North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
.THE KEKIJUIMANS YtiBi&JjX, HEWlTVitU, JN. U., IIUUAI, it,
LOOKING AT
WASHINGTON
, -. . .
By HUGO . SIMS
THREE FLEETS ON PAPER.
MANY NEW SHIPS COMING.
HUGE DEFENSE BUDGET.
ACTUAL SPENDING SMALL.
THE DEBT AND TAXES.
ARSENAL FOR DEMOCRACY.
FOUR GREAT ESSENTIALS.
NEW DEFENSE LEADERS.
A CALL TO ALL CITIZENS.
State Cooperates In New Safety Effort:
Reorganization of the United
States Navy into three fleets, effec
tive February 1st, may not affect
the distribution of more than 300
war vessels now in service, but it will
mean something in the distribution of
the units when the Navy is doubled
by the addition of nearly 400 units
now building.
With the main fleet in the Pacific,
stationed at Hawaii, the Navy has
maintained a patrol force of 125
vessels in the Atlantic and an Asi
atic squadron in the Far East, in tht
Philippines and China. The battle
ships are at Honolulu, with the ex
ception of two or three in the Atlan
tic. In the Far East are some new
cruisers, destroyers, submarines and
eunboats.
The ships being built for th
Navy will more than double tne com
batant units of every type, except
submarines. The 17 battleships, 12
aircraft carriers, 48 cruisers, 170
destroyers and 82 submarines will
represent an addition that is equal to
any existing ;iavy in the world today.
In fact, when completed, they will be
1 Tanonooo Tinw aS it X-
ists plus all units known to be under
construction.
The President's budget message
followed expectations, proposing ex
penditures of $17,485,049,000 in the
year beginning the first day of next
July. About two-thirds of the total
is for defense, with from two to five
additional billions likely to be re
quested for all-out assistance to the
fighting democracies. The expendi
tures will result it is estimated, in a
deficit of more than $9,000,000,000,
thus increasing the public debt to
an all-time peak of more than
$58,000,000,000.
In connection with national de
fense the President pointed out that
expenditures during the last six
months amounted to about $1,750,
OOO.fflH). This is a small sum com-
f pared with the "huge appropriations
an read v made by Congress. Actual
expenditures, however, will increase i
sharply during the next half-year
period, being estimated at nearly)
five billion dollars. This will bring
us to the beginning of the 1942 fiscal
year during which such expenditures
will, leap to nearly 11 billion dollars.
The President recounted the de
fense program, including appropria
tions, authorizations and recommen
dations, covering the period from
June, 1940, and including estimates
for the fiscal year that will end June
30, 1942, showing a total of $28,480,
000,000. The Army gets $13,704,
000,000, the Navy $11,587,000,000,
industrial expansion requires $1,902,
000,000, and other defense activities
takes up $1,287,000,000.
In discussing the national debt the
Chief Executive pointed out that na
tional income had increased more
than 30 billion dollars above the de
pression depth and that, in the same
period, annual federal interest
charges increased by only 400 mil
lion dollars. He declared that the
bonds of the United States are the
"safest securities in the world," ana
that "our tax burden is stifll moderate
compared to that of most other peo
ple." Mr. Roosevelt opposes a pay-as-you
go basis for defense expendi
tures, although admitting that there
was no agreement on how much
should be borrowed. He believes
that the drastic and restrictive taxes
mat wuuiu ue uct;csoai y w muuivc j
pay-as-you go defense program would ,
interfere with the full use of ourj
productive capacities and restrict
general consumption which, he thinks,
is inadvisable "as long as unused
capacity is available and as long as
idle labor can be employed."
The President's message on the
state of the Union gave official ut
terance to national policy, already
underway and generally approved by
the people. Defying the dictators,
he proclaimed our unity with the
cause of the nations fighting aggres
sion and insisted that the role for
this country is that of an arsenal to
supply munitions and war supplies
of many kinds to the nations at war
with the aggressors. He took a firm
standi against peace by appeasement
or negotiation, warning the nation
against those who "would clip the
wings of the American eagle in order
to feather their own nests."
