK & TRUST
CO.
Shelby, N. C.
Pe iny Column
O E. FORD CO. WILL SAVE
you money on seed and feed oats
31 21c
LOST N. C. LICENSE NO
371770 and tail light. Reward if re
turned to J. H. Southards, Dover
Mill. 3t-21p
FOR LIME, CEMENT AND
brick call O. E. Ford Co. 3t 21c
SIX ROOM RESIDENCE FOR
sale. D. A. Tedder. 2t 21c
FOR SALE—FORD ROADSTER
I in good condition, cheap. Evans
j Eddins. Shelby, Route 8, near
| Quinns Spring, 3 miles north of
Shelby.
PLENTY OF SEED OATS AND
good fertilizer at O. E. Ford Co.'s.
3t 23 c
FOR RENT: BUILDINO NEAR
Eastslde Mill suitable for Cafe and
Service Station, and new modern
Service Station on Highway 20
near city limits, both very desir
able locations. Royjtcr Oil Com
pany, Shelby, N. C. 3t Sic
IMPROVE YOUR LAND BY
sowing It down this fall with one of
O. E. Ford Co’s grain drills. 3t 21c
LOST BETWEEN LAKE LURE
and Cleveland Cloth Mill brow i
bill folder, containing *18. Reward
if returned to Star office. 3t 21p
STRAWBERRY AND RASP
berry plants for sale; also a few
choice grape vines and peach tree-;.
D, A. Tedder, Ptg>ne 649, 24 21c
__^__
WANTED TO RENT A TWO
horse farm: the farm is on Bcason
Creek between Shelby and King?
Mountain. I will furnish stock. W
S. Fortenberry, Shelby, N. C„ R-l,
Near St. Paul Methodist church.
2t-21p
FOR WAGONS AND FARM
trucks see O, E. Ford Co. 3t 21c
WANTED TO SELL ONE FORD
roadster, 1926 model In good run
ning condition. Will S Fortenberry,
Shelby. N. C., R-l. near St. Paul
Methodist church. 2t 21p
JUST RECEIVED AT O. E. FORD
Co's a car of seed and feed oats.
3t Ulc
THE VAUGHN QUARTET,
j Radio, Columbia and Victor Record
■ Artists, will be heard in concert at
Lattimore high school building.
Wednesday night, October 23 at 8
o’clock. Yqu will miss a treat If you
fail to hear them. Admission 20 and
35 cents. 2t 21 p
--—tyegrtpM
Plain Talk.
"Dear Mester Johnson: I got
your letter about what I owe you,
Piece wait. Whun some fpols pay
me I pay you. If this was Judgment
day and you wus no more prepared
to meet your Master as I am to
meet your account, you sure would
have to go to hell. Trusting you
will do this, ! am yours truly.
SIMON SLADE
I
Radio ,
L^Tt he Screen-Grid Atwater
Kent tell you its own story.
I^t it tell you today. Listen to
this set that has revolutionized
radio. Know what real tone,
power and selectivity are.
Revel in radio perfection—at
a moderate price.
$169.50
COMPLETE
Com ANIENT TERMS
Iware Co.
. “WE SERVE TO SATISFY. '
PHONE 330 _SHELBY, N. C.
Shelby Hard
SOCIETY
News
MISS MAVME ROBERTS—Social Editor—Phone 256.
New* Items telephoned Miss Roberts util Bo Appreciated.
I.aFayette
P. T. A.
The LaFayette street school Par
ent-Teachers association will meet
Tuesday evening at 7:30 o’clock.
Cecelia
Music Club.
The Cecelia Music club will r.ieet
Thursday 3:30 p. m. with Miss
Mayme Roberts at her home on N.
Morgan street.
Evening
Division Of Club.
The evening division of the Worn,
an’s club meets at the club room
Friday evening at 8 o'clock.
Ilridgr ,
Club.
The Tuesday afternoon bridge
club meets with Miss Millicent
Blanton Tuesday afternoon at 41
o'clock at her home on W. Marion
street.
Play "
Success.
The play “Dollar Bill,” presented
at the auditorium Friday night by
the Music and Arts department of
the Woman’s club was a great suc
cess and fifty-three dollars was
realized after all expenses.
