North Carolina Newspapers

    -i-i- TOE PERQUIMANS WEEKLY. HEBTEORP, N. Cj ttOSAY, OCTOBER 17, 1M1
1
LOOIUuG AT WASHINGTON
xBy Hugo S. Sims, Washington Correspondent
Breaks
'U. S. News For Europe.
Nii Mnmnnnlv.
The United States is attempting to
broadcast news to the various coun
tries of Europe in order to counteract
the propaganda of the Axis news
monopoly.
: Germany's rigid control of all
news reports and the Nazis ruthless
suppression of all other sources of in
.;. formation give Hitler a decided ad
vantage in the propaganda cam
paign now raging.
The people of conquered countries
are permitted to secure information
designed to assist Hitler's purposes.
The severest penalty is inflicted upon
individuals listening to foreign broad-
fsts and every effort is made to
event the distribution of unbiased
Views in Europe.
Now, under the leadership of Col.
W?lliam J. Donovan, coordinator of
information, the United States is us
ing short-wave radio to break into the
Axis news monopoly in Europe and,
also, to counteract Germany's propa
ganda campaign in Latin America.
i Col. Donovan is in charge of the
broadcasts to Europe and Nelson
Rockefeller, coordinator of Inter
American Affairs, directs informa
tion activities in Latin America.
Both agencies operate under the
State supervision which outlines the
. policy to be followed in each major
icmntry.
M mi I i 1 1 A !!
jjine purpose oi tne Droaacasis wm
be to present facts. Little time wll
be wasted on entertainment but every
effort will be made to five listeners
in. foreign countries accurate infor
ot&tion that cannot be obtained at
Home.
Japs Marking Time. U. S. Standing
Firm.
There has been little improvement
in Japanese-American relations since
Prince Konoye sent his letter to
President Roosevelt, indicating that
Japanese statesmen understood that
a crisis would develop immediately
unless Japan called a halt to her am
bitious program in the Far East.
While the JaDanese have been rela
tively quiet for the past few weeks,
mere is every indication that Tokyo
hopes to secure concessions through
diplomatic efforts. There is little
reifeon to believe that Japan has al
tered her fundamental plans for a
"New Order" or that the United
States has been fooled by diplomatic
dtatlarations from Tokyo.
The economic sanctions against
Japan. continues in force and. un
doubtedly, the effect upon Japanese
economy is becoming serious- - The
American military mission to China
is opefjljr attempting to assist the
Chineyt in their desperate defence
again& Japanese invaders. British,
w... w"w uww 111 Will.
Far Bji jst continue to meet with regu
larity to discuss the threatening
probU jtafl of the Far East.
Neiwier the United States nor Ja
Jfin h J given ground insofar as na
tional policies are concerned. The
threatened clash is a direct result of
the hefd-on collision of these policies.
Until one nation, or the other, yields
Mssively, the peace of the Pacific
w$' b precarious, depending proba
bly uponjtoe outcome of the gigantic
struggle between Germany and Rus
sia. The United States insists upon the
policy of the "Open Door" in China
which merely asserts that all nations
shall have equal commercial rights
in regard to China. Having recog
nized the territorial integrity of
China, the United States refuses to
recognize Japan's conquests or to
confirm Japan's claim for superior
rights in the conquered areas.
The American s position involves no
special rights for this country but
undertakes to protect admitted A
merican righto in the Far East which
will become extinct if Japan gains
the dominant position that she seeks.
Peace Offer Expected. Rejection
Certain.
Repeated Rumors of an impending
peace offer from Berlin scheduled for
delivery as soon as Germany can win
a decisive victory over the Red Army
find little or no response among the
Officials of the United States and
Great Britain.
A peace offer from Germany would
attempt to organize European pro
duction and prepare for a gigantic
offensive, designed to crush Great
Britain and to secure contol of Africa.
Convinced that Hitler's European
set-up cannot permanently endure
unless the world is reorganized along
Nazi economic lines, most experts
consider permanent peace impossible
unless Great Britain and thP I;
iStates are prepared to accept Nazi
domination oi the world.
The attack upon Russia has given
Germany a worthy opponent. The
Nazi parade which beeran in Austria
has been definitely checked in Russia.
Hitler himself admits that he under
estimated the extent of Russian re
serves and, despite the conflict a
bout losses, it is apparent from Ger
man statements that the Russians
have inflicted heavy casualties upon
the German Army.
Reports from Europe indicate that
Germany is beginning to experience
a shortage of manpower and the ris
ing tide of rebellion in the occupied
countries present the Nazis with
another serious problem. If the Ger
mans can score a signal triumph
against Russia, it is obvious that a
breathing spell, such as would be af
forded by a temporary truce, would
permit the Nazis to recuperate and
reform for the next move in the
march toward world control.
Wars Won In Shops. U. S. Supplies
Decisive.
"Wars of today are won in the
shops," declares William S. Knudsen,
Director-General of the Office of
Production Management, in urging
the United States to produce "plenty
of guns and tanks and planes and
ships."
Mr. Knudsen calls attention to the
"tremendous lead" that the Nazis
have in the production of certain im
portant war items and warns that
they will continue to hold the lead
fora long time "unless we step-up
our present pace."
The emphasis upon production is
not exaggerated. Hitler's threat to
torpedo all ships of every nation car
rying supplies to Great Britain is
Germany's official admission that sup
plies from this country will turn the
tide of the battle.