He looked forward to a world
founded upon four essential human
freedoms1: (1) freedom of speech and
expression; (2) freedom of every
person to worship God in his own
. way; (8) freedom from want, or eco
nomic understandings which will se
cure to every nation a healthy peace
time life f or fyi inhabitants, and (4)
freedom 'from fear, or world-wiu.
A St
The dramatic safety appeal shown above will appear on North Carolina highways under the di
rection of Highway Safety Director Ronald Hocutt, in cooperation with local outdoor advertising com
panies and the Esso Safety Foundation. The poster, according to Hocutt, is a plea not only for safe
driving, but for equal care on the part of pedestrians, who made up nearly 40 per cent of the 1940
traffic fatalities in North Carolina. The poster is from a painting by Hayden Hayden, noted Ameri
can artist, who prepared it as his contribution to the joint safety move.
reduction of armaments to such a
point and in such a thorough fashion
that no nation will be in a position!
to commit an act of physical aggres
sion against any neighbor.
The newly created Office of Produc
tion Management gives William S.
Knudsen and Kidney Hillman, to
gether with Secretaries Stimson and
Knox, almost complete power to su
pervise the nation's mammoth de
fense program. With the prominent
industrialist and labor leader working
together there is reason to expect
unusual cooperation between labor
and industry. The President says he
has delegated the power as far as
possible and that he will not inter
fere although he would advise if re
quested to do so.
The four members of the new set
up immediately requested the "active,
aggressive and enthusiastic coopera
tion of every man, woman and child
in the United States" in order to
make America an arsenal "adequate
to the successful defense of demo
cracy and freedom." They warned
industry to be satisfied with a nor
mal return for new capital required
and repress any "subconscious unex
pressed hopes for wartime profits."
Labor was assured that no sacrifices
would be asked unless "matched by
a corresponding sacrifice of capital"
and warned that a totalitarian vic
tory will destroy the hard-won
rights of labor and that "both capital
and labor will become the involuntary
vassals of an all-powerful State."
HURDLETOWN
Mr. and Mrs. W. Q. Hurdle and
children, Daryl and Eleanor Glyn,
visited Mrs. Hurdle's brother and
sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan
Jordan, of Camden, on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Symons ana
Mrs. Z. D. White visited Mr. and
Mrs. John Hall, of Winfall, Sunday
afternoon.
Mr. and, Mrs
children visited
Twine 'Sunday.
Miss Shirley
N.
Mr.
S. Hurdle ana
and Mrs. O. K.
Hurdle
spent" the
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Ernest
Stallings, at Cumberland.
Mrs. Nellie Sumner and Emily
Anne are visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
Harrell, Jr., in Norfolk, Va. ,
Mrs. C. M. Hurdle and daughter,
Shirley, visited Mrs. J. H. "Scaff on
Wednesday.
Lee Ferrell, U. S. A., Camp Oar
lisle, Pa., visited his cousin, Mrs. C
M. Hurdle, recently.
Mrs. Hazel Combs, of Elizabeth
City, spent a few days last week
with her aunt, Mrs. Nellie Sumner.
O. K. Twine went to Durham on
Friday for treatment at Duke Hos
pital. HERTFORD CLUB MEETS
The Home and Garden Club of
Hertford met Friday evening at the
home of Mrs. W. N. Tucker, with
Mrs. G. R. Tucker as assisting
hostess.
The meeting was opened by sing
ing "Love's Old Sweet Song", after
which Mrs. E. L. Reed offered prayer.
Mrs. W. D. Landing, secretary, read
the minutes of the last meeting.
The Collect was repeated in unison.
Miss Frances Maness, demonstra
tion agent, talked on "Farm and
Family Living."
After the business session dainty
refreshments were served by the
hostesses.
Those present included Mesdames
W. N. Tucker, G. R. Tucker, E. L.
Reed, C. M. Harrell, H. G. Barclift,
Mark . Hathaway, W. D. Landing, Z.
