North Carolina Newspapers

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1 ' ' THE PERQUIMANS WEEKLY, HERTFORD, N. C, fEIDAY, APEIL . M . r,,.,,,,.;,,., , ,. ..r"- , ". r..?
TBI '
Perquimans Weekly
Published even Friday by The
Perquimans Weekly, a partner
hip consisting of Joseph G.
Campbell and Max R. Campbell,
at Hertford, N. C.
MAX CAMPBELL Editor"
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year 11.25
Six Months.
.75
'North Caratoai
53 ASSOCIATE
r miss AssociAiicw 'Ji
Entered as second class matter
November 15, 1984, at postoffice
at Hertford, North Carolina, un
der the Act of March 1879.
Advertising rates furnished by
request.
Cards of thanks, obituaries,
resolutions of respect, etc., will
be charged for at regular adver
tising rates.
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1941
It's Getting To
Be A Habit
Students at the Perquimans High
School, as well as the faculty and
residents of the County, can well be
proud of the members of the High
School debating team. For the third
straight year the members of this
school team have brought honor to
the local school by winning the right
to participate in the debates held
each year at Chapel Hill.
This is an honor that The Weekly
doubts can be equaled by any school
in the entire State. Congratula
tions to the debaters and to the
school for having such students that
can make a habit of being victorious.
SO WHAT?
By WHATSO
Help The Crippled
Children
The Perquimans County Chapter of
Crippled Children Society of North
Carolina will shortly make its ap
peal to t'ne people of this county for
contributions to sustain and enlarge
the work of this organization.
Certainly, every adult will serious
ly consider this opportunity to share
in giving new hope to hundreds of
unfortunate children whose pathetic
plight fails to move us to more gen
erous gifts merely because we do not
come into direct contact with their,
need.
Parents of children who happen to
be sound of limb can express their
gratitude by making a contribution
to ease the affliction of some less
fortunate child.
Every person can help when this
drive opens, so let's get ready now
to make this a success year for the
society that spends its time to aid
those crippled children.
Sun-rise In Berlin
Japan's sun seems to be rising in
Berlin. The most significant aspect
of the Matsuoka visit to the Nazi
capital is the effort of the stage
managers there to make that visit
appear important. Evidently the
Nazis are beginning to look upon
Japan as a successor to Italy, whose
nuisance value has lately been au
greatly reduced by Greek and British
initiative.
Japan's promotion would be
prompted by world developments
during the last few years, in any
case. When the Nazis first sought
the collaboration of the Fascists,
Italy was useful to Germany as a
nuisance to Britain. Now what the
Nazis need is a partner that can di
vert the United States.
If Mr. Matsuoka is not careful he
will find his visit which he is
making in the hope of finding out
what Japan can get out of the Axis
turned into an opportunity for the
Nazis to give new directions to Ja
pan as to how best to serve Nazi in
terests in the Pacific. That, of,
course, was the role assigned by
Berlin to Tokyo when the Triple
Axis was formed. Mr. Matsuoka
understands these things, of course.
But he also wants to know what
there is in it for Japan. This busi
ness of acting as a target for the
wrath of a great Power, as Italy has
done, can be dangerous, as Italy now
knows. If Japan's role on the Axis
is to annoy the United States, that
role can have calamitous economic
effects in Japan even if it produces
no more open conflict. One under
stands why Japanese leaders felt
someone .should go and talk things
over in Berlin.
The Nazis can perhaps help per
sonally the Japanese politicians re
sponsible for Japan's position on the
Axis by recognizing the Japanese
sponsored Chinese Central Govern
ment. This would remove one cause
of skepticism about the Axis in Ja
pan. They can also promise to help
Japan reach an understanding with
Russia.- But this promise must -be
predicated on Germany's being able
to influence Moscow to play a game
that has Just resulted in some set
' backs for Russia. ,
Perhaps Mr. Matsuoka had already
learned what ha needed to know be
fore he arrived In Berlin- For, on
,, the way he stopped over at Moscow,
; where the biggest of the JJazl prom
, "ises would have" t Ws, cashed.
