North Carolina Newspapers

    The Cleveland Star
SHELBY,* N. <J.
MONDAY — WEDNESDAY — FRIDAY
g. , “ SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
*1 Kill, per year —-----gy.oo
By Carrier, per year---ss.uu
THE STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY. INC.
LEX B. WEATHERS__fresident ana rtaitor
& ERNEST HOEV mmmmm----Secretary ana foreman
RENN DRUM_—___.... __ News isattor
Li El DAIL .....................- Advertising Manager
Entered as second class matter January 1, 1V05, at trie postottice
at Shelby, North Carolina, under the Act of Congress. Msrch a. 187V.
We wish to call your attention to the fact that it is and nas oeen
our custom to charge five cents per Hue for resolutions of respect,
cards of thanks and obituary notices, arter one death notice nas
Been published. This will be strictly adhered to.
FRIDAY, .JULY
1931
TWINKLES
Tomorrow is the Fourth—the one day in the year which
nay outclass Sunday as a day of highway slaughter. Ke
nember thut as you go motoring.
Shelby civic clubs should gladly cooperate in the move
nent to restore an evening outgoing mail here. No outgoing
nail, east and south, after b in the evening until 7 the next
Horning, will work a handicap on business in this section.
Alexander the Great wept because there wore no more
worlds to conquer, but the flight around the world in less
han 10 days by Post and Gatty would have sounded like the
maginative raving of an insane man to the conqueror.
“Much Canning In County This Year.” informs a head
ine in our favorite tri-weekly. And with the State refus
ng to work prisoners with sentences shorter than 60 days it
ippears as if there will be right much of it going on for the
•emainder of the year.
Calvin Coolidge writes in his column that any nation
vhich can weather an economic storm as America has been
loing is in very sound condition and dependable. But we
vonder if the former president had realized that it is hard
‘or a nation to crawl out on a window sill and leap for the
■idewalk from the fourteenth floor.
Various cities and towns in the Carolinas have been
minting out recently that the heat hasn’t been as unbear
able In their cities as in others. That line of talk may be
lassified as A-l publicity by the chamber of commerce, but
o our way of thinking it has been plenty hot everywhere in
he two States.
Rev. L. B. Hayes today takes over the duties as presi
dent of the Shelby Rotary club, and knowing him as Shelby
loes it Is accepted knowledge that the civic organization is
ntering upon another good year of community service and
he strengthening of friendships between men who are in
egral factors in the life of the city.
An Eastern Carolina newspaper hears of a man being
Jlled in a mica mine not far from Shelby and remarks that
lown that way they did not know there were such mines in
his section. But for this we may be thankful: It was not
*ne of these eastern papers which, hearing of a new industry
ip this way. would immediately start clamoring for taxes to
>e taken over their lands and slapped on the industry up
tere.
BISHOP OPENS CAMPAIGN
USHOP CANNON opened up his 1932 presidential cam
paign while on a visit to Charlotte this week. And, as
sual, the good bishop leaves several gaps in his statements
nd declarations which are a bit puzzling.
If the Democrats will only nominate McAdoo in 1932.
« declares, “the whole prohibition question will be lifted
ut of the campaign,” Looking over that statement, The
lharlotte Observer very aptly remarked, “but just how the
omination of McAdoo could bring that to pass is not ex
lained.”
Another puzzle, if you care to dig deeper into the state
lents of the politically-minded churchman, is this: If the
ishop is against a candidate will it aid or injure the candi
ate? Or, to reverse it, if the bishop is for a candidate, how
dll that candidate's future be swayed?
PEACHES. VEGETABLES HERE
». BELMONT MAN has'called the attention of The Char
lotte Observer to the fact that fine peaches are grown
ear Belmont, not so far distant from Charlotte, as well as
t the Sandhills. The Observer has been an ardent booster
f the Sandhill peach section and is to be commended for
hat interest in the peach area, nevertheless Belmont is giv
n proper credit. In that connection, it might be noted that
utsiders are learning this year that many things other than
otton are produced in Cleveland county. Widely known at
cotton county, the average visitor to this section appears
urprised to see anything else growing. A visit to the semi
eekly curb market in Shelby will reveal that some mighty
ine peaches and fruits are produced by the farmers of Cleve
md county. And, although they were an oddity to a certain
xtent hereabouts a decade or two back. Cleveland house
’ives are this year “putting up” more English peas than
ver before.
k All the Cleveland county eggs aren’t being toted in one
asket this year.
