North Carolina Newspapers

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kround Our TOWN
OR
helby SIDELIGHTS
y RENN DRUM.
ST COTTON MILL
CT IN CLEVELAND
Long before Cleveland county w as formed from Gaston and Ruth -
•d counties the first cotton mill in Western North'Carolina was!
• on Buffalo creek at the Old Susan Beam mill place,
rhis information is gleaned from an historic article in The Shelbj
>ras Christmas edition 35 years ago—December 14. 1906. The olc|
r, found among the papers of the late Kemper Kendall, was brought!
■he Star on December 14, 1931 by Dr. A. Pitt Beam.
The portion of the article referring to the first cotton mill follows.!
>ut the year 1813 the first cotton mill erected in Western Nortn1
ilina, if not the first in the state, was erected on Buffalo creek at
Old Susan Beam mill place, by Michael Beam assisted by David War
The writer has often heard Mrs. Elizabeth Anthony, who wtX a
r to Michael Beam and who lived to be nearly 100, say that she
red the rollers of the mill for her brother. The factory was washed 1
t about the time it was completed and much of the machinery was
r found The parties were unable to rebuild.”
tn the same issue of the old paper it was learned that the following
were pastors of the uptown churches: Rev. J. M. Seagle of the Epls- j
llan, Rev. G. D. Herman at Central Methodist (which had Just been!
pleted where Webb theatre now stands). Rev. M. E. Parrish at the
• Baptist, and Rev. James Thomas at the First Presbyterian.
, .. ' . .. ." - ' • ' • ■ ■ : . . - . !
There was a photo,of the court square, taken from the west side.
• where the Confederate monument now stands was one of the young
• of the town in a rubber-tired buggy with two fast-stepping horses
led thereto. There was also a photo of the old Cleveland Springs
l and the merry-go-round there.
rue official county directory, as published, was: L. J. Hoyle, clerk |
Durt; W. H. Eskridge, register of deeds; A. B. Buttle, sheriff; W. R.
ton. treasurer; R. S. Plonk. E. D. Dickson and M. M. Mauney, com
ioners; W. D. Lackey, W. W. Washburn and W. L. Plonk, board of
atlon.
Tha city directory; J. L. Suttle. mayor; W. H. Blanton, Orlardo
i, Bloom Kendall and J. T. Gardner, aldermen; J. D. Lineberger.
nirer; Harvey M. Jetton, chief of police.
* • * * •
Among the merchants and business firms advertising in the big
stmas issue a quarter of a century ago were the following: Shelby
onal bank, W. C. Whisnant. W. P. Gibbons, D. D. Wilkins, First Na
il bank, Paul Webb, Henry E. Kendall. Evans E. McBrayer with the
in "The Fat Clothing Man,” Cleveland Iron Works, Weathers and
1, Hardware, Thompeon-Branton company, C, J. Hamrick and Sons
'• Dellinger’s, Miss Maggie Black, Millinery, T. B. Washburn, Blan
& Kendal], Cleveland Marble Works, James Tlddy, manager; Mar
Blanton's Nursery, Claude Webb & Co., S. L. Gillespie, Millard A.
.'8. W B. Palmer, J. L. Suttle Co., Clyde Webb, Druggist, J. D. Line
er, Lackey-Young company.
The most important social news In the issue was the announcement
he marriage of a young lady, Ethel by name, to a young man who
tw one of the city's best known druggists.
SENT NEED REACHES
IRJTY RELIEF HEAD
A couple of weeks ago J. D. Lineborger was made head of the char
committee to do relief work In Shelby during the winter. A day
o arter The Star containing this news had been published Mr. Line
ar received a card from Duke University reading as follows: “MR.
EBERGER, CHARITY CHAIRMAN: WE’RE BROKE. «N FED HELP
CK. SEND MONEY. JOHN AND SNOOKY.” If by any chance any
does not know who John and Snooky are, they are tire sons of the
•ity chairman and students at Duke.
VELAND HAS MANY
IHOUND FANATICS
That news story from Knoxville the other day informing that it is
hunting time in Dixie certainly had it right.
