North Carolina Newspapers

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General News Items
TO SUSPEND CONSTRUCTION
The Senate committee on roads
Tuesday ordered a subcommittee to
prepare a bill dealing with the sus
pension o£ new highway construc
tion in the state for the next two
years and to ascertain if certain ex
emptions should be allowed.
MIX MUST PAY *66,000
A jury Tuesday awarded Zack T.
Miller, Oklahoma rancher and show
man $66,000 damag'e against Tom
Mix, movie cowpuncher. Miller al
leges Mix broke a contract to appear
with Miller’s 101 Ranch show and
gued or $342,000.
DROP AGENTS
Cleveland county commissioners
Tuesday notified their farm agent
and home demonstration agent that
these two offices were to be dis
continued.
PIG TURNS TABLE
A pig that Nicholas Zankl was
attempting to slaughter at his home
in Missouri struggled so vigorously
that Zankl was thrown into the pot
of boiling water intended for the
pig. Zankl died Monday.
BODY OF FARMER FOUND
M. C. Henderson, 40-year-old
farmer of the Brush Creek section
of Madison county, was found dead
early Tuesday morning on the rail
road track at Marshall and it was
believed he had been struck by a
train.
foreclosure moratorium
Other leading Eastern life insur
ance companies were reported Tues
day to have joined the New York
Life Insurance company in a decision
to suspend foreclosure activities on
mortgaged farms.
ITALY WILL TALK DEBTS
The Italian government accepted
Tuesday the offer of the United
States government for a discussion
of the war debt as soon as possible
after President-elect Roosevelt takes
office.
EX-KAISER PLEASED
Former Kaiser Wilhelm and his
son, the former crown prince, re
ceived Adolf Hitler’s appointment as
German chancellor with satisfaction,
Wilhelm believing that Hitler will
be able to maintain law and order,
it was made known Tuesday. The
question of Wilhelm’s return to
Germany remained unsettled.
RELEASED UNDER BOND
John Brigham, of Hamlet, was
released under $1,000 bond Monday
in the death of Mrs. W. R. Simp
son, who was- fatally injured when
struck by Brigham’s automobile
Sunday.
FIRST DAY ROWDY
Communists and Socialists called
for a general strike Tuesday against
the government of Adolf Hitler,
Nazi leader, while, Hitler began his
first day as chancellor by seeking
parliamentary support to guarantee
the existence of his regime.
TO WORK N. C. TIN MINES
State Geologist H. J. Bryson said
Monday the outlook is bright for the
bringing into production in Lincoln
county this year of fairly extensive
tin ore deposits.
BILL WOULD DESTROY MARKET
A prospect of a 100 per cent, in
crease in the price of ham and bacon
if the emergency domestic allotment
farm relief bill becomes a law was
presented to the Senate agriculture
committee Monday by a spokesman
for the meat packers.
ARREST AGITATORS
Six known agitators were arrested
by police at the Briggs Manufactur
ing company’s Highland Park plant
at Detroit Monday as they sought
to keep a boisterous crowd of 1,000
strikers under control.
HITLER CHANCELLOR
Adolf Hitler, fiery leader of the
German Fascists, came into political
power in Germany Monday when he
assumed the chancellorship in a new
German cabinet.
ELON STUDENT KILLED
Hall Branner, 24, a student at i
Elon College, was killed and his
companion, Miss Ether Peirson, 23,
of Cheswold, Del., was injured Sun
day night as their automobile ran
off the road near Wilmington, Del.
Motorists took the couple to a hos
pital at Dover.
JAPAN TO DEFY LEAGUE
Japan feels that she must occupy
Jehol province regardless of the at
titude of the League of Nations, a
government spokesman said Monday.
AGAINST ALLOTMENT PLAN
The textile interests, at a hearing
granted by the senate committee on
agriculture, took their stand Monday
unreservedly against the pending
domestic allotment plan of farm re
lief. It was in the nature of a na
tional non-sectional protest against
what many regard as an untried
economic experiment, suggesting
many elements of danger.