ANOTHER INVESTIGATION
T SEEMS TO BE an open season for investigations inspir
; ed for political purposes.
George Pritchard, overwhelmingly defeated tor the
United States Senate by Josiah W. Baiey, Democratic can
idate, started an investigation. Just before that move Sen
tor Morrison challenged the appointment of Chas A..
1
TOPNOTCHERS by Ket
WHOLYMAN'o/ INDIA
3CBN 1309 -
mCRlEOafMtf AOEo/15
STUDIED LAW /A. LONDON of 19
JHy. RETIRING, AWKWARD
HE WA? DlAV DECLARED A
PARQIJTEO in JUNE 1691.
RETURNED to INDIA at OhCL to
PRACTICE LAW.
RAISED and COMMANDED a
PEP CROSS’ WIT in AfPlCA CWfiO
&OEP WAR
1
RETURNED 1b INDIA A NATIONAL WPO.>
A SKILLED MANIPULATOR ©/* '
PUBLIC OPINION
IMPRISONED MANV TIMES'
ONLV rePSruRN MOPS
POPULAR. THAN tUt**
M8&8&0
CAN SO APPfAL to
too. 000.000
rttfrvlS OF INPIA
— HlS TfcACHlWCs -—
NEVBtt *fc> RPTORF
rb VIOLENCE
NEVE/? to PEPEND
UPCW ALMS*
as district attorney. Now we have a new one on our hands.
District Attorney Jonas nominated Attorney J. M. Hoyle
of Gastonia, for a position as assistant district attorney.
Congressman Bulwinkle, who defeated Mr. Jonas, soon let
it be known that he would not indorse the Hoyle appoint
ment until an investigation was made. The new phase de
veloped when Neil C. Perry, World war veteran, suggested
that when he talked to Mr. Hoyle, the Jones nominee, about
a job as prohibition agent Mr. Hoyle intimtfted that he might
endorse Perry if the latter were willing to do a good turn in
turn by contributing so much annually to the Republican
campaign expenses. Mr. Jfoyle said it ’t’warn’t so’ and Mr.
Perry said ‘t'is”—and there you are.
First thing you know we may have enough investiga
tions going on to relieve the unemployment situation.
SYNTHETIC FISHING
WE’VE HAD OUR synthetic golf, and our miniature this
and miniature that, and being a town that is fond of
fishing Shelby may be considerably interested in the an
nouncement that ^synthetic fishing is the latest thing.
“In Eos Angeles,” informs The New York Times,
where things move faster, trout fishing has been brought
into the heart of town, so that a man may do his fishing on
the way home from the office. A trout pool stocked with
fish is now open for business on Wiltshire Boulevard, a fash
ionable Los Angeles thoroughfare.
‘‘Already three 'synthetic fishing clubs' have opened
within a half hour's drive of midtown.
“It is an economical diversion; you pay nothing if you
catch nothing and only 35 cents for each fish taken. The
fish may be cleaned, cooked and eaten on the premises, or
tidily packed up and taken home. Miniature golf, already on
the wane, must, feel sorely the competition of this innova
tion.”
STRIB'S LAST BIG CHANCE
TONIGHT THE STATE OF GEORGIA, incubator of athletic
champions, may have another champion, _ and, again,
may‘not. When tonight’s Schmeling-Stribling battle is over,
rif W. L. (Young) Stribling, the Georgia boy, is not the victor
and does not win his victory in a decisive manner, he will be
through in the big time* fight game.
The bout tonight lacks the color and glamor of other
major boxing matches. The young German, Schmeling, has
not been an idol since becoming champion because he won the
crown once worn by Tunney—and by Dempsey, Willard, et
al—on a foul. Nevertheless he is a fine physical specimen,
better than the average boxer and can take plenty of punish
ment, or stand the gaff, as they say in sporting circles. If
Stribling tonight is the Stribling that banged Kisko all over
the ring, or the Stribling that floored Scotty then the Georgia
boy will be the heavyweight champion tomorrow morning,
and a colorful one at that. But if he is the Stribling who
boxed and danced and clinched with Sharkey and did like
wise in many of his other big bouts, then he will be licked
and no great number of people will be sorry. Stribling hasn’t
a peer as a boxer, but only upon rare occasions has he ex
hibited real fight. The fans who pay the fiddler desire fight
when they go to a boxing match; they’re noj^ looking for
fancy dancing and clever footwork about the ring. That’s
why Dempsey, the Manassa man mauler, could draw the
crowds; he vaulted, in like a tiger at the first bell and was
just one lunging, hammering mass of battle until it was over.
