North Carolina Newspapers

    The Cleveland Star
SHELBY, N. U
MONDAY! - WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY
SUBSCRIPTION PHICE
By MaU. per year _.....___...»_...
JBy Carrier, per year_____......_M.uu
THE STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY. INC.
LEE a. WEATHERS ......__ President and aartoi
& ERNES'l HOEY .... Secretary and foreman
KENN DRUM ............._...... News aaitoi
L E. DAIL .........._______....... Advertising Manager
JSntered as eecond class matter January l. 1805. at the postottice
at Shelby. North Carolina, under the Act ot Congress, March 8. iH'/v.
We wish to call your attention to the fatt that it is and has oeen
our custom tb charge five cents per line tor resolutions of respect,
cards ot thanks and obituary notices, after one death notice naa
been published. This will be strictly adhered to.
FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1931
TWINKLES
Practically every county in North Carolina has Visitors j
this week. The representatives and senators are home from
Raleigh, and how delighted we all are.
“Several Million Potato Plants Put Out In Cleveland
County,” informs a headline in our favorite tri-weekly. That
means the live-at-home movement in this county has attain
ed the yam-yam-yum-yum stage.
Tonight is the big night for the youngsters in the senior
class at Shelby high. It is also, their last night as students
there and as they reach the peak o* asion, the goal of more
than a decade of study, The Star hopes that it will truly be
a big night for every member of the class.
Now that the colleges are closing a contemporary is fill
steamed up about a new affliction. ‘‘The unemployment sit
uation is bad enough now,” says the contemporary, “but with
all the collegians on our hands it will be worse," The out
look isn’t quite so dreary, sir; it seems as if it will be cheap
er on the dads to keep them up at home than it has been at
college. Huh?
WE CERTAINLY SHOULD
THIS FROM THE WILKES Patriot: ~
The Cleveland Stdr editorially deplores the fact that
Cleveland county stands sixteenth from the bottom, in
the educational rank, measured by the same composite
yardstick as used in our analysis of educational work iu
this county some weeks ago. Commenting on this stand
ing The Star says: “If our cotton crop were already a
flop, would the fertilizer be decreased and cultivation
cut down? Does a county first in many things relish the
idea of producing a stunted crop of children? The crop
•f children is worth many times more than the combined
value of the cotton crop and all other crops.”
Cleveland county, as The Star points out will man
age to do something about this nearness to the bottom.
Wilkes, brother, is in a mood to do the same thing.
Admittedly, Cleveland should do something about it; in
fact, should have been doing it years ago. But when will it
be done. Right now hard times will be the excuse. That is
no excuse. W^hen a farmer has a bad year he doesn't lie
down and whine; instead, he hitches his suspenders up an
other notch, digs a little harder, and puts out a larger and
better crop. If the intelligence of our crop of children is
stunted by hard times, what of the times in the future?
AN OLD DOG TRIES NEW TRICKS
OCCASIONALLY AN OLD DOG tries a new trick and gets
by with it, but the old folks coined a saying that an old
dog seldom every gets by with new tricks, and the wisdom
of the old saying is upheld by the fact that nine times out of
ten they do not get by.
John Tessman, 70, of Chicago, was one of the nine that
did not get by.
In his younger days—spooning days-—John could drop
the reins over the dashboard and give in with both hands to
the combined lure of the moonlight and a pretty miss. But
these days one can’t wrap a steering wheel over the radiator
and let Dobbin take car of herself. John found that out and
paid $25 and the costs for the knowledge.
“I saw a pretty 16 year old girl so I offered her a lift,”
he explained. “Then I put my arm around her.”
“Driving with one hand,” the judge admonished.
“Sure, but it made me feel awful giddy and before I
knew it I hit another automobile.”
Louis Yactox*, 20, who was at the other end of the collis
ion, stepped forward.
“I didn’t mind that so much,” said Yactox-, “but the girl
he was with was my gitf friend.”
MINISTERS AND DIVORCES
FAST LIFE AND ULTRA MODERN ideas are blamed
among other things for the increase of the divorce evil.
Few people in denouncing the growing number of divorces
ever stop to think that many couples might be mismated and
that such mismating could have been prevented.
It is the Religious Telescope, a church periodical, which
says: “Perhaps ministers are responsible for a part of the
divorces. When a strip of a girl and an apology of a boy
pull into the parsonage for a nuptial knot, the preacher ought
to stop long ehough to make some inquiry as to the fitness
of things in general, and the fitness of these two things in
particular.”