There are very few nights in the week; at this season when such fel
as Bate Blanton, Rine Doggett, Irvin Allen, Lee Lowman. Pete
•g and numerous others get enough sleep. They’re out somewhere
ning to the wall of a foxhound, music to their ears that cannot be
lied in no opera house—or anywhere else.
It’s funny, too, how enthused and particular they are about their
ldi. They never quit telling you about their good hounds, but they
ir say a word about a bad hound, one that will run a back trail,
ething happened out on a hunt near Shelby the other night which
es it clear what we’re talking about. Two or three of the hunters
young hounds in the race. Naturally the young hounds were not
cted to keep up with the older ones. There was a hot race and the
came scooting right across the road near where the hunters were
ding. Just a few Jumps behind came the older dogs. All through
crowd you could hear shouts—"That’s my hound!” and "There goes
i, too!” After the fox and hounds were some distance across the
, on the other side, up came the young hounds doing their best to
in hearing distance. In the meantime the cunning old fox had
‘d his favorite stunt. After crossing the road he suddenly reversed
self and came back across, Just above the party of men who were
tag the other direction. Soon the older hounds on the other side of
road lost their^hot trail. But about that time two or three of the
ig hounds turned about and came back across the road in full blast
he hunters thought the young hounds were doing that most unfor
ible of foxhound acts, running backtrack. "Wonder whose punk
6 hounds they are?” someone asked in disgust. “Blamed if I know,”
Bate Blanton. “They’re not mine.” Up chimed Rine Doggett, “And
ire not mine either.” And Sheriff Allen and others in the crowd
aimed ownership of hounds that would do such a thing. It sounded
! no one had ever seen the pups before. But about that time the
tg hounds, who had sensed the trick of the fox, got right on his
on the back stretch and had nabbed him in a few minutes. Up came
panting hunters: "That’s my young hound, right there,” said Blan*
"And that’s mine over there,” came back Doggett.
^hd that’s foxhunting for you. Two minutes before no one would
a those young hounds. (Of course we wouldn't say they knew whose
ids they were then). But when a young hound outsmarts the old
and out-tricks reynard on a backtrack, then, my hearties, he’s
i hound.
Y EVEN FILLED
’ THE “FILLMORE”
Yep, Fred Callahan’s middle name is Fillmore. That’s how good
ers of this department are getting in untangling these tangletype
?rs, the pied names. Monday evening they figured out the pied
es of three farmers and of three business men in tecord time
TTie solution follows:
UCMIIORRAWLED—William Crowdcx
BBT ATLNANOE—BATE BLANTON
BBHOOCNR—Cobb Horn.
The three farmers. Now the three business men;
RIDE-MORE-FALL-AN-FALL—Fred Fillmore Callahan
HDIGEERRRAUOOL—Roger Laughrldge
YES-M-FINK-CENT-US—Festus McKinney
Jiiu Magness had them al! untangled by five o’clock Monday after- |
noon. Other* who unjumbled them in a hurry included Ralph Short.'
Mrs. Rush Thompson. Jimmy Blanton, anti Dick Branton
Snatch the kin us out of these
MEW-CAT-FULL
AL-STOP-YER-RHR
VF.RNON-THAY-LIO
ICE-REP-TBR
SON-RUNS-WHAT-TURN-BMb
The first name was contributed by an anonymous "Bad Boy It is.
the name, he says, of “a nice-looking fellow who works for a local re-1
tail firm anti seldom wears a hat.'* Zatso? The four others were sub
mitted by a man whose name Iras bee* ’mjumbled heretofore. They’re 1
all Shelby business or professional men. or manufacturers. The full (
name of the professional man (two given iuuaes> is listed.
A crip, says you? Oli yeah! .
Nobody’s
Business j
By Gi E McGEE
Encouraghg Hunger.
There's so rm ch preparation go
ing on to care for the needy this
winter, some of the said "needy ;
are selling their corn and peas and i
potatoes and buyin gasoline, inner;
tubes and other r-a! necessities |
with the money. W - are making soj
much noise about "relief," we are j
encouraging certain folks to look;
forward to it that could get along,
without it if we didn't have it.