Banquet At
Wayside Inn.
Mesdames Alice Boland end Tom
Abernethy gave a lovely banquet at
the opening of the Wayside Inn 0:1
East Warren street Friday night
honoring the members of the Amer
ican Legion auxiliary. On Saturday
they had as their guests, Dr. and
Mrs. Zeno Wall, Dr. and Mrs. H. K.
Boyer and Rev. and Mrs. H. N. Mc
Diarmid.
Dinner
Party.
Miss Attle Bostic gave a delight
ful dinner party Saturday at the
Gateway Hotel at Rutherfordton
honoring Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Esk
ridge on their second wedding an
niversary. A four course dinner was
served and covers were laid for Mi
and Mrs. Eskridge, Mr. Sam Austell,
Mrs. Nick Sanders and Misses
Bertha and Attie Bostic.
Dinner
Party
Dr. and Mrs. F. H. Jacfcey fnd
Mr. and Mrs. A, A. Lackey of Fftll
ston delightfully entertained with a
dinner party Wednesday evening of
last week at the Hotel Charles hon
oring Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Elkins who
were married two weeks ago at
Fallston and returned last wc<jk
from their wedding trip to relatives
in Virginia. A four course dinner
was served to the following: Mr
and Mrs Elkins, Mr. and Mrs. R. A
Lackey, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Lsrckey,
and Dr. and Mrs. Lackey.
Mias Ketchen '•~r
Lectures. i
A large crowd of club women
greeted Miss Ketchen of Winthrop
college Saturday afternoon at the
club room and heard her splendid
lecture on ‘‘Modern Poetry.” Miss
Milllcent Blanton, president of the
Contemporary Book club In a very
graceful manner, introduced the
speaker, who had been invited by
the book club to speak to the wom
en of Shelby. After the lecture, a
social half hour was spent and tea
and sandwiches were served.
Mrs. Nix Entertains
Chicoras.
The pretty new home of Mrs. W
B. Nix on North Morgan street was
most attractively arranged with
autumn leaves and cosmos Friday
afternoon, when Mrs. Nix was a
gracious hostess to the members of
the Chicora club. Interesting papers
on the subject of study for the aft
ernoon were given by Mesdames W.
F. Mitchell, O. M. Buttle and P. L
Hennessa.
During the social hour, the Jiost
css was assisted by Mesdames T. W.
and E. B. Lattimore. J. Y. Irvin and
Miss Lucile Nix in serving delicious
ice cream, cake and candy, follow
ed by cheese straws and coffee.
Garden,Club
Suggestions.
The garden club is asking every
property owner to plant pink crepe
myrtles on the street in front of
their homes or elsewhere on their
premises.
If you are not asked personally,
to do this, please phone to the fol
lowing ladles, who will tell you
where you may get these shrubs
very reasonably: Mesdames E. B.
Uttimore, J. A. Liles. S. S. Roya
ler. W. H. Blanton, John McClurd,
S. J. Thompson, T. W. Hamrick, J.
W. Suttle, H. E. Waldrop, C. F.
Sherrill. R. M. Laughridge, and
Miss Nora Cornwell. It is hoped
there will be a general res pony to
this request. Let’s make Shelf,y a
really crepe-myrtle town, it gows
to perfection here and in a few
fears we will be o"o>ih of our Ueau
liful streets.
Mrs. Suttle
Hostess.
Mrs. J. A. Suttle was a delightful
hostess to the Twentieth Century
club, Friday afternoon, entertaining
at her home in Belvedere park. This
hospitable home was decorated wLli
gorgeous dahlias of different colors.
A very interesting program was
given, Mrs. R. T. LeGrand read a
paper on, ‘ The Negro in America."
Mrs. George Hoyle, “Foreigners in
America" and Mrs. C, R. Hoey dis
cussed “Bolshevism in America”
Following the program, the hostess
was assisted by her daughters,
Misses Betty and Nancy Suttle, Mps
dames Will and J. D. Lineberger
and Lewis Forney, in serving a
chicken salad course with coffee,
stuffed oranges and fudge cake.
Mrs. McCurry
»Gives Luncheon.
The attractive apartment of Mrs.
