North Carolina Newspapers

    Farmers Here Oppose
Special Session Call
•11 depends to a considerable ex
tent upon the prosperity of th*
farmer. He did not believe, howev
er, he said, that a session of legis
lature would help. He pointed out
that condition* vary in the various
stata» and even within separate
sections of this state Texas, he con
tinued, could curtail the crop there
and still mate more cotton than
all North Carolina with every acre
in cotton. He reminded, too, and
this point struck, a responsive
chord, that a cotton curtailment In
eastern Carolina would not be ex
actly the same as in this section.
Tobacco, peanuts and other cash
crops are grown there, he remind
ed. and tf cotton were curtailed the
eastern farmers could count upon
an income from their other cash
crops. Here without cotton the
farmers would have no cash crop
to speak of on which to depend
“Ijiwlnr" Farmer*.
Mr. Mull expressed objection in
one instance because he said the
farming industry Is the one thing
not now regulated by law Legisla
tion now telling the farmer he must,
do this and he must do that would
only open up a new source of leg
islation to pass more laws telling
the farmer what he should do on
his own land, how long he should
work, how much he should pay hi.;
hired man and how long the hired
man could work each day. A gen
eral reduction plan if adopted by
all the cotton growing states before
any legislation was enacted could
have been helpful, he said, but for
each state to go off on a different
plan with the provision that none
of the plans would go in effect un
less the states with other plans
would adopt those could bring noth
ing but confusion.
Offers Good Advice
Mr. Moore, a veteran and highly
respected farmer, made one of the
beat talks of all. His was a sermon
on thrift and living at home. He
had reared a family, got along pret
ty well, he said, and today doesn’t,
owe a dollar. But he had never ''shot
the works’’ on cotton and had al
ways managed to feed his family
and We stock upon the land he
worked. He pointed out the Incon
sistency of growing cotton and
working hard and then taking the
cotton money to buy feed that
have been produced where some of
the cotton was grown. Good old
common sense, he insisted, was
better for the farmer than all leg
islation, his argument being that
the eensible farmer should know
enough by next year to feed him
self, his family and hi* livestock
before putting out a stalk of cot
ton.
In all the talks the live-at-home
idea was highly commended. It was
recalled that the cotton acreage
in the state, was reduced 38 per cent
thie year and extra acres given to
food and feed crops. Had such not
been done, one speaker said, ‘ we’d j
be in a beck of a fix. Let’s cut down
our cotton more next year and give '
more acres to something we can
eat and feed. ’
The Resolution.
The resolution offered by Mr
Dixon, opposing a special session,
was adopted almost unanimously.
It follows
The farmers of Cleveland coun- j
ty, in mass meeting assembled in
Shelby, N. C., this September 24. j
1831. for the consideration of the!
present status of the cotton indus-!
try and for formulating plans for
improving the farmers present de- !
plorable condition, do resolve as i
follows
First; That the hope of establish-!
teg profitable farming by the en
actment of laws is a delusion and
a snare.
Second That there is at present
no reasonable grounds for believing
that our state legislature could in-,
crease the price of cotton by leg-1
tslation, curtailing production, or !
otherwise; and we oppose the call- j
teg of a special session as it would
be both expensive and useless.
Third That the program of the
fanners should be to produce on
the farm all the food and feed
stuffs consumed and thus “lire-at
home” and after every farm need
has thus been produced spend the
balance of his time in growing cot
ton and other money crops. By
this plan North Carolina has reduc
ed her cotton acreage 28 percent
during the past two years, which
ts both a larger reduction and a
better plan than any other state
can enforce by legislation
“Sign. Of Time.”
Dr. Well’. Theme
"The Signs of the Times,” will be
the subject of Dr. Zeno Wall, in the
service at the First Baptist church
next Sunday morning at 11 o’clock.
Everyone is invited to the Sunday
school at 9:30. In the evening at
«:«5 the B. Y. P. tJ’a will meet,
which will be followed by the even
ing service at 7;45
Ur. Easom announces splendid
musical programs for both morn
ing and evening services.
