North Carolina Newspapers

    J ' io '
J
11
A"
' i
' 7 ' f ( i r.
HERTFORD, N. C, FRIDAY, THE PERQUIMANS WEEKLY, DECEMBER 12, 1941
PAGE THBE3
. . . . .'.j,. V K.
i LOOKING AT WASHINGTON
. 'xv: - By Hugo S. 8im, sWas!iington Correspondent
Ml
"557
Friction Increases Between
," Laborers
. President Roosevelt's leadership
has mainly been confined to the field
of foreign ffatfs . In the past sev
eral months he ha not taken an ac
tive lead Ixt pushing through any im
t portant legislation on domestic is-
noes. 1 He has left the enactment of
an effective price control measure
"and an anti-strike bill up to the two
'houses; :t
'Although President Roosevelt has
" given the go-ahead signal to Congress
' on anti-strike legislation there is
' ; some doubt whether he really favors
such action. He would like to have
maintained labor laws in their pres
ent status had it not been for John
I. Lewis' captive, coal rmncntoNter
It was hard enough to iron out
differences between the CIO and the
A. F. of L., but now mediation poli
cies have to deal with two CIO fac
tions. Although the majority of the
CIO workers and A. F. of L. work
ers are wilting to cooperate with the
President in his plan to stop defense
strikes through voluntary coopera
tion, John L. Lewis says, "No."
The mine workers stand behind him.
Mr. Lewis' position today is very
I
ill
Give electrical gifts and you give conveni
ence ... a priceless gift for little money, bee 3
ur complete selections of fine quality Elec
trical Gifts!
a
Steak Broiler
Perfect home gift! Broils steaks
right at the table! Chrome plated
broiler with heat indicator, plate,
racks.
Lightweight Iron
New, lighter iron to make Moth
er's work easier. Streamlined, au
tomatic heat control and indicator.
w
ELECTRIC MIXER
1 'Superb gift for the home you love best! New 12-speed mixer that
creams icings, mixes Dauers, Deais eggs, masnes potatoes, juices
fruits, whips cream.
Waffle Iron
Chromium plated waffle
they'd' love! Heat indicator, spe
dal aluminum grids, new stream
lined design.
Automatic Toaster
iron Budget priced toaster heat indi
cator for just the kind of toast
they like. Detachable cord included.
similar to his position some years
ago when he broke with the A. F. of
L. Friction between the different
factions of labor made it very diffi
cult for Government mediation to
operate effectively. The main obsta
cle to the Government's labor policy
is John L. Lewis' unsettled coal
strike.
Although Congress bellowed loudly
for a chance to enact strong anti
strike laws before President Roose
velt gave the go-ahead signal, it has
now settled, down to considering only
very mild measures. Congress real
izes that laborers cannot be forced to
work; it also realizes that best pro
duction results are to be obtained by
giving the workers freedom. Con
gress has not attempted to compel
workers not to strike, but has merely
strengthened present Government me
chanism for refereeing the bouts be
tween management and labor.
Congress Goes Slow On Price
Control Bill
In order to avert the threat of in
flation President Roosevelt asked
Congress for price control legisla
tion more than four months ago.
On the last Friday night in No
vember the House finally passed a
price control bill, 224 to 161. Senate
Minority Leader McNary has justly
called this bill "toothless and timor
ous." The bill passed by the House calls
for a Price Administrator to be ap
pointed by the President, subject to
Senate confirmation. It also creates
:i five-member board with power to
over-rule decisions made by the Price
Administrator. The creation of this
board prevents the Price Administra
tor from becoming an economic Czar.
Farm prices are protected. The
Price Administrator is not allowed to
establish a ceiling lower than the
highest of the following three levels:
(1) A price equal to 110 per cent, of
parity; (2) the market price prevail
ing October 1st, 1941; (3) the aver
age price for the period, 1919-1929.
The House bill permits the estab
lishment of a ceiling on rents in de
fense areas. Any tenant living in a
defense area may appeal to the ad
ministrator if he believes his rent to
be too high.
In order to prevent undue fluctua
tion, the House bill permits the Gov
ernment to buy and sell in the domes
tic market.
No one should be deceived that this
flimsy legislation called a price con
trol bill could succeed in stopping in
flation. To begin with the bill does
not call for over-all ceilings, but for
individual ceilings over those commo
dities which get out of line. The Ad
ministration might be able to control
inflation with only individual ceilings
if it was allowed to license all busi
ness men engaged in dealing in con
trolled commodities. Ihen, licenses
could be revoked if price ceilings
were violated.
An effective price control bill must
put some restraint on wages, because
wages are an important element in
the cost of production and prices.
The House bill failed to put any re
straint whatsoever on wages or sala
ries.
According to the opponents of the
House bill, food and other agricultu
ral necessities may continue to rise
as much as thirty per cent, above
their present level. The rise in the
price of agricultural products must
be controlled if price control legisla
tion is to be effective.
Efforts of the House to control
inflation are distressing. The pros
pects of the Senate tackling this very
important task are not at all good.
In fact, in the most reliable quarters,
it is revealed that the Senate proba
bly will not begin considering a price
control bill until, at the earliest, in
January.
Burning Cotton Stalks
Is Expensive Practice
Burning cotton stalks will cost the
average North Carolina farmer just
about $5 an acre, says Dr. E. R.
Collins, agronomist Of the Experiment
Station at N. C. State College. j
In a warning against this practice,
now commonly employed after the
crop has been harvested, Dr. Collins
pointed out that cotton stalks on an
acre of good land contain approxi
mately 27 pounds of nitrogen, 7
pounds of phosphoric acid, and 36
pounds of potash.