TO PROTECT NAME
An injunction against the promo
ters of Carolina Beach, located near
Kitty Hawk, demanding that they
refrain from using that name, will
be filed in Superior court at Wil
mington by commissioners of the
town of Carolina Beach.
IS 51 YEARS OLD
Surrounded by his family and in
timate political advisors, President
elect Roosevelt celebrated his 51st
birthday Monday night at an in
formal party in the family cottage
at Warm Springs, Ga.
OUR NEW STORE
WILL OPEN AS SOON AS
BUILDING IS COMPLETED
We still have a stock of Feed and Gro
ceries in our warehouse, opposite old
store location.
BRING US YOUR PRODUCE
CASH & CARRY STORES
Sparta, N. C.
TRY A BOTTLE
PEPTONA
THE AFTER FLU TONIC
COUGH SYRUPS 25c and 50c
Aspirin Tablets Cold Tablets
B. & T. Drug Co.
Sparta, N. C.
To Lead Inaugural
General John J. Pershing as
Grand-Marshal will lead the Inau
gural parade at Washington on
March 4 when President-elect Roos
evelt is inducted into office, an
nounces Admiral Cary T. Grayson,
Chairman of the Inaugural Com
mittee.
TODAY
IWVRKERl
SIOOC8R!D6E|
TODAY AND TOMORROW .
OZAKI .... facing the guns
Twenty years ago Yukio Ozaki,
Japanese statesman and diplomat,
gave to the people of the United
States the great grove of Japanese
cherry trees which blossom every
spring on the banks of the Potomac
by the Lincoln Memorial in Wash
ington.
Ozaki, now 73 years old, left Lon
don the other day to go back to his
native Japan, confident that upon
his arrival he will be assassinated
by some fanatical member of the
war party of his nation. Ozaki has
always been a man of peace. Years
ago he warned his people against
the rising war spirit among them.
It takes a brave man to stand by
his principles and to offer no resist
ance when others seek to slay him.
The spirit in which Ozaki is facing
those who would destroy by force
all that he believes in, is the spirit
which has actuated all of those who
have ever impressed their principles
permanently* upon the world.
REVOLUTIONS .... not here
I talked the other day with an in
telligent Russian, recently returning
to America after an absence of
several years, who voiced emphati
cally his belief that the United
States is on the verge of a revolu
tion.
“Had it ever occurred to you,” I
asked him, "that there never has
been a successful revolution unless
the army, or the bulk of it, was on
the side of the revolutionists? The
Bolshevik revolution in Russia be
gan with the organization of thej sol
diers in workers’ union. The French
revolution didn’t come about until
the Royal Guard joined the revolu
tionists.
My Russian friend reflected a
while and then admitted that I was
right. The founders of this Republic
realized that no government could
be stable unless its armed forces
were kept subordfhate to the civil
authorities, and they wrote that into
the Constitution. That is one rea
son why we can never have a soldier
as a Secretary of War. Our military
system does not breed revolutionists
in its ranks. We progress by evolu
tion and not by revolution.
COMMUNISM .... fading here
The last surviving communistic
societies in America have either died
out or gone over to individualism. A
fe\y days ago the head of the Shaker
Community at Mt. Lebanon, on the
New York-Massachusetts line, died
and it was disclosed that there are
only twenty-five members left of
what was once the largest group in
this country which held all their
property in common. A day or two
later it was announced that the
thousand members of the Amana
Community in Iowa, who have led
a completely communistic existence
since 1855, have “gone capitalist”,
are beginning to use money and
have employed managers from out
side to help operate their community
industries.
The Pilgrim Fathers tried to run
the Plymouth Colony on Commu
nistic lines, but had to give it up
after seven years. The soil of
America has never been a fertile one
for anything but individualism.