Christ! Science
NELL, THE LONE WARRIOR,
WILL NOT HUSH. HUSH. The
supine incompitence of the State
Board of Education needs to pe
brought to the attention of the vot
ers of the State. Miss Nell Battle
Lewis appears to be the one public
servant with sufficient sense of hon
or and sufficient courage to do it
In five succeeding issues of her
column, INCIDENTALLY, she has
held Jule B. Warren's elementary
text book on the History of North
Carolina up to scorn. She has shown
it to be not an accurate history of
the State but rather a sloppy parody
on the same. She has shown it to be
the work of a man apparently incap
able of the proper use of the Eng
lish language. So far as we can
gather from the press no other
teacher of history in the Public
School System of this great State
has shown any interest in the mat
ter. No County Superintendent of
Schools has made a peep. Miss Nell
battles alone! For one dauntless
battler we are thankful, but why is
it that the teachers and county su
perintendents of the State do not
flock to her banner? Jobs, perhaps
We would not be surprised if the
State Board of Education did not ex
ercise considerable political, in
fluence! Whatever the answer to
Miss Lewis' loneliness may be, it is
a terrible commentary on our Public
School System if she is the only one
with the intelligence and courage to
stand up and fight against an ob
vious wrong.
Often we have heard from those
who ought to know that the text
book game is "some racket." We do
not know. We do wonder. The si
lence that comes from the State
Board of Education in the face of
criticism makes us wonder all the
more. "'i
THE STATE BOARD OF EDU
CATION IS UNDER FIRE and it
better speak up. The fact is that
the text book under discussion was
accepted by the State Board against
th3 recommendation of the Elemen
tary Textbook Commission. We do
not know who the members of this
Commission may be. We do know
who the members of the State Board
adopting the Warren book are:
Former Governor Clyde R. Hoey.
Former Lieutenant-Governor W.
P. Horton.
Secretary of State Thad Eure.
State Treasurer Charles M. John
son. State Auditor George Ross Pou.
State Superintendent of Public In
struction Clyde A. Erwin.
Attorney General Harry McMullan
Are any 'of these men qualified to
pass on the merits of a text book or.
any subject for the elementary
grades or any other grades for thai
matter? fcWe do not assume to know
the answer to that question though
we do have a large sized suspicion!
We- do know, however, that it is dis
tinctly up to the Board to explain,
and explain in detail, why they re
jected the book recommended by the
Elementary Textbook Commission
and accepted the Warren book. It is
seldom that all the right of any
question is all on one side. We
would like to know just how much
right there is to support the action
taken by the State Board. If they
do not speak we shall be bound to
feel that all the right is on the side
of the Textbook Commission.
THIS IS NOT A QUESTION
JUST FOR MISS LEWIS AND THE
STATE POLITICIANS. It is a
question that comes right home to
every County in the State and every
school district. Here in Perquimans
County it is a question of interest to
every citizen. Every citizen would
like to know what those in charge of
our local schools think about it.
What, in fact, is the attitude of our
County Superintendent of School?
What is the opinion of those who are
teaching the subject?
SHIM SCHOOL lESSOIIuy;
CHRIST PROMISES POWER
International Sunday School
for April 6, 1941
Lesson
shall
Holy
Golden Text. "But ye
receive power, when the
Spirit is come upon you; and ye
shall be my witness both In
Jerusalem, and in all Judea and
Samaria, and unto the utter
most parts of the earth." Acts.
Lesson Text Acts 1:1-12
WOMAN'S SOCIETY MEETS
The regular meeting of the Wom
an's Society of Christian Service ol
Woodland Church was held at the,
home of Mrs. W. H. Cartwright, on
Route Three. The president, Mrs.
Mary Keaton, presided over the bus
iness session. Mrs. Eddie Harrell
had charge of the .devotional, using
as her topic 'Sharing for the Health
of the World," and reading from
Matthew 5:13-16. "We've a Story
To Tell" was sung. Prayer was of
fered by Mrs, Harrell.
The program was led by Mrs.
Eddie Harrell. Her subject was "In
vesting Our Heritage for Health in
the World." The following parts
were taken by members: Africa, Mrs.
Eddie Harrell; China, Mrs. Jack
Benton; India, Mrs. Ralph Harrell;
Korea, Mrs. Mary Keaton. The Rev
J. D. Cranford dismissed the group
with prayer. ,
The hostess served ambrosia with
pound cake. :
Those 'present were Mesdames
Jack Benton, . Eddie Harrell, Ralph
Harrell, Elmer Wood, Carson Jordan.
George Jordan, Mary Keaton, and W.
H. Cartwright, Miss Blanche Cart
wright, and the Rev. and Mrs. J, D.
Cranford.
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Born to Mr. t and Mrs. Wallace
Baker, of Whlteston, on Monday,
March 17, a son, Mother and baby
are doing nicely.