It Pays To Advertise
Sarratt Asks For
Cotton Gathering
j •( OXTINUED FROM PACK OM '
and be a stabilizer Anything else
will do hann.
Gov. Gardner, I suggest that you
again ask all governors of cotton
states < governors only> to meet in,
say Montgomery, in coherence
Each governor . first having found
that his lawmakers would back an
uniform plan agreed upon by con
ference of governors, otherwise
conference would be useless, I
further suggest that each state gov
ernor have one vote for each 50,000
bales or fraction thereof as based
on this year <1931) last Indicated
yield on any plan. That each gov
ernor agree to abide by a majority
vote on any plan adopted. If a ma
jority vote wanted no cotton it.
1932, abide. If a majority vote said
5,000 000 bales for the U. 8. in 1932,
let that settle it. Take this year's
last U. S. Indicated yield by states
and proportion each state its pro
duction for 1932 and each state levy
a uniform tax, say 5c lb. gross lint
cotton on all over proportion that
might be raised. payable to the
ginners at the time ginned and to
be paid into the state treasury. No
state would have any cost in thej
operation Not a cent would go out,
of any state.
Say for example, Texas’ propor
tional part wo* 1,500.000. The first
government's indicated yield in 1932
.showed 2,000,000. This would show
an excess 500,000 bales. This would
make a tax for the state of Texas
of 1 2-3 cent lb. on all cotton pro
duced in the state of Texas in 1932.
"If North Carolina's proportional
part was 260,000 bales and her in
dicated yield showed 600,000 bales,
then the producer would have to
pay 2 1-2 cent lb. to the ginners at,
the time ginned and that paid into
state treasury^
"If Mississippi’s proportional part
was 500.000 bales and the indicated
yield showed she would not produce
more, site would not pay any tax.
It’s simple, practical, workable, ab
solutely fair, very needful and will
work, without cost,
"Governors Ixmg, Sterling and
Blackwood you have each done fine.
You have at least tried, hoping the
rest would follow. I believe any
thing either has done or will do
would beat nothing, it was only
made uniform. If at first you do not
•mcoecd try again, The next trial
will put it over just right.
"Governors Horton and Bilbou.
you should each join the ranks but
with the understanding that no
guns are to be turned on you in anv
event.
"The south should put the spurs
to Gov. Sterling, the saddle horse.
Possibly hold Governors Long and
Blackwood back just a little, tie a
rock in Gov. Bilbou's car, switch
all the rest, get them to pull to
gether and we will get more th°
load without unloading. Call all
sessions on the same day, go at it
like men. It's a man's Job but it
can be done. Feel them all out again
governor."
Si»k Brothers Lease
Temple Barber Shop
E. E. and Horace Sisk have leas
ed the Temple Barber shop from
Mrs, Blanche Dudley and will take
charge on Monday of next week.
The Temple shop is located in the
Weathers and Blanton Building
next to the J. C. Penney Co, store.
E. E. Sisk has been with the Palace
and Central shops while Horace
Sisk is employed at the Dover shop
Both are well known young men
Penny Column
LOST: GREEN SHEAFFEK
ever-sharp pencil, with name "Wal
ter E. Wall" stamped in gold. Find
er return to Walter E. Wall, at
Penney Co. U 35*
LOST: REY~RING~WITH~NUM
ber ot keys. Finder return to Star
office. It 23c
LOST DIAMOND - SHAPED
gold cuff links. Reward. Return to
Star office, 3t as?