THEATRES . . . lower prices
One commodity that is coming
down in price is entertainment. The
other day practically all of the im
portant theatres in New York an
nounced a reduction of almost 50
percent in some cases more, in the
price of all tickets.
In London the most successful
venture in recent years was the
opening of the so-called “Shilling
Theatre” presenting good plays at a
shilling per ticket.
The fantastic salaries paid to
theatrical and motion picture per
formers are rapidly becoming a
thing of the past. Some of the thea
trical “headliners” got so exorbitant
iH their demands that New York’s
principal vaudeville theatres changed
over to a motion picture house. Af
ter a few weeks of that the actors
came around with their hats in their
hands and the theatre is reopening
for vaudeville, but it is not paying
its stars $2,000 a week any more.
UFA’S.forced sales
A neighbor of mine who is re
puted to be wealthy i engaged a
plumber to do some work in his cow
stables. When the bill was pre
sented my neighbor didn’t have the
cash with which to pay it at the
moment. The plumber slapped a
mechanic’s lien upon the property,
and the man who owed him had to
sell a couple of cows at sacrifice
prices to get the cash to pay the
plumber.
“If people would pay me for the
milk they have bought from me I
wouldn’t have any trouble paying
plumbers,” my neighbor explained
to me. I have more than $1,600
owing me for milk in this little com
munity, some of the bills two and
three years old. People don’t pay
because they think I am rich and
don’t need the money. It seems to
me there ought to be some provision
in the laws whereby the farmer can
place a lien upon the property of
people who buy his product, just as
the mechanic Can.”
I don’t know just how it would
work, but it seems to me that there
is some merit in my neighbor’s
suggestions.
Bank Robbery Loss
Is Nearly $900.00
(Continued From Page One)
trance was gained by breaking the
lock on the front door, after which
a rear door wras opened to admit
men with the necessary tools. The
door to the main vault was blown,
but the robbers failed to open the
smaller money safe inside, and their
loot included only the petty cash in
side the main vault.
In their haste, the robbers were
said to have left a gold watch.
Although police in the county and
in neighboring counties and cit(£s
kept a close lookout, chanceB of ap
prehending the robbers were con
sidered small inasmuch as they had
several hours in which to make their
getaway.
TWO ARE ARRESTED
Two 24-year-old matrons were
held in $1,000 bond each lor the
grand Jury in New York City on a
charge of stealing $300 and valuable
papers from Robert L. James, Ma
rion textile manufacturer, Monday
night in his hotel room.
Smithey Store
Coming to Sparta
THE PEOPLE OF ALLEGHANY
COUNTY WILL GET ADVANTAGE
OF MASS BUYING AND BARGAIN
DISTRIBUTION.
Look For Later
Announcement
GOODYEAR
SPEEDWAY
Great Value at Small Cost
Cash Prices—Free Mounting
30i31/2
Each in Pairs
4.75-19
*5**
Each in Pairs
5.00-20
Each in Pairs
4.40-21
Each in Pairs
4.75*20
Each in Pairs
5.25-18
[Each in Pairs
4.50-20
Each in Pairs
5.00-19
Each in Pairs
5.25-21
Each in Pairs
LOOK AT THESE
Quality
FEATURES
1 Husky, handsome, heavy, long*
wearing tread.
| Deep cut non-skid traction foe
extra grip.
I Built with Supertwist Cord —
Goodyear patent.
4 Full Oversize in all dimensions.
5 Goodyear name and houaeflag
on sidewall.
4 Guaranteed for life by world's
largest rubber company.
7 New in every way—a value
get because MILLIONS Ml
people buy Goodyear Urea.
AVOID HEAVY REPAIR BILLS BY
GIVING YOUR CAR PROPER ATTENTION!
We are prepared to properly service your car. You’ll find that proper at
tention will save you much in repairs. Drop in today and let us check
your car’s needs.
Standard Gas and Oils — Standard Batteries
Anti-Freeze — Goodyear Tires and Tubes
Alleghany Motor Sales
Sparta, North Carolina
    

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