North Carolina Newspapers

    The Cleveland Star
SHELBY, N. C.
MONDAY - WEDNESDAY —, FRIDAY
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
By Mall, per year_____
By Carrier, per year.....
•4UO
THE STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY. INC.
LEE a WEATHERS ___ President <tnd exutoi
B. ERNES'! HOEY ...........Secretary and foreman
RENN DRUM______ New* Editor
L. E. DAIL .................................. Advertising Msnagei
Entered ta second class matter January l. 1905. at tne postoitice
at Shelby. North Carolina, under the Act of Congress, March J. ttr/9
We wish to call your attention to the tact that it ts ana nas Deen
our custom to charge five cents per tine for resolutions of respect.
Cards of (thanks and obituary notices, alter one dr^Mr'RWice nas
shed. This will be strictly adhered to.
cards of .thi
been publish
WEDNESD’Y, MAY 20, 1931
TWINKLES
Now that we've had one Saturday without any rain we
jnay expect anything to happen. The legislature may ad-;
journ overnight and the business depression may dry up and
blow away most any day.
“Concord is famed,’ remarks The Charlotte Observer, “as
operator of the finest of county fairs in the country." Care
ful there, colonel, careful. There are around 100,000 people
who flock to the Cleveland county fair annually who might
Bak that the classification be amended to read “one of the
finest county fairs in the country."
Just a kitten! Last week at Sacramento, California, a
•mall kitten was mortally wounded when it fought off a
rabies-maddened dog when the .dog started to attack four
year-pld twins in the home where the kitten lived. Both the
kitten and dog were dead when an officer arrived. The chil
dren had not been touched.
After all it might be far more convenient to go ahead
»nd piss the so-called luxury tax or some other form of sales
tax. Either one would be an admitted nuisance, but think
What a bother it would be to be reminded day after day, “fum
How on," by Josephu^Daniels’ Raleigh News and Observer,
that THE LAW—the only one that matters, we suppose—had
been repudiated.
NOW WE’LL SNAP OUT OF IT
JUST ANOTHER WEEK or two now and we’ll have this
business depression-hard times mess cleaned up and
Wiped off the slate. Experts, wise boys, philosophers and
nuts have offered one remedy after another, but the busi
ness depression hangs on like a leech. As we said before,
however, it will not be long now; just another week or two
and hundreds of college graduates, with their crisp new
diplomas and sleek hair, will be with us to show us just how
it should be done. They’re wondering, we know, how we've
managed to get along this long without them. Graduating
classes have wondered such things year after year for more
years than we care to remember.
But, for fear this is taken as a cynical outburst, it is a
good thing that the old world, often down in a rut and in
peed of new blood, has a fresh, ambitious crop of self-confi
dence like that coming along each year to brace us up again.
PRINCE, PRINCESS—AND LOVE
EUROPE’S BACHELOR prince, H. It. H„ the Prince of
Wales, seems to have somewhat of a rival in Princess
Heana, of Rumania.
Perenially for years rumors were spread that the heir
to the British throne would wed. So often have there been
euch reports with subsequent denials that the world at large
has reached the conclusion that it must be shown before it
jwill believe the Prince of Wales will ever marry.
Ileana, the Rumanian princess, with, as The Spartan
burg Herald says it, “the lilting name and venturesome dis
position," is betrothed again. Ten or more times there have
been reports that Heana would wed. Time and time again
the world that is interested in princesses and love has wait
ed for Ileana to wed this and that prince and as yet Ileana
has not married. Perhaps she will not this time. And in
that role she becomes a counterpart of the Prince of Wales.
If either the prince or princess, or both, had any id«a
what a snappy plot for a newspaper story it would make,
wouldn’t it be grand if after all these years and all these re
ported announcements they should decide to marry each
•ther.
WILL NOT WORK EVERY TIME
THE SETTLEMENT made in the Rutherford bank ease*
has been a subject of wide comment over the entire
State. Some of the commentators are inclined to find favor
with the Sink decision while others do not. In this particular
instance The Statesville Daily thinks it worked very well, or
at least to the best interests of those who lost money in the
bank failure. ‘‘But,” The Daily adds, “there are not so many
cases in which it (restitution) should be allowed to pay the
debt in full.”
