North Carolina Newspapers

    « l l ■ ■■—i *»■ —..4.. ■ ^4. ——
TO ALLEGHANY TIMES
subscription Rates
$1.00 Per Year
Published Every Thursday
Entered u Seoond-ciaai matter at
ttia PoaV-ofEiioe In 8p*rta, N. 6.
EBWIN B. STEPHEN »r
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER «• 1#»T*
YOU OW*
You, the average citizen, ore ii
debt 13.060. Bo to your wife So ***
ttnuh of jrour children and all othei
n^Lttvaa. So la everyone else In the
country.
A part of thU debt you know a
Wut. You contracted it aa a personal
obligation. It's entirely your respon
sibility. But another—and large part
contracted for you. The chances
are that you don't even realize you
It—no one la dunning you for pay*
■bant, you aren’t eo much aa pay
ing the Interest directly.
This latter Is the public debt, which
a substantial! proprotlon of
a trtfl1 nat<ft"ni debt * in excess of
|3O0,O<M,O0O.OOO. It’s been growing at
on accelerated rate during, and since
the war. You’ve permitted it to grow.
You and your fellow citizens weren t
auttialently interested in government
to Work for policies standing for econ
omy and efficient. Or you voted for
mnssuree that increased the debt be
ouuo it was easy to do, and didn't
asma to affect you financially at all.
A Good Baadutton For 10S4
It’s a little early yet for New
Year’s resolutions, but here’s one
worth considering—’TU do my part to
reduce fire waste in 1034.”
It a hundred million Americans did
raaotv* that, and didn’t drop it along
Shout the second week of January
With the resolution eoacerlng smock
* teg, the would have a splendid
■tart toward winning a difficult and
- ancient fight. We have long been the
moot prodigal of people when it come
to fire. We’ve sacrificed thousands of
Bras and millions of dollars to It—pre
. daely as the peoples of the pre-chris
ora sacrificed their victims to the
god of flame. In those days the rea
son was superstition—in ours it Is a
combination of ignorance and laziness
And w* la aa reprehensible as the
Fires mean high tax rates. They
mean terror and misery and disister.
They mean stultification and despair.
YIm’t* ruined whole communities.
Their total economic waste can’t be
ecqpressed accurately in figures—the
direct loss comes to between four
hundred and five hundred million a
year, and the indirect waste is sev
eral times as great.
Conquering fire In 1034 would give
recovery a mighty impetus. It would
save jobs and payrolls and homes and
farms and producing industries. It
would keey money at work that
would otherwise be destroyed and
made Useless. Make that resolution!
, . ■' J
Local Newspapers Neglected
One of the most surprising and dis
appointing features of the present up
turn In business is the faet that the
local newspapers, which hav been a
tremendous faetor in maintaining the
morale of every community during
the distressing conditions of the past
few years, are receiving scant consid
eration at the hands of merchants and
business men.
We have before us the current issue
of one of the state’s outstanding week
JUm—published in a neighboring city
of more than 3,000 population. It is a
good newspaper, brilliantly edited,
enjoys a large circulation. But
this edition, which Is a fair average
bma, contained less than 200 inches
of local advertising.
Presuming that this paper sells ad
vertising at a rate of 80 cents an inch,
which is the rule In towns of similar
gfea. Its advertising income is less
than 970 a week, or approximately
0MB a month, which is insufficient to
■ever the cost of labor and white pap
er, and leaves nothing for taxes, de
predation and interest on investment
net to mention a profit for the publi
It la inconceivable that food bum
Mt men ts any community will thus
1*11 to support an institution which
H ao vitally necessary aa a local news
there are doaena of similar situa
tions tn Miaslaaippl, where splendid
•owspapers, whiah have rendered eon
^Icuoua serpice over a long period of
ymn, are being literally starved to
death by business men who could use
(Mr to tremendous advantage in cre
.m,« ft demand for merchandise and
T*e Daily Timee-Leader is not com
plfttalng. We beleive that most of the
merchant- and business men of West
point appreciate the valuv of the
*>me paper, and that it will continue
to grow and prosper. We are speaking
for the weekly press, in the smaller
lunng where good business men are
•ot only failing to use the greatest
advertising force in the world, but
mfeere strong and useful local news
papers are being literally starved to
goftth by shortsighted merchants.
newspaper advertising is today the
greatest potential force in modern
Uw1nr~ There is no other means by
pftfoh the merchants or business man
^ roach so many consumers so eco
oo—irally.
me local newspaper
is an invited
gpeot It is read thoroughly by every
ot the family, this cannot be
af ether foams ot advertising,
which probally accounts for the fact
that 76 per cent of all national ad
▼ertla^ng last year appeared in the
newspapers.