Ed McCurry in Belvedere was
cleverly arranged, with beautiful
dahlias, cosmos and halloween sug
gestions, Saturday morning, when
Mrs. McCurry gave a three course
bridge luncheon honoring Miss
Lula Moore Suttle, a bride elect
and the Contract Bridge club. The
tallies table, markers and also the
sandwiches emphasized the hallov,
een season. Miss Suttle was pre
sented with Madiera napkins. The
top score prize went to Mrs. Bre
vard Hennessa, the second high t >
Mrs. Frank. Kendall and the visitors
prize was won by Mrs. Evan Glenn.
Mrs. McCurry was assisted in re
ceiving and serving by Misses Bet
ty Suttle. Jene Davis and Mrs.
Jimmie Blanton.
Out-of-town guests were Miss
Jene Davis and Mrs. Evan Glenn o'
Gastonia.
Mils Suttle
Honored.
Miss Lula Moore Suttle who will
be married Saturday at high noon
to f^r. Newton Farnell at the First
Baptist church was delightfully
honored Saturday when Mesdames
Wilbur Baber and Ben Suttle en
tertained Jointly at the Gibbs
apartment on W Warren street
Quantities of lovely dahlias and
cosmos were used as decorations.
Miss Suttle, beautifully gbwned in
brown chiffon velvet and corsage of
rosea was Resented with a hand
some piece of linen. The hostesses
were assisted by Mesdames Jap But.
tie and John McClurd in serv'ng a
chicken salad course with acces
sories.
The guests included. Misses Vir
ginia Hoey, Isabel Hoey, Mary
Branfft- Switzer, Minnie Eddius
Roberts, Elizabeth McBrayer, EH -
ty and Nancy Suttle, Mesdames
Jean, John and Hal Schenck, Henry
Edwards, H. S. Plaster, Paul Webb.
jr„ Vick Wray and Ed McCurry.
No. 1 Division
Meet.
The No. 1 division of the Woman’s
club held their regular meeting at
the club room, Thursday afternoon
at 3:30 o’clock with Mesdames W.
L. Wright, Wm Crowder, R. E.
Carpenter and J. A. Ellis, as host
esses. The members responded to
the roll call with quotations from
Southern Writers. The subject, “A
Study of Women Writers of the
SoutK” was announced by Mrs.
Basil Goode, who was the program,
leader. The club first sang together,
"Maryland, My Maryland”, after
which Mrs. J. A. Liles read a sketch
of the writers of "Maryland, My
Maryland’’ and "The Bonnie Blue
Flag.’’ Mrs. Ruth Thompson played
a piano solo. After which Mrs. Nix
read a paper on, "The Sword of
Lee,” and concluded the program by
playing the variations of "The Bon
nie Blue Flag,” The hostesses serv
ed a delightful salad course with
sandwiches and coffee. A number
of visitors enjoyed this meeting.
Nolan-Huggin*
Announcements.
The following handsomely en
graved announcements and accom
panying cards reading as follows,
have been Issued:
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Hue
gins announce the marriage of their
daughter, Pauline, to Mr. Thomas
Dixon Nolan on Wednesday the
sixteenth of October, nineteen hun
dred and twenty-nine, Terra Alta.
West Virginia. At home after No
vember the first, Shelby.
The Nolan-Huggins marriage vas
very quiet, only the members of the
brides immediate family witnessing
the ceremony, which was solemnis
ed at the home of the brides par
ents. Immediately following the
ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Nolan lett
by motor for a short honeymoon
trip. The bride wearing a hand
some brown tweed suit with acces
sories to match. Mrs. Nolan Is the
youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
B. P. Huggins, and has a host of
friends both in Forest City and
Shelby, where she has been a pop
ular teacher 4n the high schools f»r
the past three years. Mr. Nolan is
a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Nolan,
and is a prominent and supcesiftl !
young business man, being a mem
ber of the Nolan real estate firm.
Mf. and Mrs. Nolan will go to house
keeping just as soon as their hand
some home in Cleveland Springs
Estate is completed.
Afternoon Division
No. 2.