New York, Dec. 15.--Uverpool,
came in lower than due in syinpa- j
thy with the pound sterling and j
New Orleans responded with an ad-!
vance of 1 point to a new low lor
the week. Spinners takings were
less than they “took" not long ago.
If it rains too much and the boil
weevil is extremely plentiful, and
many freshets visit our cdton
patches, and a late spring and an
early summer and mild winter hap
pen. we predict a shorter crop,
therefore, we advise holding as long
as possible.
Something to Wear Out.
1.—The newest tiling out in wear
ing apparel is the ‘'Gnancti Ensem
ble” i pronounced Gon-dy On-som
bull.) and folks, if this depression
keeps up, it's going to be the only
garment we will be able to wear. It
consists of 10 yards of cheese (cot
ton, of course) cloth that now costs
2 cents a yard, t o hemming or haw
ing or stitching or button-holing is
required.
2.—This Ghandi tog is just as
fine for women as it, is for men. It
is easy to install on any human be*
ing, regardless of form, shape, de
sign, or other posture, and only one
rise will be manufactured for - all
ages and genchrs, and that alone
will make it popular. No more dress
makers and tailors will be required
to help us keep ip with the Jones.
_ *
3.—Men Should put on this Ghan
dl rob*' Jjfe the following manner
Wrap the end nearest to your head
around your neck once, then pass
the other end under your left arm
and around your waist 3 times,
catch the dangling portion firmly in
the left hand and fetch It up be
twixt, your, 2 legs and fold around
your hips gently and tie in a knot
and let H swing wherever It will
swing best.
4— Women must observe the fol
lowing rule in donning this Glian
di rag. Catch both ends in both
hands, wrap the center of the cloth
around your chest once, as far south
as necessary, then permit both ends
to hang down as far as convenient,
then pinch the duds into a fold and
entwine around the nether limbs
loosely and anchor the residue on
the anatomy half-way betwixt the
head and feet, viz: on 4he hips.
Leave off shoes, hose, and—■well,
you’ve been leaving nearly every
thing off anyhow , so there you are.
Athens. Ga., Dec. 2, 1831:
Dear Gee McGee:
I have ben reading your nobody's
business for several years, and must
say that I like some of it. I Have
discovered that you can be serious
occasionally—if you try, according
to reports, you arc a business man.
so please tell us when you think
business conditions will be bftter.
Yours for the low-down. ”
Harbin . Green.
Dear M. Green:
As everybody but me has prophe
sied when good times will return it
might not be out of place to take
a try at it and thus carry out your
request, so here goes:
1. —When cotton goes to 12 cents
or higher, so that the cotton farm
er can sell his product at a profit
times will be better up North—as
cotton grower will have some mon
ey to spend to help put industry
back to work.
I . —
2. —Conditions will be better in the
j South when the western wheal
! grower is paid a dollar a bushel for
' hts wheat—so that he may have
some money with which to buy cot
' ton goods and thus keep the cotton
j mills running on full time—and
;then cotton mill labor will have
“First President” I
i I— IWIMI—■" ' ■ v ■
Selected from among ninny candi
dates an the exact "double” of
George Washington In physical
measurement*, to say nothing of a
strong facial resemblance. Elis
Worth Woods, of Klchmond, Va., will
play the role of the "Father of Ills
Country” in the historical film be
ing made for the George Washing
Ion Vlcentennlal commission. Woods j
is a descendant of Colonel Jons-1
than Woods, a rrsident of Virginia !
county, where Washington was born, j
and an officer in the Revolutionary j
War.
He new lletier.
. ._... |
"So you're a salesman now', eh. j
i Sambo? Do you stand behind the >
products you sell?”
No Mih. I don't.”
"Why. Sam, I'm surprised at you. j
You should always stand behind <
your product What are you selling? i
"Mules.”
penty money to spend lor broad,
i 3.—Hard times will cunloose, up
East, wheii they find It possible to
pay a reasonable price for raw ma
terials—to sell back to the producer
at a profit when manufactured—
and by so doing—keep their factor
ies and shops running. Low prices
will ruin a country quicker than |
any other scourage.