Sanitary Market
Saturday Specials
3 pounds Snowdrift Lard and
1 pint Wesson oil, both
. for — 73e
-Matches, 3—5c boxes for 10c
13 large cans Herring 25c
! Home made Molasses, gal. 50c
,8-lb. bucket Lard_. 75c
i Large Ripe Bananas, lb. 5c
3—5c pkgs. Salt ..._10c
Meats: Liver Mush, home
made, 2 lbs. _25c
Pickled Pig Feet, each ... 5c
Country Pork Sausage, lb. 2oo
Good Beef Roast, lb, ... 15c,
Heavy Side Meat. lb. ... I0e
Sliced Cured Ham, lb. 25cj
Fresh Fish: Trout, 3 lb. 25c
- Sanitary Market -
PHONE 48
Next to Quinn’s Drug Store,
South Washington Street
Nobody’s
Business
ny gee mcGek
Nutt-Shells
How about sending Mr Hoover
"just Rrounrl the comer to tell
prosperity to get a move on her*
! self? Mcbbe she's asleep
Tire farm board has at Inst de
clared its policy It. does not in
tend to buy any wheat or tell any
corn or swap any potatoes for tea
However, they re.se ve the right to
change this policy over-night with
out notice, except possibly their
wives might be told
Cotton letter.
New York, Sept. 24 The last
government crop estimate was re
ceived very well, 1 thank you', how
arc all vour folks? The report that
all the southern states had agreed
to let Texas raise all of the cotton
from now on was received with a
pinch of salt and pepper by Wall
street last Tuesday, and that ac
counts for the decline of 43 points
on November shorts. Consumption
last month was *ery light, and so
was flu and typhoid, but some itch
is prevalent where cotton is fetch
ing only 6 cents which won't pay
for the guano. We look for more
slumps and bumps, but we advise
buying on lows and .selling on highs
for the present, and maybe longer.
.. A man was arrested m Wash
ington last week for trying to force
his way into the house of represen
tatives. He was examined for lu
nacy and found guilty. What he
ought to have done was gone on,
back home, and run for congress in
the usual way. and he no doubt,
would have been elected by a large
majority. If he could not make
congress we feel sure that he could
make the legislature all right
-The prospects arc that eggs
Will fetch a good price this fall. We
still have our hennery. It was hard
to stay in the egg business when
we could buy them at the store
cheaper than we could lay them.
Wc have 16 pedigreed hens. All of
them are laying now except 14, and
they look promtsing. We have cut
our roosters down to 7. The poultry
game Ls a good one if somebody will
furnish you your feed free of charge j
Our own-laid eggs have cost u$ an
average of about 23 per egg since
There will be no radical change
m women's autre for this fall. One
of the ladles 111 "The Shoppe" here
told me yesterday that they would
continue to use some underwear
and possibly crepe petticoctr now
and then. Dresses will be somewhat
longer, but \ery much thinner from
the knees on down. Belts may be
worn, and occasionally It will be
nice to wear brassieres "xcept in
the evenings. Hose will remain sill:
and so will the ??•!'’*"!/ '"’I- and
nr ??;;•• hftfiib
Mike Demand* Troicclion.
flat lock. s. C, sepp. 24 1331.
the inster state commerce rammish
i Washington. D c.
deer sirs:
i notis by the papers where yot
all have planned to force the truck
which hauls freight for Ixire parry
tell with a railroad to charge 10,
per cent more for hauling same
than the sed railroad charges, i
think well of this plan, as the rail
roads can't cut their rates and
therefoar do not seem lo be haul
ing annything nowadays.
gentlemen, i want you to please
hepp me out of the hole in the j
same manner .inr. smith owns a j
stoar which runs parry-Jell with
my stoar and i want you to make
him charge 10 per cent more for his
beef and porch chops and livver
than i charge and then i can soon i
put him out of bizness. ple*e work I
fast on him as he is hurting me a j
right smart with his unlawful com-!
pytition
there is not much monney in the j
beef market biziness now, and mei
or mr, smith one ought to quit, and
I want it to be him, as i pay taxes
on all my stuff, he has cut under
me on various prices in the past
and i have tried to make the town
charge him a higher licents to do so, j
but they say they cannot do so, and!
the law ought to handle him for j
same.
my only chance is in yore hands,
unless you make him sell higher, aj
mighty good man will soon be broak j
and you all will miss my taxes, he j
has not got as much monney invest- i
ed as i have, my customers makes
me deliver all of my goods, and he
makes them come for theirs, so he
can get along on less expense than
i can. you se, he is just like the
trucks—he has the advantage of
me, and the law ought to handle
him for same.
rite or foam at once and let me
know how soon you can make him
raise his prices higher than mine,
anu 11 nc r.u miu tu wimi
ever you say he will hafter charge,
i will report his violation of yore
commish to you by wire. people
have bonds and mortagges or my
property, and you must se that
they are proteckted against such
compv-tition
yores trulie.
mike Clark, r.'d
Beth-Ware Local
New* Of Interest
Farmers Busy Ticking Cotton. Per
sonals Of People Visiting
Abont.