Mesdames W. T. Alexander, Carl
Webb and Horace Grigg were joint
hostesses to the afternoon division
No. 2 of the Woman’s club Friday
afternoon at 3:30 o’clock at the club
room, which was decorated with a
profusion of autumn flowers, love
ly dahlias predominating. In the
absence of the leader, Mrs. Clyde
Short, the meeting was presided
over by Mrs. J. R. Robinson. The
program was opened with a piano
selection by Miss Ethel Elmore. The
subject of study - was, ‘'Theodore
Dreisser,” and papers were read by
Mesdames C. H. Harrill and Tal
madge Gardner. The meeting was
closed by Mrs. Knox Hardin, sing
ing “The Desert Song." The host
esses served sandwiches and Rus
sian tea.
The next meeting will be held on
October 31, instead of Oct. 24 as
scheduled. Special guests were Mes
dames J. F. Whlsnant and D. D
Pou.
Mrs. Everett Houser
Hostess.
• One of the most charming after
noon teas of the autumn season was
that given by Mrs. Everett Houser
Friday afternoon from 3:30 to 5:30'
o’clock at her lovely new home in
Cleveland Springs Estates. Miss
Margaret Anthony and Mrs. Rush
Thompson welcomed the guests on
their arrival at the front door. The
living room, which is one of the
most attractive of any of the new
homes, was artistically arranged
with baskets and vases of large
white and yellow chrysanthemums
and other fall flowers. Mrs. Houser
received her guests in a handsome
blue transparent velvet gown. She
was assisted in receiving by her
mother. Mrs. J. A. Anthony, who
was attired in a silver lace r.nd
purple velvet and her mother-hi
law, who wore a brown transparent
velvet with egg shell blouse. The
register was presided over by Mes
dames Bright Carrick and L. W
Gardner. Entertaining in the liv
ing room was Mrs. Clyde R. Hoev.
Directing the guests to the din
ing room were Mesdames Earl
Hamrick and Grady Lovelace. The
dining table was covered with a
lace fillet cloth and in the center
was a huge silver basket of gor
geous radiance roses.
Seated at either end of the table
pouring tea were, Mesdames Oliver
Anthony and Chas. Hoey. Serving
sandwiches, tea and cookies were:
Missels Isabel Hoey, Carobel Lever,
Mesdamcs Shovine Beam and Jelf
Council. Bidding the guests good
bye, was Mrs. Jean Schenck. The
guest list included two hundred an.I
seventy-five.
Four Brake* And Balloon Tires On
Latest Carriages For The
Infant.
Chicago.— Modern babies have
kept pace with the times in get*itig
their share of the luxuries and com
forts that invention and progress
has brought to everyone in the
world.
None of the Wardships of the In
fants of pioneer days are expe-i
enced by the baby of 1929 who rides
around in a carriage with four
wheel brakes and balloon tires.
The papoose would look at the
carriage of today and wonder /hat
this strange and fascinating vehicle
was all about for in the days when
Indians roved the plains the best the
little redskin ever had was a r'de
on mother's back.
The evolution of the baby carriage
is presented in an interesting ex
hibit at the American Furniture
Mart in Chicago. The progression in
stages dating back to the sixth cen
tury. B. C, from the crudest' to the
1930 models are illustrated and dis
played.
Research men have found evi
dences that some mode of peram
bulator was used for babies as far
back as the day of Hermes, mes
senger of the gods. A painting or.
an Etruscan vase in the Louvre
shows Hermes upon his return home
after stealing the oxen of Apollo,
baby Hermes is shown lying on a
little table with miniature wheels.
'Three people stand around him, two
of them women and one a man who
apparently had come to claim the
stolen oxen.
Ride In Shawls.
Modes oT moving babies about
varied but little years ago in various
countries. In Egypt when e child
was too young to walk, he was taken
out in shawls worn in front, in cack
or at the side by their mothers or
nurses—a custom still retained by
the -Arabs.
Ethopian babies rode in a basket
fastened to their mother’s back by
a band which passed over her fore
head; Japanese infants looked
through their dreamy eyes at the
world from the back of an older
brother or sister. Each child car
ried the next younger baby who
learned to hold on tight until he
was able to walk.