Says the Statesville paper; of the case:
The Rutherford bankers under conviction were per
■mitted to go without a day when they made restitution,
according to the stipulations of Judge Hoyle Sink. The
court agreed that if the five would pay $75,000 he would
not send them to prison. Four of them came forward
at the appointed time with $52,500. Th^ fifth was
given a little more time to raise his share. Another bank
er, in a similar case, was allowed to go on the payment
of $7,500. _ ,
Of the $52,500 paid in, it is said that $2,o00 will go
to pay the costs of the trial, taking that burden off the
county taxpayers, and the remaining $#>0,000 will be paid
to the unsecured creditors of the bank under the direc
tion of Judge Sink. It will not be turned over to the
liquidating agent of the bank, to be paid, out along with
the general funds*; but it will be distributed among such
I TOPNOTCHERS by Ket
Vv'YKOFF STEPPED
OFF lOOVAROy IN
THc REN\ARKABlE
TIME OF 9% SECONDS
A Nfcty Wl-DSmORD
)
<®. W. N. U.)
creditors as the court may decide are most in need of
relief, or who were least likely to benefit from the bank’s
assets, if any. The idea w.e get from the brief mention
of the court’s purpose is that Judge Sink has, through
the use of the criminal law, collected the sum mention
ed for the benefit of persons who would be the greatest
sufferers from the acts of the bankers. In other words
he is compelling them to make.restitution to those most
in need. <
Restitution should always: be required, compelled,
when it is possible to do so, and the more especially for
the benefit of those who would suffer most on account
of the acts of the principal. Recovering even a portion
of their losses is of vastly mox-e importance to the losers
than to know that somebody is in jail, comforting as
that is when one is robbed. But there is always a
question whether restitution should pay the debt in full.
.... Restitution, when and if made, should be taken into
consideration in administering punishment. But there
are not so many cases in which it should be allowed to
pay the debt in full.
UTILE TO BOAST OF HERE
CLEVELAND COUNTY has quite a reputation over North
Carolina for being “first,” or close to first, in a unmber
of things. There is one field, however, in which Cleveland
has very little—in fact, nothing, to boast of and brag about.
It is a very important field, too—education.
We tell the world, as we have the right to do, and many
outsiders help us, that when it comes to modern fanning and
modern living very few counties or sections can show Cleve
land anything. That is true. We produce more cotton than
any county in the State. Our per-acre production has the top
rung in the South. It is the best-terraced'county in the
State. Cleveland was a pioneer for the South in installing
electric lights and electric power and conveniences in the
rural sections. This year Cleveland farmers are attempting
to show the State how farmers should and can live at home.
All of which is enough to stir our pride.
But out in those electrically-lighted rural sections, where
we grow more cotton to the acre and stand out in many farm
activities, are children—the most important crop of all—who
have less educational advantages than do the children of 84
of the 100 counties in North Carolina.
Statistics assembled by the University News Letter
show that 84 North Carolina counties rank higher than Cleve
land in educational advantages for rural children. Those ad
vantages cover two phases, academic equipment and financial
equipment. The academic factor embraces the percentage of
enrollment in daily attendance, the length of the school term,
training of teachers, percentage of enrollment in high school,
and the percentage of enrollment who are normal and under
age for their grade. The financial factor covers the salary
of teachers, the instruction cost per pupil, current expendi
Card of Thank*.
We wish to take this opportunity j
to sinccerely thank all the friends,
who so kindly assisted and sent
beautiful flowers in our recent be
reavement. Mrs. J P. RoarU and
My. and Mrs. J. I. Moore and Fam
ily_
STOCKHOLDERS MEETING.
The annual meeting of the stock
holders of the Shelby Building and
Loan Association will be held in the
office of the association at 4 o’clock
p. m. on Thursday, May 28th, 1931.
J. F. ROBERTS. Secy-Treas.
4t 18c
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.
Raving tills day qualified as adminis
trator of the estate of Annie C. Putnam,
late of Cleveland countr, ff. C-, this la to
notify all persons having claims against
the said estate to present same to me
properly proven for payment on or before
the 39th day of April. 1933, or this notice
alii be pleaded tn bar of any recovery.
All peraons owing the said estate will
please make Immediate settlement to the
undersigned. This AprU 3d. 1931.
C. B. PUTNAM. Administrator of
Annie C. Putnam, Deceased.
6t 399
W. S. BEAM
LAWYER
Former Union Bank Bldg
CIVIL CASES ONLY
Telephone 62S
.. .’.1 111 " i m ’1
ONCE A MONTH j
NASH I
i
CLEANS OUT I
(
It is the policy of this J
store to go through (
our racks once each j
month, take out all )
dresses that have been i
\ here a certain length '
of time, place them in
J one section at prices i
j low enough to move i
them out.
Come tomorrow and
j see these Bargains.
Probably just the type i
( dress you have in i
5 mind is included in j
j this group.
Come early — we con- j
{ aider them real values. I
! NASH
r— PHONE 593 —
turc per. pupil, current expenditure per teacher and princi
pal, and value of school property per pupil enrolled.