The economy of local newspaper
advertising is illustrated by the fact
that a half page advertisement in the
Daily Times-Leader costs less than it
would require to send a postal card tc
each of our subscribers. The same
thing can probably be said for the av
erage Mississippi weekly.
Mind you, the newspapers of the
country are asking no favors. They
only seek that which is their due
President James Madison was right
vhen he said: "To the press alone,
jheckered as it is with abuses, the
.vorld is indebted for all of the tri
umphs which have been gained by
reason and humanity over error and
oppression."
West Poiat (Miss.) Daily Times
Leader.
CHILDREN WITHOUT SCHOOLS
100.000 additional children are de
prived of educational opportunity
this fall because of the closing of
schools due to lack of funds.
1.669.000 children 6 to 13 years
old are not in school lnnormal years
521,700 children 14-15 years old
are without schooling in uormal
years.
That means a total pf 2,280,000
American children of school age,
who, according to most compulsory
education laws, should be in school,
but are notl
Nearly 2,000 rural schools in 24
States failed to open this fall. So
far no city public schools are report
ed dosed. Many private and paro
chial schools are closing. Twenty
four Catholic schools have closed, af
fecting nearly 3,000 children. Six
teen institutions of higher education
have been discontinued since last
year. Estimates indicate that 1,500
commercial schools and colleges
have closed.
In some communities free public
schools have of necessity become
tuition schools, acquitting only those
children whose parents can pay the
rate asked. For example, in one town
of 15,000 population grade school
tuition $5.50 per month. In this
town at least 200 children whose
parents could not pay the tution
charges were being denied an edu
cation.
With Pick And Shovel.
The Wisconsin State Journal.
The click of the pick and the click
of the shovel are reassuring not only
to the men being given work but to
the entire public. They indicate that
a definite employment program has
been started which may eventually
solve the problems of labor for the
10,000,000 in this country estimated
to be still out of employment,
The remuneration the workeds re
ceive will stimulate buying. This will
give private industries a chance to
put on more employes. The civil
works program has far more behind
it than the actual employment that
is furnished. It is a beginning that
appeals to every one upon a program
which may finally solve the unemploy
ment program.
Click of the pick and click of the
shovel are Chrism as bells to many at
this time.
HUNTER
By Kldwtn Carlile Litsey
Death in his heart and death in his
gun
The hunter goes where wild things
run
Hie image of God is out today,
His heart aflame with the lust to
slay.
But only the devil will guide his
aim
And the course of the lead which
will kill or maim
And it will be murder in field or
bush.
When the hare leaps out, or the
coveys flush.
Driven by hunger a man may slay,
But what shall we think when he
kills for play ?
Turn back.O Hunter, and let them
be
The harmless ereatures of grass
and tree.
Helen Keller’s Tribute to the Dog
This remarkable woman, deaf,
dumb, and blind known the world
over, reproduces in her book, “In
Scotland,” a letter she wrote to the
Duke of Montrose:
“Dogs are wonderful, I have a darl
ing Scottie, named ‘Ben-sith,’ which
they tell me is Gaelic for mountain
fairy. She is not as black as she
should be, and she has funny ‘bow
legs,’ but her eyes are black diamonds
and her heart is pure gold. God was
very good to us when he made dogs;
they are the only beasties that truly
love us. They share our moods, they
make every pleasure sweeter, and
when we are sad, they wipe away our
tears with silken ears. They ask no
questions, they make no criticism,
they are happy loving us.”
Be the first m your community tc
Join the Red Cross this year.
Read the Advertisements. Thej
carry a message from the merchants
to you.
RED CROSS RELIEF
AIDS DISTRESSED
IN 120 DISASTERS
Help Given in Fires, Floods, Earth
quake and Epidemics Part
of Year’s Task
The American Red Cross has reached
into the homes of six million families
in the past year with unemployment
and disaster relief, Chairman John Bar
to Payne announced.
“As the year closed the organization
continued in readiness to serve in the
forthcoming winter at the point of
greatest need and to adjust its service
to meet the calls of the emergency of
unemployment and disaster/’ Chairman
Payne stated.
In a year of greatest economic dis
tress in the nation’s history, in which
the Red Cross ably discharged a relief
task in distributing flour and clothing
to distressed families in all but six of
the nation’s 3,098 counties, the organi
zation also was called into action in 120
disasters, of which 96 were within the
borders of the United States.
Earthquake, floods, hurricanes, fires
and other cataclysms visited death and
destruction upon the lives and homes
of thousands of people. Red Cross sta
tistics showed that in the 120 disasters
almost a thousand lives were lost, 148,
840 homes were destroyed or damaged,
13,275 persons were injured, and Tied
Cross relief was given to 452,879 indi
viduals.