Peru babies were strapped in
cradles like those of Indian papoos
es; Eskimos placed their young in
mother’s high, wide boots; Italian
women carried the children in wick
er baskets balanced on their heads;
mountain mothers of Switzerland
placed tHeir babies in cribs which
were carried on top of the head
much after the fashion of women in
South Africa tribes.
A considerate father was the first
baby carriage manufacturer. Charles
Burton, an English lithographic ar
tist, came to America in 1848. When
his first son was bom. Burton built j
a light conveyance on small wooden J
wheels.
When he appeared oil the streets!
in New York city, the curiosity of
the crowds was-so great that ne real,
ized he had a valuable invention. He
returned to England where the in
terest was as great as in America.
Duke First Customer.
The Duke of Leinster was his first
customer and after other members
of the royal family purchased car
riages, the fad spread throughout
England. Later the news of the baby
carriage reached outside the coun
try. The Psha of Egypt sent to Eng
land for several carriages and from
that time on the business has grown
throughout the world and numer
ous manufacturers followed Bur-ton's
lead.
During the last two generations
the American baby Iras been blessed
w-ith comfortable wicker-woveh car
riages- having resilient springs, soft
and soothing upholstering and all
the other things which would arid
to “his majesty’s” comfort and
health.
Within the last two years there
has been a popular movement, espe
cially in the large eastern cities to
ward adaptations of the English per
ambulator. But it hp only been in
recent days that little snookums hr;
demoded four-wheel brakes and
balloon tires as part of his oi her
necessary carriage equipment.
That is why when the pride ?f the
household calls for his carriage, he
falls off quickly to sleep—he just
can’t resist it. ,
Couldn't Fool Them.
The Inspector of schools w"is n'aid
ing his rounds. At pne school lie
told the pupils he was going to give
them an intelligence test.
“Now close your eyes!" he in
structed. Then he made a noise li'e
the twittering of birds.
“Open your eyes!” he said.
“Tell me -what was I doing?”
“Kissing teacher!” came the tri
umphant chorus.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICK
Having qualified as administrator
of the estate of Roxanna Blanton,
deceased, late of Cleveland county,
N. C. tills is to notify all persons
having claims against the estate of
said deceased to exhibit them to the
undersigned at his home in La tu
rn ore, N. C., on or before the 21st
day of October, 1930, or this notice
will be pteaded in bar of their re
covery. All persons indebted to said
estate will please make immediate
payment. This October 21, 1929.
BOYD H. BLANTON, Adminis
trator of Roxanna Blanton, de
ceased.
PRINCESS Today & Tues.
GliIMN Willi A MS
HIDWIGA KlHHtR
jJ: * reft n
FRANK
BOR2AGE
-r WllUAM Fox frwmmtt
JANET 6AYN0R
CHAMBHMH1
i.i;cnv
STAIR
Being Featured At Leading Theatre of
Charlotte This Week. Don’t Miss This One.
BETTER VALUES THE YEAR ROUND
MEN S & BOYS’
WINTER
UNDERWEAR
Cotton, part wool
and wool. Light, me
dium and heavy
weight. White and
cream colored. You
cannot afford to buy
without seeing what
we have to offer.
BOYS 49c to 98c
MEN’S $1 to $1.49
MEN S AND BOYS’ SLIPOVER
SWEATERS
98c t0 $5.95
Plain and fancy patterns.
Light and heavy weight.
COAT SWEATERS
For Men and Women in
ail weights and all colors
$1.25t0 $5.95
MEN’S FLANNEL DRESS SHIRTS
Something brand new. Very light
weight flannel. The very thing for this
fall and winter. Several shades and
all collars attached..$2.25
BOYS’ 3-PIECE
SUITS
$4.95
Think of that! And
you’ll appreciate i t
even more when you
see them. Sizes 3 to
17.
NORTH POLE OUTING
10c Yd
27 inches wide. In light and dark col
ors.
COWBOY
OVERALL
PANTS
Made of heavy 8
oz. blue denim,
with wide knee &
bottom. 8 b e 11
loops and quarter
top pockets
$1.98
A. V. Wray & 6 Sons
ON THE SQUARE FOR TWENTY
YEARS.
— PHONE NO. 1 —
    

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