A. Harris, Norman Elliott, Hurley
Hoffier, B. T. Wood, C. A. Murray,
Wilson Reed, Seymoure Chappell,
Josiah Elliott, J. S. McNider and N.
H. Medlin, and Miss Frances Maness.
National Peanut
Week Scheduled
January 23 - 31
An attempt to move 50,000 tons of
peanuts into the channels of edible
consumption will be made during Na
tional Peanut Week, scheduled Janu
ary 23-31. H. W. Taylor, Extension
marketing specialist of N. C. State
College, says that this event is de
signed to help peanut growers of
North Carolina and other states to
dispose of a record-sized crop at
profitable prices.
"Last year a National Peanut
Week campaign resulted in 25,000
tons of peanuts being moved into edi
ble consumption, thereby greatly in
creasing the income of Tar Heel
peanut producers," Taylor declared.
"This year there is even greater need
for a campaign of this type since U.
S. Department of Agriculture esti
mates place the 1940 peanut crop in
the Nation at 1,511,150,000 pounds
28 percent larger than in 1939."
Taylor said that the National Pea
nut Council is sponsoring this year's
"week." They have been assured of
the cooperation of leading organiza
tions of merchants, transportation
agencies, and dealers in peanut pro
ducts. These include the Southeast
ern Chain Store Council, of which P.
D. May of LeG range is the North
Carolina representative. May says
that the chain stores will feature
special window displays and other
promotional material.
"Peanut production," the Extension
specialist declared, "is an important
part of the agricultural economy of
North Carolina. If the public will
lend its support to National Peanut
Week, the farmers will be benefitted
and 'what helps the farmers helps
general business.'
"The Growers Peanut Cooperative,
with headquarters at Ahoskie, has
placed its stamp of approval on this
campaign. Mayon Parker, presiaent
of the cooperative, has urged ail
members to support the campaign,"
Taylor concluded.
SNOW HILL NEWS
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Harrell visited
Mr. and Mrs. G. J. BarcQift, at Nix
onton, Sunday afternoon.
Miss Annie Mae Matthew, oi
Hertford, visited her parents, Mi.
and. Mrs. M. M. Matthews, during the
week-end.
Ronald Harrell, small son , of Mr.
and Mrs. Eddie Harrell, is improving
after an attack of bronchial pneu
monia. Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hudson and son,
Billy, of Newport News, Va., visited
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Lane during
the week-end.
Mr. and Mrs. Moody Harrell at
tended services at Woodville Baptist
Church 'Sunday afternoon.
Barbara Lee Sawyer, of Old Neck,
spent a few days recently with hei
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. D. M.
Cartwright.
Elmer Wood visited Mrs. Wally
Knight, in Norfolk, Va., Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Benton and
family, of Old Neck, visited Mrs.
Mary A. Keaton and Mr. and Mrs.
J. T. Wood Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. L. S. White, of Hert
ford, visited Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Ben
ton on Sunday.
Conrad Brocho of .St. Louis inquir
ed of police how he could get rid of
a wife who was "never sociable."
the farmer, who 5 combines"' livestock
production with cotton .. or tobacco
growing will benefit Jhe, most" -
Prof. Hostetler says that the
employment wijl help the live-stock-cotton
farmer in two ways, namely:
Workers can utilize more cotton, ana
they can consume more of the live
stock products that are products
through the feeding of cottonseed
by-products.
In this connection, the State Col
lege leader cited a recent Estimate
that one hour's wage received by the
average American will buy 2.1
pounds of beef, whereas the same
amount of labor will earn an Eng
lishman only 1.4 pounds of beef, a
German 0.9 of a pound, and a Rus-r
sian 0.3 of a pound when meat is
available, at any price.
"The basic 1941 farm outlook indi
cates that reductions in unemploy
ment, coupled with increased earn
ings of those who have not been
classed as unemployed, should raise
the demand by consumers for such
farm products as meat, dairy and
poultry products, vegetables and
some fruits. Our North Carolina
cotton and tobacco farmers might as
well face these facts and diversify
their operations," Hostetler declare 1.