In giving aid in these disasters, in its
unemployment relief and in handling
the distribution of government wheat
and cotton, the Red Cross expended
from its national treasury the sum of
11,070,284.
During one period of twelve weeks,
46 disasters occurred in 23 states. Red
Cross disaster workers were hard
pressed in meeting all of these needs
occurring at once, but everywhere mis
ery was promptly relieved.
Support of the Red Cross work is
through its annual roll call, conducted
by chapters in the period from Armis
tice Day to Thanksgiving Day, Novem
ber 11 to November 30. Every citizen
who Joins the Red Cross as a member
aids in carrying relief to disaster vic
tims and in other Red Cross services,
such as preservation of life, child wel
fare through the Junior Red Cross, and
direct service for the public health.
RED CROSS CLOTHES
THE NATION'S NEEDY
Flour, Bread, Clothing Reach Into
More Than Five Million
Homes of Jobless
The greatest task ever undertaken
by a relief agency in the history of
private charity is drawing to a close
with the final distribution of cotton
clothing to more than five million
families by the American Red Cross.
At the direction of the Congress, be
ginning eighteen months ago, the Red
Cross undertook to convert the wheat
and cotton surpluses of the Farm
Board into food and clothing for the
unemployed and needy. In the con
sequent operation, this relief agency
entered upon a commercial enterprise
greater than any single commercial
firm has ever undertaken in the same
period of time.
In the ensuing months the Red
Cross converted 85,000,000 bushels of
wheat into flour and bread and gave it
to 6,803,000 families. The distribution
was through 3,700 Red Cross chapters
and hundreds of other charitable agen
cies. During the severe northwestern
drought of 1931 the Red Cross also
gave wheat in the form of food for live
stock to 184,188 families.
The clothing — dresses, underwear,
overalls, jumpers, sweaters and stock
ings for men, women and children, and
even blankets and comforters—was dis
tributed to 6,465,410 families. More
than 64,000,000 ready-made garments
and 92,000,000 yards of cotton cloth
were given to the needy. This clothing
came from 844,000 bales of cotton.
The wheat distribution was conclud
ed in June, 1933, and final distribution
of cotton clothing is occurring in the
fall months.
In handling these tasks voted to it
by Congress, the Red Cross will ex
pend from its own treasury $735,000.
At the same time the organization car
ried on its regular program of disaster
relief; of service to the veterans of all
our wars; of educational and welfare
work through the Junior Red Cross;
of health education and public health
nursing and of life saving and first aid.
Funds for this work come from the
membership roll call the Red Cross
chapters conduct from Armistice Day
to Thanksgiving Day, when every one
is invited to join the Red Cross and aid
In thl* vital relief work.
Seven hundred thousand women vol
unteers under the Red Cross banner
sewed for the needy last year and
many thousands still are making cot
ton garments for their Red Cross
chapters.
The Red Cross has 3,701 chapters
and 10,000 branches of chapters. Thus
It can be mobilized nationwide in a
great relief task within 24 hours.
Uncle Sam is asking that all Christ
mas packages be mailed early to a
void congestion of the mails.
*****
Give the Times to a friend for
Christmas. It will go into his home 52
times for one dollar.
*****
Merchants will sonn be displaying
holiday goods and reminding you to
shop early.
* * * * *
ADMINISTRATOR’S NOTICE
Having qualified as administrates
of the estate of G. C. Warden, de
ceased, notice is hereby given to al
parsons holding claims against thi
estate to present them to the under
signed within twelve months fron
this date or this notice will be pleat
in bar of recovery. All persons in
debted to the estate are notified t»
make immediate settlement.
This Nov. 6th, 1933.
HOMER A SMITH.
NOTICE!
NORTH CAROLINA,
ALLEGHANY COUNTY.
In The Superior Court—Before the
Clerk.
B. D. Beamer, executor of J. H. Rhu
dy, deceased, Plaintiff,
vs
Mrs. Hattie Rhudy, Jame3 Rhud;
Mary F. Sutherland, Horace Sutk
erland, Ralph M. Rhudy, Elis Os
borne and T. H. Osborne, efendant?
The defenedants above named, will
take notice that action entitled at
above has been commenced in the
Superior Court of Surry County
North arolina, to sell land owned bj
defendants for partition and to create
assets to pay the debts of the J. H
Rhudy estate; and the defendants will
further take notice that they are re
quired to appear at the office of the
Clerk of the Superior Court of said
ounty on 14th day of December, 1933
and answer or demur to the complaint
in said action, or the Plaintiff wii:
apply to the Court for the relief de
manded in said Complaint.