During the last three months of
1940 and the first three months of
this year, we have studied Luke's
Gosepel, written by a man who was
not a companion of Jesus. The Gos
pels of Matthew and John were
written by apostles and Mark's gos
pel is supposed to have been furnish
ed with facts by Peter, hence these
three may be said to have been the
products of eye-witnesses.
Luke, however, was eminently
qualified to write the history he did.
His first book, the Gospel, has beef
called "the most beautiful book in
the world," containing many passages
not given by the other writers. The
Gospel gives an account of the life
of Jesus, closing with his death and
ascension. Obviously, the next step
was to compile a record relating how
the early church was established and
inspired to become the world-wide
factor it attained.
The Book of Acts was also written
by Luke, and supplies us with a re
cord of Christianity's early years.
The similarity of its composition and
the fact that it was dedicated to
Theophilus, just as the third gospel,
causes its authorship to be definite
ly assigned to Luke. Luke was a
physician, a Greek, who attended
Paul on many of his journeys, keep
ing him fit and witnessing his glor
ious missionary endeavors. A part
of the book uses the first person
"we," indicating exactly when and
where Luke was an eye witness. Luke
evidently intended to write a third
book but we have no trace of it.
The book opens with the account
of the ascension of Jesus., His dis
ciples wanted to know his plans but
he promised them power and commis
sioned them to be his witnesses, both
in their immediate community and
throughout the world. -"What the
disciples asked of Christ was a com
plete roadway of the future," says
W. J. Dawson. "We also would like
a complete chart of truth. The reply
of Christ is: 'It is not for you to
know,' and the reply may be inter
preted two ways. He clearly means
.that this kind of knowledge is not
within the competence of man, man
being what he is and his mental con-
stitution what it is. And it means
also that this kind of knowledge is
not only unnecessary to man, but it
would be hurtful to him. In a great
campaign offering many, battles, and
full of new movements dictated by
new occasions, it is not necessary that
every private soldier should be in
complete possession of the plans of
his leaders. It would be of no ad
vantage to him, and in all probability
it would prove to be a great hind
rance and disadvantage."
The next picture we have is of the
disciples gathered together in the
upper room at Jerusalem, a number
of those who had been prominently
associated with Jesus are mentioned
and on the day of Pentecosts they re
ceived the mysterious power of the
Holy Spirit No one can explain
this in natural terms but it brought
power and enthusiasm to oie dis
ciples.
Immediately afterwards, . Peter
preached a marvelous sermon. His
subject was Christ, and he proclaim
ed him as the Savior of mankind,
setting forth his deeds and words.
In answer to the question of the
people, he advised them to repent
and have faith in Jesus. As a result
3,000 souls accepted his invitation.
"No less marvelous than the gift
of tongues or the eloquence of Peter
or the conversion of a multitude was
the conduct of those who accepted
Christ as their Savior," says Prof.
Charles R. Erdman. "Many persons
seem to suppose that Pentecostal
power is attested by striking gifts or
ability in public speech; its best proof
is found in the daily life of the be
liever. These early Christians con
tinued to seek for instruction from
the men who really knew the Lord;
they enjoyed the spiritual fellowship,
they observed the sacrament which
reminded them of the Savior's death;
they met frequently for prayer and
praise; they were cheerful and con
tented; they loved one another fer
vently that they Sold their posses
sions and parted them to all, accord
ing as any man had need. The Spirit
of Christ bound these believers into
one body, united in faith and love and
hope; and thus it is not strange that
Pentecost is commonly regarded ac
the true birthday of the Christian
church; nor is it surprising that such
men were held in 'favor with all the
people' and that additions were made
to their numbers 'day by. day'."
BIBLE CLASS MEETING
The Margaret Towe Bible Class
held its regular monthly meeting on
Thursday night at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Talmage Lewis. The presi
dent, Fletcher Bundy, called the
meeting to order and was in charge
of the devotional. The minutes of
the last meeting were read and ap
proved. Business matters were dis
cussed. A Card of Thanks from Mr.
and Mrs. Henry Ownley expressing
appreciation of the gifts presented
them by the class was read. Mr.
and Mrs. Ownley recently lost their
home through fire.
The meeting was closed with ttie
hymn, "Can the World See Jesus In
You?"
Misses Alice and Gracie Ferrell
were in charge of the recreation per
iod and two interesting contests were
enjoyed with Pauline Bundy and
Talmage Lewis winning prizes.
Delicious ice cream and cake was
served by the hostess.
Those present were Mr. and Mrs.
Fletcher Bundy, Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Ownley, Mr. and Mrs. Talmage
Lewis, Mrs. Roy Pierce, Mrs. Emmett
Stallings, Mrs. W. W. Lewis, Mr. and
Mrs. George Jackson, Misses Alice
FOR EASTER .