' In conclusion, the animal husbr -man
suggested that farmers get . i
touch with their, county farm agema
and discuss ; with these representa
tives of the State College Extension
Service the best types of livestock
to raise for the particular community
in which they live. ' ,
EPIDEMIC OF v v
COLD SYMPTOMS
666 Liquid or 666 Tablets with '668
Salve or 666 Nose Drops generally"
relieves cold symptoms the first
day. adV
WHEN YANKEE CLIPPERS 1
RULED THE SEAS 1 , "
Opening chapters of a series of
thrilling tales about days of glorious .
adventure that will never come again
with illustrations in full color.
Don't miss this feature in - the I
January 19th issue of '
Th Ampririin iVppklv
the big magazine distributed with the (
Baltimore American
On Sals at All NewHstard
AUTO AND PERSONAL LOANS
See Us Personally Before Purchasing an
Automobile. No Investigation Charge. y
PERSONAL LOANS FOR EVERY NEED
HERTFORD BANKING COMPANY
MEMBER FDIC
HERTFORD, N. C.
J
livestock Outlook
For 1941 Is Bright
A bright outlook for livestock
farmers in 1941 is indicated by the
increased defense activity, says Prof.
E. H. Hostetler, (State College animal
husbandman. "People eat more meat
when they are working and earning
regularly," he pointed out, "and
WE CARRY A
COMPLETE LINE
of
Poultry Supplies
FEEDERS AND FOUNTAINS FOR
BABY CHICKS AND POULTRY
Hertford Hardware i Supply Company
HERTFORD, N. C.
Benton Named To
Three Committees
In Lower House
Representative J. T. Benton has
received appointment to serve v as a
member of three committees in the
present session of the Legislature.
Mr. Benton will serve on the Agri
cultural, Commercial Fisheries and
Oyster Committees.
TWO FAMOUS HORSES
BELIEVED USED AS FOOD
Paris. Two of France's most fam
ous stallions. - Moil. Talisman and
Clairvoyant, which belonged to
wealthy Argentine, duorda Martine
&K Ho, are listed as "missing in ac
tion" since June ami are believed to
have been killed and eaten during the
big exodus from Paris.
TAYLOR THEATRE
EDENTON, N. C.
WE HAVE THE SHOWS
Friday, Jan. 17
Lum and Abner and
Frances Langford in
"DREAMING OUT LOUD
Saturday, Jan. 18
Don Red Barry in
"WYOMING WILDCAT" ,
Also 3 Stooges Comedy and
- "Dr. Satan" No. 5
Sunday, Jan. 19
Fredric March and Betty Field in
"VICTORY'
A Story of the South Sea Ialea
Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 20-21
Robert Taylor, Ruth Hussey and
Walter Pidgeon in
"FLIGHT COMMAND"
Matinee 10c and 25c
Night 10c and 3Se This Picture
Wednesday, Jan. 22
Double Feature 10c and 20c
Laurel and Hardy in i 4
"FLYING DEUCES" 1
. Sitmey Toler in ' -"MURDER
OVER NEW YORp
1L1
Simon's Sale Closes January 25
Don't miss this opportunity of SAVING at our AFTER-INVETfc t
TORY SALE. We have marked all items for CLEARANCE and
you have 8 more BIG days to shop and save. Visit our store this
week-end and inspect the many bargains awaiting you.
LADIES VINTEQ COATS GREATLY QEDUCED!
SALE UN'S SUITS
14.95-17.9
Values to $22.50
SALELAD1ES' DRESSES
$1.69 - $2.69
$3.69 - $4.59
Values to $6.95 v;
MEN'S
DRESS SHIRTS
LADIES' i
SUEDE SHOES
79c
$1.49
LADIES' and CHILDREN'S
WASH DRESSES
49c
Fast Colors , ,
Hundreds of Oilier Bargains at Se!o Prices
Si
i ; - v. t y, i' 'i ft' ii
"STORE OF VALUES" HERTFORD, N. C
r
    

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