Stribling has his last big chance tonight; he has muffed
more opportunities in big bouts and been given another
chance than has any other fighter in the history of the
game. He has shown that he can fight when he forgets
caution, turns loose and lets go. The South naturally hopes
it will be the fighting Stribling tonight, not the clever box
er. If such is not the case, the Georgia boy’s future is fixed;
he is headed back, and headed for good, to the tank towns
where he may bowl over one palooka after another. Tonight
is the turning point, the last big opportunity for him. If
he comes through, another name will be added to the Georgia
list which is headed by Bobby Jones and Ty Cobb. If he does
not, it is the beginning of the trek down the hill on which
there is po road leading back.
TiTStHt EVER! OMR IUY S2.&D PER YDIR
L
Belwood Section \
Events Of Week
j Mr. Frank Stanley Home From
| Hospital. Mule Steps On Mr.
Peeler’s Foot.
'Special to The Star t
Belwood, July 1.—Mr. Frank
Stamey has returned home from
the Llncolnton hospital where he
underwent an operation for appen
dicitis.
Ur. and Mrs. J. A. Young of New-]
ton were the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
W. R. Porter Friday night.
Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Turner and
son. Buddy, were the dinner guests
of Dr. and Mrs. Newton of Spar
tanburg last Wednesday.
Misses Ethel and Lillie While are
spending several days with Miss
Audrv Leonhart of Shelby.
Little Miss Sybil Norman spent
the week-end with her grandpar-l
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Sain of Toluca, i
Mrs. Esixt Royster and son, C.,
E., jr., and Master Ralph Gilbert.!
Jr., of Flay spent the week-end]
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.:
A. Peeler.
Mrs. M. L. Willis and children ol
Lincolnton spent last Tuesday night
with her mother, Mrs. S. L, Gantt.
Master Billy remained for several
days visit.
miss Eiiie weilmon entertained a
number of her friends Saturday
night with a party. A large crowd
was present and all reported a fine
time.
Misses Ola May Gantt and Hazel
Richard and Mr. Buford Richard
and Charles Wright motored to the
Irene Park at Gaffney, 8. C. Sat
urday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Dixon and
children visited her parents, Mr.
and Mrs, J. T, Houser of Vale Sun
day afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Elkins and
daughter, Miss Bernice spent the
week-end with Mr. and Mrs, R. L.
Fox of Charlotte.
Master Marlon Hoyle, jr„ of
DISSOLUTION NOTICE^
This is to notify all who niay be
concerned that the firm of Hard
wlcke and Baber, fertilizer dealers,
has been dissolved. As a result I will
no longer be responsible for any ob
ligations of said firm.
S. L. BABER.
AVOID
PENALTY
Tax payers must list
their property for
county taxes. Fail
ure to do so involves
a penalty which can
not be escaped. See
the tax lister in the
township in which
you own property
and give in your real
and personal prop
erty at once.
R. L. WEATHERS,
County Tax
Supervisor
RUN-DOWN and
WEAK
:‘I began tak
ing Cardul when In
a weakened, run-down
condition,” writes Mrs.
T. S. Perrit, of Wesson,
Miss. “I took one bot
tle, and I seemed to im
prove so much that I
sent for six bottles. Af
ter I had taken the six
bottles, I seemed entire
ly well.
"Before I took Car
dui, I was nervous, rest
less, blue and out of
heart. I felt depressed
all the time. After I
took Cardui, all this
disappeared.
"I gave my daughter
Cardui and it helped to
relieve Irregular . . .”
This medicine hu been ueed
by women (or over *0
CARDUI
Helps Women to Health
1
Take Thedford’e Bteck-Dreaght
ter Conetloetlon. Indirection,
.end BlUn’jan-ec
r
Coolomee is spending several days
with Master Jack Hoyle.
Misses Vemle and Annie Pear)
Hunt ol Fallston spent the week
end with Misses Ruth and Vera
Hartman.
Mr. and Mrs. Willis Hoyle ol
Vale were the dinner guests of her
parents Mr. and Mrs. George Peeler
Sunday.
Miss Pearl Gantt and friend vis
ited her sister Mrs. M. L. Willis of
Lincolnton Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Turner had as
their guests Sunday afternoon Mr.
and Mrs. Gus Hendrick and chil
dren of Shelby and Mrs. Clarence
Warlick of Vale.