At present prices for these fertil
izing materials, the State College
agronomist explained., the farmer
would have to pay around five dollars
an acre.
He said the amount of plant food
removed by raking and burning the
stalks would be equal to 400 pounds
of a fertilized analyzing 6.75 percent
nitrogen, 1.75 percent phosphoric acid,
and 9 percent potash.
"What's more," Dr. Collins con
tinued, "burning destroys from 1,500
to 2,000 pounds of organic matter
badly needed by most soils. Turning
under or killing all cotton stalks be
fore frost is an important factor in
boll-weevil control, but to remove
them from the land is a serious drain
on the fertility of the soil.
"Where only the lint and seed are
removed," the State College man
went on, "a bale of cotton removes
a total of only 70 pounds of plant
food, as compared with 95 pounds for
60 bushels of corn, leaving the stalks
and fodder on the land, 100 pounds
for 30 bushels of wheat in straw,
and 115 pounds for 50 bushels of oats
in straw."
MISS BLANCHE CARTWRIGHT
HONOREE AT SHOWER
Mrs. Eddie Harrell charmingly en
tertained at a lingerie shower on Fri-1
day evening at the home of Mrs.
Henry Cartwright in honor of Miss
Blanche Cartwright, bride-elect ot
the month.
Bronze and gold chrysanthemums
were effectively used to decorate the
lower floor.
The guests were greeted by Miss
Elizabeth Layne and Miss Maxine
Harrell presented each guest with a
miniature corsage.
Games and contests were enjoyed,
with prizes being won by Mrs. Ralph
Harrell, Miss Bertyia Chappell, Miss
Elinor Eure and Miss Hazel Mathews.
The honoree opened and acknowl
edged the numerous lovely gifts.
Those present and sending gifts
were, in addition to the honoree,
Misses Maxine Harrell, Elizabeth
Layne, Hazel Mathews, Elinor Eure,
Bertha Chappell, Lucille Cartwright,
Maude Cartwright and Beatrice Ben
ton; Mesdames Ashby Jordan, Ver
non Winslow, Odell Cartwright, Leo
nard Pierce, James Pierce, Benjamin
Smith, Kermit Benton, Ralph Harrell,
William Whedbee, Floyd Mathews,
Henry Cartwright and Eddie Harrell.
The hostess served a delicious sal
ad course with soft drinks.
AUTO AND PERSONAL LOANS
See Us Personally Before Purchasing an
Automobile. No Investigation Charge.
PERSONAL LOANS FOR EVERY NEED
HERTFORD BANKING COMPANY
MEMBER FDIC
HERTFORD. N. C.
Of 089
a'iiw;ii!& am mm ma
f jjj
O The exclusive Crosley "Floating Jewel Tone System" (Pjt.
applied for) in this distinguished radio-phonograph combina
tion means added enjoyment for you when you play your favor
ite recordings whether they are brand-new or old and worn.
By virtually eliminating ail surface noise and needle scratch,
this revolutionary Crosley development brinps out with com
plete fidelity every variation of tone, plui adding an extra full
octave of low tones! Your records last I-'IVE TiMHS longer,
too. And, there's lO-tuhe performance in this 8-tuhe :! AC super
heterodyne on American and Coniplrtc-Iiand Foreign wave
lengths. For extra convenience, a slide-out panel in the .striking
w ilnut cabinet makes the automatic mwd pl.iyir instantly
accessible. Be sure to see this outstanding Crosley v.iltie today.
-"In.linlinK rtrritier ,
Hertford Hardware &
Supply Company
BOOTH CARTWRIGHT
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Cartwright an
nounce the engagement and approach
ing marriage of their daughter.
Blanche Dorothy, to the Rev. Luther
Lamberth Booth, son of the Rev. and
Mrs. J. W. Booth, of New Orleans,
Louisiana.
The 'wedding will take place the
latter part of December.
i Combination Grill Coffee Maker
ibination;jrrill present the Make delicious coffee! Chrome
le family wiU criorf- Grills, pjated heater, "? easier-to-clean,
, fries! Nickel plated, j.iaB8 8np ftize,
i .-Iined top. . ; (
:iabing Heating - Electrical Contracting
Auto - Suggestions
0
Charley the
Chain is a good,
reliable fellow.
He's a good man
to have around
in an emergency.
You'd be sur
prised at the
number of holes
hell pull you out
of and the num
ber of skids he'll
prevent But even Charley warns
against over-confidence. He
makes it clear that drivers should
exercise as much care while he's
with them as when he's at home
.to the garage. Charley says that
: according to The Travelers lat
est highway safety booket "Here
Today" there were almost 1.500
accidents in 1940 which wouldn't
hare happened if drivers r-.
j used chains when road ccn-'itiorw
slearlyindicat'i their pH
II THE FINEST ALL TIME IM
i,ff .. 5V I
01
r-4
OCVKOUT JUDS
MnONU DffWSI
T
fOITU
twm or
, amuica
TODAY-WHEN ECONOMY
IS THE WATCHWORD---
WHY PAY MORE?
(than Chevrolet's low prices)
WHY ACCEPT LESS?
(than Chevrolet's high quality)
SAVES
ENERGY
SAVES
MONEY
SAVES
5
SAVcS , ,
-V.-Vk-.-A.....A ,
IT PAYS TO BUY THE LEADER AND GET THE IEADKJG CUY
TU
Hblldweil
Chevrolet
Go
V.
v
I
HERTFORD, N. C
i tit
(A .
t
1
r t 1 , ' ' V t
' 1 v
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view