It is a matter for Cleveland county citizens to think
1 about. There is no movement on foot demanding immediate
action, hut those statistics are something to keep in mind.
If the cotton crop was already a flop would the fertiliz
er be decreased and cultivation cut down? The crop of child
ren is worth many times more than the combined value of
the cotton crop and all other crops. Does a county first in
many things relish the idea of producing a stunted crop of
children? All have heard the story of the father who was
proud of his work team and proudly exhibited the mules to
all visitors and then escorted them to his pig pen to vision
the big hams coming at hog-killing time. The wife and
mother ii> the meantime was guiding her feminine friends in
and out of a wonderful garden and to her beautiful flower
beds. Playing half-heartedly about the yard were three
poorly-educated, unwashed children. The visitors saw them,
and, perhaps, w’oridered about them, but they heard no glow
ing stories of their brilliance and promise. Think it over.
A Couple of Ladies.
‘•There ain't no hotel here," he re
plied, "but you might fix it up to
sleep with the station agent.”
"Sir,” she exclaimed, indignant
ly. "I'm a lady.”
“Oh, that’s all right," drawled the
old man. “So is the station agent.”
Ham) Hated.
Mr. Littleton—What’s the idea?
These shirts are three sizes too big
for me. You know my size.
Mrs. Littleton—Well, the big sizes
doesn't cost any more than the lit
tle ones, and I’m not going to have
any store clerk know what a shrimp
I’m married to.
NASH
i ONCE A MONTH
1 Clearance
l 10-$12.50
DRESSES
$6.95
!
i
18
DRESSES
Values<to $16.50 I
$9.95
3 COATS
2-16* — 1 - 20
%
PRICE
22
DRESSES
$5.00 and $5.95
values
$3.95
Shantung* and
Print*
SPORT
PAJAMAS
79c
$1.00 Regular
Extra Large
DRESSES
Sizes up to 50
$9.95
i
TRULY
BARGAINS
IN
DRESSES
AT
Nash's
ONCE
A
i Month
Sale i
ROUTE TWO SHELBV
PERSONAL MENTION
(Special to The Star.)
Shelby, R-2.—Miss Madgelene
Hardin spent 'the past week in
Spindale and Rutherfordton visit
ing her cousin. She was accompan
ied home by her cousins. Mr. and
Mrs P. L. Crotts and children Mr.
and Mrs. Garland Marsh, Mr. Au
brey Crotts and Miss Emma Sans
mg, Miss Sansing remained ir Sir.!
by to spend the summer.
Mrs. S. S. Sansing and children
of Misses Ruth, Dorotha Ray ant
Master Samuel Sansing, Mrs. Her
mit McSwaln and son, also Mr
Bass McSwain visited- Mr. and Mrs
W. D. Hardin Sunday.
STAR ADVS. PAYS
Diarrhea, Dysentery and other forms of dis
ordered stomach and bowels, respond quickly
to and find relief from AM 1-FERX1E.M
For more than 2 generations it has been used
by adults lor up-set stomach and by mothers
for their children to avoid Colitis. At all
drug stores 60c and 75c.
A. V. Wray & 6 Sons
“SHELBY’S STYLE CENTER”
— ECONOMICAL SUMMER WEAR —
Ladies'’ Bathing Suits
Weight determines your size in a Jantzen. The key to
weight. Champion swimmers . . . fashionable swimmers
swimmers all prefer our bathing suits. Prices :-r
$1.98T0 $6.00
perfect- fit by
. . . occasional
MEN’S BATHING
SUITS
Your size and style awaits you at
Wray’s in Jantzen or a Rugby stiit.
A varied selection of models, Speed
Suit, Diving Suit, Twosome, Speed
aire or Two Piece. The suits that
changed Bathing to Swimming.
98c ro $6.00
MEN’S 2 - PIECE
UNDERWEAR
“CLASSY” Spring and Summer
Shirts and Shorts. They are gay
with color, comfortable to wear, up
to the minute in style and tune in
with the times. You’ll appreciate
the freedom of movement too.
Each piece . ,
25c 10 98c
KIDS BATHING
SUITS
Children’s Bathing and Sun suits
in tdhthe gay colors and styles:
Sun Twosomf, Two Piece, Speed
Suit and Sunhette.
69c 10 $2.98
I
—STRAWS—
The smart nonchalance of this dis
tinguished model is surpassed only
by its extreme comfort and light
ness. Choose one of our Straws,
Panama or light weight Felt and
you make an investment in style
that gives you the plus dividend of
fine quality and perfect workman
ship at a very interesting price.
Prices—
79 c,$4.95
    

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