(Special to The Star *
Beth-Ware, Sept. 23.—Tire peo
'.e of this community are very
i,i,y picking cotton.
Mrs. Chivous McSwain visited
Mrs. J. H. Yeiton Friday afternoon.
The Sunday guests of Mr. and
Mrs. H. W. Gamble were their son,
Theodore, of Charlotte. Mr. and
Mrs. Jasper Ware and children .if
Charlotte, Mr, and'Mrs. Sam Jones
of Florida.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hawkins of
Bessemer City spent Sunday with
Mr. and Mrs. Dee Harmon.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Yeiton and
children spent the week-end with
Mr. YeltoiYs sister, Mrs. L. L. Whit
worth in Bessemer City.
The Sunday guest3 of Mr. and
Mrs. Floyd Herndon were his
mother, Mrs. Watt Herndon and
brothera, Mr. Frank Herndon, Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Herndon, Mr. and
Mrs. George Herndon and children,
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Herndon
and children,
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Roberts and
little sons, Jean and Joe, of Shelby
visited Mrs. Roberts’ parents Sun
day. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gamble.
Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Champion of
Oaffney, S. C., Were the guests of
Mrs. D. A. McSwain Sunday.
Miss Odessie McSwain and Mr ,
Fran Goforth took the junior boys
ana girls on a picnic Saturday aft
ernoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hamrick of
Shelby spent Saturday night with
Mrs. Hamrick's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Gamble.
Mr. and Mrs, P. K. Harmon and
'hildren visited Mr. Harmon's
Drother, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Har
mon in Gastonia Friday night.
The Sunday guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Marvin Harmon were. Mrs.
Harmon's father, Mr. Bill Beattie,
if Cherryville. Mr. and Mrs. Grover
Dillon and children, of Cherryville,
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hannon and
children of Gastonia.
STAR AD VS. PAYS
Only At Cohen’s
Are These Values Possible
Hundreds Of People Were Here Thursday And Friday To
• Take Advantage Of These Bargains.
OUR STOCKS ARE COMPLETE IN EVERY DEPART
MENT.
Come! Buy! Save!
CHILDREN'S
El R TRIMMED
WINTER COATS
5 PIECE
CRISS CROSS
CERTAINS
Z Pair*
II i W
SEAMLESS
BED SHEETS
Z For
$1
GENUINE
PUNJAB PRINTS
East Colors.
6 Yards
Extra Special!
Saturday 10:30 a. m I
A Pair Friendly j
Fivr Shoes
$1
36-inch LL
SHEETING
Extra Heavy
30 Yards
$1
PILLOW C ASES
10 For
$1
I* x 36
TI'RKISH TOWELS
10 For
$1
Extra SpecialI
Saturday 2:30 p. m.
MEN’S & BOVS
WORK SHIRTS
4 For
$1
Rayon Bloomers.
Panties And
Step-Ins
4 For
$1
36-INCH
CNBLEACHED
BROADCLOTH
16 Yard'
$1
MEN’S DRESS
SHIRTS
All colors and slies
2 For
2 PAIRS
OVERALLS
I PAIR BOYS AND
1 PAIR MEN'S
$1
36. INCH
LI. SHEETING
30 Yard.
Si
GENUINE
— ROTES —
I Boxes
DRESS PATTERNS
E R E E
WITH ALI.
SILK DRESS
MATERIALS
Cohen Bros. SHNELCBY
The Chase” Given
Try-Out At Fair
'CONTINUED FROM PAUE ONI: i
jers of the chase. The device is the
jonly one of its kind in America and
i will no doubt attract considerable
attention during the fair.