4 —The bonus didn't help much.
Building programs keep machinery
busy and permits men to remain
idle. Farm relief don't relieve.
Government, aid aids the govern-1
ment when they get Interest for It j
A nice, long drought, or a nation
wide crop pest to reduce production
might help—but the use of a little
gray-matter by the masses would be
worthwhile. We've got to consume
twice as much as we produce for 3
years and then things will hum.
Yours lor the humming.
Gee McGee.
Gins
ALL PAID FOR
IN ADVANCE
Oooiih
(J 1932
CHF.I STM AS
SAVINGS CLUB
FOR hundreds of families Christmas will he
merrier than ever this year! Why? Because
the spirit of giving will have full play. Gifts
will be paid for in advance by our Christmas
Savings Club. You can begin now to provide
for your 1932 Christmas. The First National
Bank will hely. you save a little every week in
a way that you won't miss it.
First National Bank
A ’- • - '
t
A Final Clean-Up
JUST 7 MORE BIG DAYS OF COHEN’S
Christmas Sale
YOUR LAST CHANCE TO SECURE AN HONEST-TO
GOODNESS BARGAIN AND CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT
SALE PRICES!
EVERY COAT AN!)
DRESS MUST GO AT
\ Price
A'ool Coats and Dresses
$8.88 Snort and Dress
$4*44
$14.95 Coats and Dresses
$7.88
$21.50 Coats and Dressy
m.s*
A tail bciccl.u.i < . ...^ ics
end sizes, 14 to 52,
EXTRA SPECIA
A» Long As They Lai,
$5 Ladies’ Silk Crepe
DRESSES.
Come to Cohen’s for "The
Huffiest Values Ever
Offered In Shelby.
SATURDAY
ALL DAY
ABSOLUTELY
FREE
10-Ouart
GALVANIZED
BUCKETS
With Every $1
Purchase
LADIES BRAND NEW
NOVELTY
DRESS & S^ORT
SHOES
Pumps, Bicapfc Ties sad
Oxfords;
Included are all our
Friedman - Shelby Ox
fords, values to $ 4 00
FLORSHEIM &
FRIENDLY FIVE
SHOES
$687 “ $3
.87
Every Wanted Style.
Sizes 5 to 12. .
Widths AAA to EEEE.
Men’s 220 Weight Over
alls. Extra qual- A Q
ity, triple stitch T:*/ C
Men’s Broadcloth Dress
Shirts, AH
All Sizes __ He • C
36-Inch Dr,ess Prints—
Saturday, ^
10:00 A. M., Yd. DC
Men’s Extra Heavy, Two
Pocket Work Shirts. —.
Genuine Defiance, Cham
bray and other A A
good makes __ C
12 Momme P u r e Silk
Pongee. 35c 1 A
value, yard __ 1 %J C
36-in. Travel Tweeds and
Suitings. 29c 1 A
value, yard 11/C
Spool Thread, ■ r*
2 for_— - DC
Boys’ 220 Wt. QQ
Overalls O %/ C
Men’s 16-:n. High Top
Boots. Solid d*0.98
Leather_..._
All-Wool Tweeds — A
75c value,
Tard__
49c
GIVE HIM A CURL
SUIT
just Wliat Xou Have Been
Waiting Tor!
CEMir'F
CURLiE SUITS
DBASTICALLV BED! D
Guaranteed All-Wool Blue
_a new suit W they
tade—
$ll-«
All sizes. 34 to 46
One special group of AU-W'ool
Hard - Finished Worsteds.
Suits that sold last week as
high as $18.**, now—
$11-87
Plenty to select from.
Homespuns, twists and tweeds
-just what you need for
Christmas. Curlee suits which
sold up to $2150. now
$17-»7
Ml Wool Cheviot Top Coats,
Iw0Ml5 and Camel Matures
$9.87
ODe (roup All wool Orercoau
Values to $12.50—
$6/97 _
— bcv and save —
COHEN BROS.
NEVER KNOWINGLY UNDERSOLD
    

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