The United States, through the
Lend-Lease bill enacted by Congress,
and various utterances of President
Roosevelt, has pledged the production
of material and its delivery into the
hands of the nations fighting Hitler.
This means not only the production
of guns and tanks and planes and
fJHe Aire (Prepared!
To Make Loans To You!
REMEMBER All those repairs you had
planned to make to your home? Have
you actually made any of them?
If you need funds for repairing or re
modeling come in today and discuss
your problem with us. We are making
loans for items that need your attention
now.
You will find our Association ready to
assist you. Take a few minutes to inve&-
L. tigate the Building and Loan plan of low
f pact" Intina ixnfVT ortmronionf navmonta
WATCH FOR OUR ANflOUMENT
OF THE ISSUE OF OUR
FORTY-THIRD SERIES OF STOCK
; Mrd Building & Loai Association
. ... '. Hertford, N. C , -
A. W. HEFREN, Fre-yt , W, fl. HARDCASTLE, Secretary
ships but their successful transporta
tion into the present war area 3.
Both Germany and the United
States understand the vital signifi
cance of the successful delivery of
munitions and implements of warfare.
The war policy of Germany requires
that the delivery be defeated. The
policy of the United (States insists
that the deliveries be speeded. The
conflict is inevitable.
The fact that the United States is
following international law and that
Germany is violating recognized rules
is incidental because the Nazis have
given abundant proof of their inten
tion to do anything to advance their
scheme of world mastery. Secretary
Hull rightly refers to the torpedoing
of American-owned tankers as an
act of lawlessness, piracy and at
tempted frightfulness."
The Neutrality Act, now the focus
of bitter discussion in Washington,
has failed to prevent the incidents it
was intended to avert. Vessels have
been torpedoed within the American
neutrality zone, far from combat
areas and there is the probability
that the sinkings will increase in ac
cordance with Hitler's proclaimed
policy of torpedoing every ship that
attempts to "help England."
HOME AND GARDEN CLUB
MEETS ON FRIDAY NIGHT
The Hertford Home and Garden
Club met on Friday evening at the
home of Mrs. Carlton Cannon with
Mrs. L. S. White as assistant hostess.
During the business session plans
were made for the club party, which
will be held Friday evening. The
club also decided to make 18 boys'
shirts for the Red Cross. Miss
Maness gave a very interesting talk
on the selection of furniture.
After the business session, a snnial
hour was enjoyed with the hostesses
serving a delicious sweet course.
Those present were: Miss Maness,
Mesdames E. L. Reed, Hurley Hof
fler, Wilson Reed, Seymour Chappell,
William Landing, J. S. McNider, Z.
A. Harris, Mark Hathaway, V. A.
Holden, Josiah Elliott, B. T. Wood,
Norman Elliott, Reginald Tucker, L.
S.' White, Carlton Cannon and Wil
liam Tucker, and Mrs. Hampton,
Durants Neck Woman's
Club Seeks Aid For
The Durants Neck Woman's Club,
in an effort to raise money for the
financing of the Durants Neck Com
munity Building, Is requesting resi
dents of the New Hope Township to
contribute one dollar each toward
payment for the building.
beveral persons residinr in the
PAGE TBBEB
township have already contributed to
the fund, according to Mrs. Elmer
Banks, president of the Durants Neck
Woman's Club, who requests that oth
ers who wish to give toward the fund
see any of the following people: W.
E. Dail, Mrs. W. W. Spencer, Mrs.
Ervin Turner, Mrs. Carson Stallings,
iSteve Perry, or Mrs. Elmer Banks.
i
JYOUR "tt S." SERVICE MAN SAYS:I
Vont trv tosoueeze dot fast-
thousand miles out of a worn tir&
That's dangerous economy because your family's safety is
precious and accidents arc expensire. Besides, we'll pay you
more for your unsafe worn tires than they're worth to you
wnen we put on "U. i. quality tires.
m i
JoHellevt y-v (-
UQUIO. TABLETS. SALVE.NOSt DROPS
Enjoy the iong -lasting safety
anc money-saving mileage of
U. S. ROYAL DE LUXE
1. GREATER PROTECTION AGAINST BLOW
OUTS! Every cord "safety bonded," every ply a
safety ply!
2. GREATER PROTECTION AGAINST SKIDS!
Famous "Brake-Action" tread controls skids, stops
you quicker, straighter, safer!
3. GREATER PROTECTION AGAINST WEAR!
Tempered Rubber tread, deeper non-skid design
give you more non-skid miles!
NjI tides
Joe and Bill's Service Station
"Where Service Is A Pleasure"
HERTFORD, N. C.
SINCLAIR H-C
DOUBLE-RA
GASOLINE GIVES
GE ANTI-KNOCK
HIGH SPEED PLANE
1941 MODEL
XX 7r MMIMil T- TTIT
LOW SPEED PLANE
1978 MODEL
The speedy 1941 Army fighter and the old
World War fighter represent two speed ranges
in flying. They are pictured here to remind
you that in driving a car there are also
two main speed ranges. The first range is
from 10 to 45 miles per hour, and is used
mainly in traffic. The second range is from
45 miles per hour up-
wards, and used mainly on the open road.
Sinclair H-C Gasoline is specially refined
to give you high anti-knock in both these
speed ranges. Be sure to get high anti-knock
not in just one speed range, but in two. Ask
your nearby Sinclair Dealer for Double
Range Sinclair H-C Gasoline. It sells at the
price of regular grade.
". fttSrr. ' 3-iG..-v
9
)
.1
K9 .
HERTFORD, KG
    

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