There will be 75 of the finest fox
hounds here from three or four
counties, together with their own
ers and others who enjoy a race,
Summey and Moore, owners of
the Golden Valley kennels shows
their champion hound last night.
Dangers Fancy won last year in the
national championship futurity in
Kentucky and was declared to be
; finest fox hound in America,
j The dog will be on show at the
fair.
Dr. Dorton announced last night
that the "barrier ' system will be
used in starting horses in the races
next week. The barrier system
means that the entries will start
the race when a barrier is lifted.
Heretofore the spectators have
grown somewhat weary waiting for
the drivers to make false starts and
waste considerable time getting oft
Mildred Nelson, An
Atlanta Radio Star
Her Father Lloyd Nelson Was Born
In Shelby. Her Identity
Revealed.
Little Merita, known to radio lis
teners over Atlanta station \VS?
has kept her identity a secret tor
nine months. She sings, donees an
charms a large audience over n.
Atlanta station where she mac
her debut last January as Liil
Merita. Her Identity was kept a set
ret until a few days ago when ii
was announced in the Atlanta Jou:
nal that she is Merita Nelson, elt
ven year old daughter of Mr. a::
Mrs. Lloyd Nelson. Her father is s
j native of Shelby and Is now distric
passenger agent of the Atlanta ai ■
West Point railroad.
Older Shelby citizens will remem
ber her father or perhaps he'
grandfather. Perry Nelson, who op
erated a store here for many year
There were a number of boys in th
Perry family and all have mao
good in the railroad business
J. C. Penney Co.
SHELBY, N. C.
Penney’s Blue Ribbon Winners
Buy Them While They Last
Saturday Features
1 LOT
ARABIAN
PALM
TOILET SOAP
10 Bar?
39 c
1 LOT
REMNANTS
RE-PRICED i
To Close Out At
A Price
1 LOT
RUFFLED
CURTAINS
For quick close-out
29c
PAIR
1 LOT
RADIO TABLE
COVERS
Priced low
39c
EACH
1 LOT
Hand Painted
LUNCH CLOTHS
44 x 44 inches
49c
EACH
1 LOT
WOMEN’S
COTTON HOSE
All sizes
10c
PAIR
1 LOT
WOMEN’S
SMOCKS
To close out
49c
EACH
1 LOT
Women’s
Everyday
OXFORDS
A knockout!
98c
EACH
1
1 LOT
WOMEN’S
PURSES
Real value
49c
KACH
1 LOT
TABLE
COVERS
Damask
54 x 54
98c
EACH
1 LOT
Waterproof
CARD TABLE
COVERS
69c
EACH
1 LOT
BATH RUGS
Extra Heavy
24 x 48 inch
98c
EACH
1 LOT
BATH MATS
Extra Heavy
24 x 36 inch
69c
EACH
1 LOT
FRENCH
BERETS
For the Fair
Pastel colors
39c
EACH
1 LOT
Women’s Rayon
PANTIES
All sizes
29c
EACH
1 LOT
TABLE
COVER
46 x 46 inches
j Remarkable at the price
27c
EACH
1 LOT
Small Boys’
OVERALLS
.Size 2 to 7 Years only
25c
EACH
1 LOT
BOYS’ PLAY
SUITS
2 to 7 years
EACH
WHILE THEY LAST
Extraordinary Purchase!
PART-WOOL
BLANKETS
are only
atPENNEY’S
Why the price is so low: A manufacturer found himself
with 100,000 of these blankets unexpectedly on his hands.
He must self them, and sell them quickly. There are ouly a
few organizations in the country able to handle such a trem
endous quantity ... he selected J. C. Penney Company and
made a very advantageous offer. For tins reason Penney,
•is has, can offer you the best part-wool blanket you’ve e*e*
sees at this entumOy low price 1
BEAUTIFUL BLOCK PLAIDS
IN THE POPULAR COLORS!
    

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