In thinking over that view it might be worthwhile to
remember that North Carolina marriage restrictions, which
lack much of being rigjdly enforced, are driving many such
young anjl irresponsible couples to South Carolina Gretna
Greens where none too many questions arc asked. Some of
the marriage restrictions in this State do more harm than
good in that they scare away to South Carolina couples who
might bring themselves to meet requr ed conditions in this
State if there were no other method of getting married. In
these modem days, with fast automobiles and good roads, it
A
TOPNOTCHERS by Ket
CAPT.fCANK M. HAWKS HLW
TQM to? ANottes fb mu YORK /
« fbe PJ-COKV IIM€ o/- M'
12 HOUR* 25 MINUTES 3 SECOfirj"
ABfiAHfVfUNCOtN MONTEVERC _
offVKM&tlH.H J, WAlkEP iW1
hew mdck city ^ san fRANciyto
/X r/tf’ RECORD TlMC- *f
19 DAYS' IO HOUR.?
(©, W. N. o.)
is foolish to think that a young couple will become frighten
ed at some restrictions and then sit down and do nothing
about it. Instead; they’ll chuckle at the restrictions, clinil
in a rumble seat and hie away to South Carolina for the
ceremony. If it were not for these restrictions, they would,
in all likelihood, remain at home, get the consent of their
parents, and the proper start in life. The absurdity of such
matrimonial restrictions in a State which is bordered by other
States with no strict marriage regulations becomes more
and more evident each day.
PRODUCING 01 It OWN FOOD
THERE ARE MAN'i ANGLES to the live-at-home move,
ment and the phases thereof dealing with growing our
own food and feed. In some instances the farmers are to
blame, in others they are not.
Each year Cleveland County farmers send thousands of
dollars out of the county for hay and feed, crops that could
be produced hero. Several farmers talking in Shelby this
week stated that hard times had shown many Cleveland
' farmers that they could produce a bale of hay on their own
|land for one-fourth the price of a bale of imported hay.
Every farmer should bear that in mind. What good is an ex
tra bale or so of cotton, if all the cotton money goes to buy
hay.1 Among other weaknesses of ,such a system is the fact
that the land grows poorer and poorer.
But there is another angle. North Carolina farmers
send millions out of the State for food and food products.
They could and do produce a big portion of those foods and
could pxxKluce them all if they were assured that the surplus
could be taken care of, that markets would be created, and
canneries and other plants would cooperate in the movement.
The fanner cannot do it himself. The periodical of the North
Carolina Department of Conservation and Development
shows that each year North Carolina spends the following
money for outside foods: butter, $4,000,000; cheese, $4,500,
000: condensed and evaported milk, $50,000,000; canned
fruits and vegetables, $13,000,000; canned seafoods, $15,000,
000; meat and meat products. $23,000.000; pickles, preserves
and other processed foods, $20,000,000.
There ia no excuse, of course, for* farmer, in times like
the present, who does not grow as much food and feedstuff
as possible for his own consumption. That, as The Ashe
ville Citizens says, is “his only guarantee against absolute
want." But when it comes to producing food and feedstuff
for the towns and cities and for others he should be assured
a certain market; he cannot afford to find himself at the
end of the year with a big surplus of food products on his
hands. The Department of Conservation thinks this phase
can be taken care of by cooperation between industry and
agriculture. It cannot be done in a day or year but the mar
ket can be gradually built up.
The answer is curb markets, canneries, etc., as The Star
has been advocating for several years. Give a housewife
and farm woman a successful market where she knows that
she can sell her products and she will see to it that she has
an increasing number of things to sell. Give her and her
husband a community cannery that is organized and operat
ed properly and can market its product, and you will find
that the farm woman and the farmer will eagerly take ad
vantage of the new source of income offered them.
If the Department of Conservation and Development can
bring this cooperation between industry and agriculture to
fruition, then in that work alone it will have justified itself
ARCADIAN
OF So
There'* no need to send American dollars
abroad for nitrogen. Arcadian—-the American
'Nitrate of Soda i* made at Hopewell. Va. We
have it in 100- and 2Q(Mb. moiature-resisting
bags. 16% nitrogen, guaranteed. Easj to use
—ready to spplr right from the bag.
SOUTHERN COTTON OIL CO.
SHELBY, N. C.