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Warlick
and son, R. A., Jr., of Lawndale,
were the dinner guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Quincy Hartman Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Jeffries
and children and Mr. and Mrs. By
num Chapman of Lincplnton spent
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Norman.
Miss Ruby Richard spent last
week with her sister Mrs. Johnny
BufF.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Glenn and
children, Buddy and Mary, and Mrs.
Mary Proctor of Shelby visited Mrs.
S. L. Gantt Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Peeler and
children and Mrs. Noah Hubbard
spent Sunday afternoon with Mr
and Mrs. J. A. Peeler.
Rev. J. M. Morgan delivered a
fine sermon at Knob Creek churcli
Sunday evening.
Misses Elaln Deal and Florence
Daybeiry, nurses of the Lincoipton
hospital spent Saturday night with
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. P.
Deal and Mr. and Mrs. Elija Day
berry.
Mr. and Mrs. Mack Willis and
children and Mr. and Mrs. Dock
Willis and children of Llneolnton
spent Sunday afternoon with Mr.
and Mrs. Will Willis.
Misses Ruby and Ethel Willis of
Rock Dale were the dinner guests j
of Miss Helen Starnes Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Cline and
children of Lawndale visited Mr. j
and Mrs. Mack Smith Sunday even
ing.
Mr. J. A. Peeler had the misfor
tune of a mule stepping on his foot
He has been unable to walk for the
past week.
An exchange wants to know what
United States has to worry about
when it has over $15,000,000,090 in
vested abroad, to which the Lexing
ton Herald replies, "That's the ans
wer.’’ And it will be difficult to
think of a better one.—Philadelphia
Inquirer.
Only .3 of one percent of the peo
ple in North Cardin* are foreign
born. The slate thus maintains hri
leadership in the proportion o! her
population of native birth.
~TKISTKE'S S.AI.E OK REAL ESTATE
Under and bv virtue of the authority
contained In that certain deed of trust,
executed by A. C Beam and wile Mar
guerttte Beam to the undersigned truste*
said deed of trust being dated January l,
1930 afid recorded In the office of tbe reg
ister of deeds for Cleveland county. N. v ,
in book No. 166 at page 13. securing an
indebtedness to the Shelby and Cleveland
County Building and Loan association,
and default having been made in the
pavment of said indebtedness, and being
requested to sell said property I will on
Monday, August 3rd, 1931
at 12 o’clock, noon,‘or within legal hours
at the court house door in Shelby, N. C\,
sell to the highest bidder for cash at
public auction that certain lot of land
lying and being in No. 5 township.
Cleveland county, N. C., and bounded as
follows:
That lot lying and being In the town of
Waco. N. C.. and on the east side of
South Main street and described by metes
and bounds as follows:
Beginning at a stake on the east side or
South Main street and runs thence N. 36
E 28\poles to a stake in the old line,
thence S. 54 E. 76 poles to a stake, a new
corner; thence S. 34 W. 28 poles to a
sta^e, in the east edge of South
Mam street; thence with the east edge of
the said street N 54 W. 90 feet to the
beginning and being a part of that lot
which was conveyed to A. C. Beam by
David P. Dellinger, commissioner by deed
dated December 12th, 1919 and recorded
in the office of the register of deeds for
Cleveland county. N. C. in book of deeds
EEE at page 239.
This J«ly 2nd, 1931.
JNO. P MULL, Trustee
• it July 3c
We Will Be Open For Business
All Day Saturday, July 4th
'O' vp
The Greatest Value
We Have Ever Offered
IN
Living Room Luxury
3-Piece Wool Mohair Suite, covered
all over; coil construction, reversible
seats.
*6950
$3 DELIVERS — $1.50 A WEEK
Your Porch Can
Be Made Into A Good Place To Live
Make Your Selections From Kester-Groome’s Complete
Stock Of Porch Furniture
— GLIDERS—
Spring coil cnostruction seat
and back, with and without
reversible cushion. Assortec
colors.
$7.50 ANI> w
PORCH ROCKERS
Maple Porch Rockers In As
sorted Colors.
Priced
Up
From
FREE
Come in Saturday, July 4, And Get a
FREE Long-Handle DUST PAN.
(One to a Family.)
FREE
Kester-Groome Furniture Co.
"OUR VOLUME OF BUSINESS ENABLES US TO SELL FOR LESS”
OPPOSITE BAPTIST CHURCH __ SHELBY, N. C.
    

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