North Carolina Newspapers

    The Cleveland Star
SHELBY, N. (J. •
MONDAY — WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY
. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
By Mall, per year ___. e'J.txj
By Carrier, per year_.___r_ wuu
THE STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY. I NCI
LEE B WEATHERS____ President and Kdltoi
8. ERNES! HOEY ........___.._.... Secretary and foreman
RENN DRUM.„...... New* Editor
It. 8. OAIL _...___...__ Advertising Manager
Entered as second class matter January t, 1905 at tne postotttce
•t Shelby. North Carolina, under the Act of Congress, March 3. 1879
We wish to call your attention to the fact that tt is and nas oeen
our custom to charge five cents per line ror resolutions of respect,
cards of thanks 4nd obituary notices, after one death notice nas
been published. This will be strictly adhered to.
WEDNESD’Y, MAR. 18. 1931
TWINKLES
A whale should make a pood politician since the scien
tists inform that in places a whale’s skin is two feet thick.
With the people clamoring for Mahatma Ghandi and
Charlie Chaplin, Will Rogers says the day of the physical
big man has passed. Well, Will, isn’t it a miniature period?
An encouraging sign: A drive over rural Cleveland
county show’s more acreage in oats than in years. That is
just one of several indications that Cleveland farmers in
tend to live at borne in 1931.
There are many people, who never worked in their lives,
who hope that when some solution is found for the unem
ployment situation it will not be such a good solution as to
get them to work with the others who desire work.
tf there is anything Which should start the old-timers to
recalling bygone days and "remember whens” for the
"Around Our Town” column on The Star it should be the
present-day price of fatback, sugar and eggs. Lessee—how
long has it been since those commodities sold at prices pre
vailing now?
SEVENTY-SEVEN GOOD REASONS __
OPPONENTS OF THE NEW banking supervision measure
in the North Carolina general assembly are saying that
there is no real reason for changing the present method of
supervision.
Maybe not, but we are inclined to line up with The
Asheville Times and say that there arc at least 77 good reas
ons for a change. The 77 being 77 banks which closed in
North Carolina last year. Then multiply those 77 very good
reasons by the number of depositors who suffered, and add
to that total the many dollars, representing savings of a life
time, that were lost.
Lax supervision may not have been responsible in all
cases, but there seems to be an abundance of reasons for bet
ter supervision.
EXTRA TERM NEEDED
THOSE ACQUAINTED with the congested condition of the
Superior court docket in this county will readily agree
that the bill now in legislature asking for an extra term of
court in Cleveland county is one that should be enacted into
law. For a number of years the criminal docket and the civil
calendar in this county have become more and more congest
ed. On both, ft is our opinion, there are cases which should
have been disposed of a year or two years ago. Such has
been the increase in criminal cases that at recent terms the
court grind had to be given over almost entirely to disposing
of jail cases. As a result many cases carried over from pre
vious terms were carried over again with new cases added.
Nothing good can be said of a method that continues to de
lay court trials of any time. One of the major assets of a
court of justice is that of meteing out speedy punishment.
The other is the certainty of it. The extra term of one week
early each fall should help to a considerable extent in clean
ing up the local court books.
WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
LAST WEEK THOUSANDS of North Carolina farmers
swarmed into Raleigh to request a reduction in land
taxes. A number of speeches were made, but one speaker
failed to complete his talk. He was howled down. This
speaker, W. W. Neal, of Louisburg, made an uncompliment
ary reference'to A1 Smith, who had been in Raleigh only re-}
cently to say that Governor Gardner had the right idea about j
cutting down expenses in order to lower taxes. When Neal}
made his remark the big gathering of farmers shouted him j
down with a repeated “hurrah for A1 Smith.”
That incident caused The Spartanburg Herald, in the,
neighboring State of South Carolina, to become curious in
view of the fact that only two years ago North Carolina gave j
Hoover an 80,000 majority over Smith. What has been bap- j
pening, The Herald wonders, to bring about this change of I
sentiment? The possibility of a new viewpoint is seen by I
The Herald as follows:
They must think a good deal less of Hoover and a
good deal more of Smith in 1081. The farmer vote in
North Carolina is powerful still. Maybe they have con
cluded that a vote on economic issues and less concern
about liquor and the pope might have been more to the
point, seeing that neither the pope nor the 18th amend
ment helped save us last year.
NO GIVING GROUND HERE
IF EVERY SUPPORTER of prohibition were as uncompro
mising as Federal Judge E. Yates Webb, there wouldn't
oe any prohibition controversy, because the wets would be
emphatically informed once and for all that all efforts to re
peal the prohibition act would be wasted labor.
Always an ardent advocate of prohibition. Judge Webb
has given no ground and has weakened not at all. Prohibi
tion is here and here to stay. That’s what he tells nearly
every Federal court grand jury he talks to, and he says it in
such a manner that it is easy to understand and compre
hend. One by one he takes up the criticism and attacks of
the wets and terms the entire lot tommyrot and bosh. There
is as much reason to abolish the law against taking human
life, he says, because murders are still committed as to re-1
peal prohibition because the law is still violated. Many ot
our laws have been laws and regulations hundreds of years;
prior to prohibition, yet they arc violated today. But de-j
spite that violation they are not, and will not, be legalized. !
No halfway ground will do as Judge Webb sees it. State'
regulation or any other regulation of booze, he declares, is!
impossible and has been proven so.