.1 FRANK JENKINS, Manager
J
for its existence. There is something bad wrong with a sys
tem where fruit and vegetables rot on the farm because the
farmer has no ready market, or because he will not produce
more than he needs since he knows there is no such market,
when in nearby towns and cities more money than the home;
fanner would expect to get for his products is being paid out;
for imported foods.
.«,■■■■■■■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■. lllllIKlill.
I DO YOU WANT TO BUY OR SELL? 1
a Use Classified Advertising In The Star. J!
m 20,000 Readers and the Minimum Charge ■
I for a Want Adv. is Only 25c. Phone 11. ■
List Your
TAXES
Property and Poll Taxes for Cleveland County must
be listed during the month of May, to avoid penalty.
SEE THE FOLLOWING TAX LISTERS
4 !
No. 1 Township—J. A. McCraw, Lister.
No. 2 Township-W. C. Hamrick* Lister
No. 3 Township-A. A. Bettis, Lister.
No. 4 Township—H. B. Stowe, Lister.
!
No. 5 Township-M. P. Harrelson, List
er.
No. 6 Township-T. P. Jenks, Lister.
No. 7 Township-R. W. McBrayer, List
er.
No. & Township-B. P. Jenkins, Lister. -.j
No. 9 Township-C. S. Beam, Lister.
No. 10 Township—M. N. Gantt, Lister.
No. 11 Township-Warlick’s Store.
FAILING TO LIST WILL RESULT IN YOUR BEING .
PENALIZED BY LAW.
FARM CENSUS: Each farm owner or his agent is j
to come prepared to report the acreage of each crop to
be harvested on his or her tenants’ farm this year. Also
acres cultivated, lying out. number of bearing fruit
trees and the toas of fertilizer used for all crops. Pre
pare your list now. .This Farm Census is required by
State laiv, but is NOT for taxation purposes.
R. L. WEATHERS, Cleveland County Tax
Supervisor.
THE BEST
MONEY
CAN BUY
Only Budweiser quality
can insure the results you
expect. There’s nothing
like* Budweiser Barley*
Malt Syrup ... A finer
product is not available
at any price—it is"the
be*’ money can buy,” and
will establish the fact
that it fakes precedence
over all others for flavor
and wholesomeness.
Hear Tony Cabooch, Anheuser- j
4 Busch's one-man radio show every
Saturday night over the Columbia
Broadcasting System.
Budweiser
Barley-Malt Syrup
ft J~—. LIGHT OR DARK-RICH IN BODY 1.
. -FLAVOR JUST RIGHT
It pays to buy the best
Use quality products Jrom
the House o(
ANHEUSSR* BUSCH
•T. toui. ^in
MONTH-END
SELLING
^ AT
McNEELY’S
The greatest opportunity women of this sec*
tion have ever had to get fashionable wearing
apparel at such drastic reductions!
Gorgeous Garments, Lovely Lines, Cor
rect Styling—Speak Forcibly in This Mc
Neely Economy Event
BEGINNING SATURDAY
Fifty
$6.95 DRESSES
Consisting 6f Sports Materials and Silks; in a
variety of stvlcs . . . Month-end . . .
$3.95
These are odd dresses selected from our regu
lar stock.
JUNE 1 BEGINS NATIONAL COTTON WEEK!
Five Dozen
COTTON DRESSES
Including Broadclotts, Voiles and Polka Lots
, . . Month-end . . .
89c
Every Dress Guaranteed Fast Colors
- • * — Fifty Of Our
BETTER DRESSES
Selected for the Month-End from our regular
$16 and $19.75 racks .. . To sell at. . .
$12.95
New Shipment
CORSELETTES and COMBINATIONS
of Satin Brocade,. . Specially priced for Month
end ....
$1.95
Fifteen
LINEN DRESSES
in a small assortment of solid colors . . . Month
end .. .
$2.95
Big Assortment
COTTON VOILE DRESSES
Including the famous Nelly Don line . . Month
end ...
$1.95
MONTH-END
y% Price
SELLING
of 20 SPRING COATS and SUITS, to close out.
One Hundred Twenty-Five
DRESSES
at a drastic concession for this event ... all
copies of much higher priced models . . Month
end price . . .
$8.88
MILLINERY
We have just received a new shipment
rough and novelty straws
AND
SHAMMY SUEDE TAMS
Including a hat for every type head . . . See
the cool, new straws before you make up your
mind to buy.
J. C. McNEELY
& Co., Inc.
STYLE — QUALITY - SERVICE
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view