Easter Eggs ... 10c lb.
Easter Rabbits. . lc up
Easter Toys ..5c - 10c
See Our Complete Line of Easter
Wearing Apparel
Gregory's
5c, 10c and 25c Store
HERTFORD, N. C
Elmwood's Farm
Golden Guernsey
Milk Assures You
Of Purity Unmatched
Anywhere
We invite you to inspect the
most modern dairy in this section
at any time. See our sanitary
methods for making your milk
safe.
Phone us today for regular de
livery to your home.
PHONE 3401
J.
II
Oliver White
DISTRIBUTOR
Hertford, N. C.
TIME TO
HAVE
a yt
I A
K ( CLEANED
FOR SPRING!
PHONE 2311
RIDDICK'S
CLEANERS
HERTFORD, N. C
, a YOU .want to step out in style m
' the Springtime . . i in clean,
: smartly pressed suits to match the ,
season. Better send your-Spring.'
clothes to Us now for cleaning.'
then en joy, Springl ' y,
iW'X'j&''ttt rf? i' i f y,1-y
and Gracie, Ferrell, Ptuline Bundy
Ruby Lane and Addie Mae Ferrell,
and Tim. Stallings and Carl. Lewis.'.
j.f. '
XEGALNOT1CES
IT
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
Having qualified as Administrators
of the estate of A. W. Roughton, de
ceased, late of Perquimans County,
North Carolina, this is to notify all
persons Tiaving claims against , ' the
estate of said deceased ' to exhibit
them to the undersigned ai Hertford,"
N. C, on or before the 2nd day of .
April; 1942, or this notice1 will be
pleaded in bar of their recovery. All
persons Indebted to said estate wffl ;
please make immediate payment. A;
This 2nd day of April, 1941. v.
J. R. STOKES, ,
D. J. PRITCHARD, -Administrators
of A. W. Roughton.
apr.4,ll,18,15,may2,9 ,
LLCLEMi
i
TEN DAYS ago we were in the
middle of a bad Used Car Traffic Jam, as we
told you in this paper.
Now, thanks to the fine response to our
Quick Action Sale, we've moved dozens of
cars and trucks off our lot into the hands of
mighty pleased buyers.
No wonder they're pleased. Look at the
prices in this ad. Then come see the cars!
We're almost out of the jam, and it'll be a
long, long time before you'll be able to buy at
these sensational prices so hurry!
LAST DAY VALUES
SALE ENDS TOMORROW NIGHT AT 10 O'CLOCK
1940 Chevrolet Master Deluxe
Coach. Excellent condition and
ready to go
for
$675
1940 Chevrolet 2-door, black fin
ish. Low mileage. A real buy
at this
price
1940 Ford Deluxe Tudor,
water heater. Extra clean
low mileage.
Priced at
$650
Tudor. Hot
i clean with
$700
1937 Chevrolet Coach,
job and new tires.
bargain priced
at
New paint
A special
$375
1940 Ford 95 H. P. lVa ton truck.
New motor. Good tires and
Baker Trailer.
Priced
$900
1938 Ford -ton Pickup. Here's
just the 'thing you have been
looking for.
Only
$250
1935 Chevrolet 4-door Master Se
dan. This one is a real bargain.
Priced for quick
disposal
1935 Ford Deluxe Tudor,
ditioned and guaranteed.
bargain priced at
only
$225
Recon
A real
$225
n
For a real insurance' policy that gives you your money's worth,
ask about the new Universal Protect ,re Plan. Costs only $3.50 with
purchase of a new car or $2.25 with the purchase of a used car. See
us about this protective plan.
Remember, We're Taking Trades and Giving Extra Easy Terms!
Winslow - White Motor Co.
AUTHORIZED FORD DEALER
Hertford, N. C.
mm
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flnr Tom . s
Yes, hear mote da
tioiu clearly sad
powerfully, with
this new 1941
Philco ! Priced amaz
ingly low end costs
less ttffapente. No
wet batteries to pay
for and recharge . . .
no wind chargers!
See and hear the
famous 1941 Philco
Farm Radio now!
mLjlj
1 ire ""'
PHILCO 95F
New Push-Pull Audio Sys
tem and super-sensitive
Philco Speaker give you
tremendous power sad the
finest purest tone you've
ever heard! Prosnuns take
on new richness, new bril..
IJancei: Gor
geous cabinet
of craceful
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$43.55
Of SATTBY
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