“If barrooms were back, hero in Kings Mountain/ Gas
tonia and Charlotte, I would not dare drive my automobile
over the highway to Charlotte,’’ he declared. “I would be in
clined to take to the woods to save my life, and so would
every sensible man.’’
Around Our TOWN
Shelby SIDELIGHTS
By KENN UHIJM.
How long has the building now occupied by the Charles stores been
built?
John Wynn Daggett, then very much of a boy, hauled every brick
from Qaffney’s kiln In Frog Level. He used one team of horses, from
the Lattimore stables, and three wagons. One wagon was being*unloaded
all the time, one being loaded, and the other on the go.
If your mind flits back with ease to those days, see if you recall what
mason acted as foreman on the Job for Mr. John Lineberger?
Remember way back when boys slipped off on Sunday afternoons and
rocked lizards along zig-zag rail fences Instead of playing golf of caddy
ing?
Cleveland county will rival any county in number of family names
of color. In a recent issue of The Star two administrator's notices pub
lished side by side one executor was Peter White for the W. P. White
estate, and the other W. C. Black for the Eliza Green estate.
You’ve all read of double O McIntyre’s home town of Gallipolis, Ohio,
but how many of you know the correct pronunciation of the name?
Roy V. Crawford, entertaining Hickory Record columnist, broke Into
McIntyre’s column last Sunday by giving the correct pronunciation In the
following rhyme: "I have a friend who has a niece who fa the belle of
Gallipolis.’*
(As for us, knowing you're not interested; there fa a town in Cleve
land county, a small town but larger than our home town, which has
the same name as the village which spawned this tangle o’ type. Now
figure it out.)
Occasionally a farmer drops into the office with the remark “I read
after your writing in that colyum all the time.”
That’s encouraging news, and it might he well to say here that the
realm of the colyum Is not confined to the city limits of Shelby despite
the heading over it. Human Interest Items, freaks, etc., from any section
of the county will be welcomed. You see newly everybody In Shelby and
In the county are connected In one way or another. If you don’t be
lieve It, try to say something about somebody with at least three people
listening and in your embarrassment you'll soon learn that the person
talked about Is related to at least one of the trio listening.
And now we nre waiting on the contributions from the countryside.
A good ‘‘remember when" article could easily be written by some rural
resident recalling how Shelby looked when he of she shopped here ever
so many years ago.
Help, please! '
Shelby Shorts: Ruth Hopper and Carl Wray Webb are new entrants
In the handsome young man. handsome young lady contest. The perosn
who places the nominations is “agin” even the use of his initials . . . . .
The real estate agents will tell you—and they have tire records for proof!
—that trading Is on the up-nnd-up . . . . . Mtrs Fan Barnett, back in
Shelby for the federal court term, is one of the most popular girls who
ever lived here . . . . . Two afternoons from today—Friday—and the
baseball seas<#i will be ushered In at the city park. That’s how time sky
rockets by .... . C. R. Doggett and Bass Suttle could get together a very
Interesting list of “remember whens,” a list that would make the old
timers scraTh their heads—if they ynly would.A coincidence of
last week: M. Q. H. who sent In a "remember when” article on old school
days here is a brother of Mrs. Williams who had a similar contribtfllon
two days later. Neither knew the other had such In mind . ,. Did you
know that Boyce Dellinger gave Courtview hotel Its name? Or that the
brick from Shelby’s first court house can still be seen in the old Surratt
residence south of Shelby?
That'll be all for today. Such as It Is, it should be too much.
For Greater Results In Sellinsr-Try Star Adv.
GET YOUR BARBER WORK
CLOSE IN
At CHARLES BARBER SHOP
Now Located Next To Hotel Charles Entrance. Exper
ienced and Licensed Barbers. Modern Equipment. San
itation perfect.
These Men at Your Service:
— Howald Bridges — J. H. Wright —
-D.L. Willis
Build With Brick
DELIVERIES FROM PLANT TO JOB
When in need of FACE OR COMMON BRICK write us,
or phone 75m, Mt. Holly, N. C. With our fleet of trucks,
we can make quick deliveries to jobs, saving freight and
double handling, thereby putting brick to jobs in much
better condition.
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
SEE
KENDRICK BRICK & TILE CO.
MOUNT HOLLY, N. C.
OWNED and OPERATED BY WASHBURN and CO. EST. 1889
We Believe
In
WEARING
MORE
COTTON
v
BECAUSE 90% OF CLEVE
LAND COUNTY’S 5 2,107
PEOPLE ARE DEPENDENT
IN ONE WAY OR ANOTHER
UPON COTTON.
First
National
Bank
WE GROW
MANUFACTURE
LET’S WEAR
Cotton
COTTON
In Fashion
Cotton is recognized as the most
durable of all textile fabrics. It* is
being manufactured in n e w and
charming patterns and styles: new
piques, new knitted fabrics, n*e w
crepes—both heavy and sheer—all
types of embroidered and eyeleted
fabrics, shadowy prints, jdimities,
cotton nets and laces, plain broad
cloths, chambrays and velveteens.
Fashion again is leaning upon King
Cotton for things beautiful and dur
able. • *
Let us represent our own county in
the wearing of cotton in proportion
to our production of the South’s#ban
ner crop.
UNION
Trust Co.
WE GROW - ,
MANUFACTURE I ATT/"111
LET’S WEAR VUIIUII
    

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