This 13th day of November, 1933.
A. F. REEVES,
Clerk of Superior Court
NOTICE OF SALE!
Under and by virtue of an execu
tion issued out of the Superior Court
of Alleghany County in favor of the
Bank of Sparta as plaintiff and B.O.
and Leff Choate as defendants, I will
>n Monday, Dec. 4th, 1933, at on
V clock P. M., at the court house a
Sparta, N. C., to satisfy said ex(
2ution, sell to the highest bidder fc
;ash, the following real estate, tc
wit:
FIRST TRACT: Beginning on
stake on Main Street of Sparta, N.C
running north 52% E. ICO feet to :
3take; S. 42 y2 W. 25 feet 10 inche.
to a wall; then N. 42% W. with wall
20 fet 2% inches to a stake; S. 51%
E. through B. O. Choate’s residence
74 feet 2 inches to a stake; N. 42%
W. 41 feet 3 inches to the beginning,
being the lot of land duly allotted to
B. O. Choate as his homestead, the
allotment being recorded in the office
of the Register of Deeds in Book 6,
Page 338.
SECOND TRACT: Beginning on a
stake on Main Street of Sparta, run
ning from the center of the walk
leading to P L. Choate’s residence, S
42% E. 52 feet down the street to a
stake; N. 51% east 235 feet to a
fence in B. O. Choate’s line; N. 41 %
W. 52 feet to a stake in P. L.Choate’o
fence; S. 51% W. about 235 feet to
the beginning, being the land allotted
to P. L. Choate as his homestead, the
allottment being recorded in the of
fice of the Register of Deeds of said
county in Book 6, Page 336.
This Oct. 16th, 1933.
R. B. McMILLAN, Sheriff
NOTICE
Having qualified as executor of the
last will and testament of Ellen Mill
er, I hereby notify all persons having
claims against her estate to present
them to me within twelve months of
this date or this notice will be plead
in bar of recovery. All persons indebt
ed to the estate are notified to make
settlement.
This Nov. 6th, 1933.
M. E. REEVES,
Executor of Ellen Miller.
NOTICE OF EXECUTION SALE
NORTH CAROLINA
ALLEGHANY COUNTY
In. The Superior Court—Before the
Clerk
J. Cam Fields, plaintiff,
-vs
J. Mack Osborne, defendant.
Under and by virtue of an execu
tion in attachment dirtcted to the
undersigned by the Superior Court of
Alleghany County in the above-en
titled action, I will, on Monday, Jan.
1st. 1934 at one O’Clock P. M. at the
court house door at Sparta, sell to the
highest bidder for cash to satisfy said
execution, all the right, title, and in
terest of the defendant J. Mack Os
borne in the following described real
estate, to-wit:
Being a one seventh undivided in
terest in what is known as the Jennie
Reeves place, lying and being in said
county, Prathers Creek Township, ad
i joining the lands of Eugene Transou,
E. L. Williams and others, containing
about 156 acres, and fully described
by metes and bounds in a deed from
D. C. Duncan, Administrator of W.
G. Reeves dated Dec. 1st, 1930 and re
corded in the office of the Register of
Deeds of said county in Book 40 Page
570 and 571.
This the 23rd. day of Nov. 1933.
R. B. McMillan, Sheriff,
By Walter M. Irwin, D. S.
The days of barter have not been
relegated to the past. Yesterday we
heard a man say to a local merchant,
“Gimme three rabbits’ worth o' gun
shells."
# * * * *
NOTICE OF SALE OF LAND FOR
PARTITION!
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
ALLEGHANY COUNTY.
By virtue of a decree of the Super
ior Court of Alleghany County in a
special proceeding entitled “Maggie
Bell McMillan vs Page McMilland and
others, I will offer for sale at public i
luction at the court house door at ,
Sparta on Saturday, December 23rd, I
1933, at 12 o’clock noon, a certain i
tract of land situate near New Hope I
-hurch in said county and known as j
‘the Sue McMillan land,” adjonling
the lands of Wiley M. Irwin, R. A. !
Doughton and others, and containing
about 24 acres.
Terms of sale: One third cash and
balance on a credit of nine months,
purchaser to give bond with security
for deferred payment.
This November 21, 1933.
R. A. DOUGHTON, Commissioner !
NOTICE!
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF ALLEGHANY,
In The Superior Court—Before the
Clerk;
Z. L. Osborne, Plaintiff,
vs
Jane Parsons, Ellen South, Sara Hol
come, Nannie Surrat, Zack South,
Tom South, Clemmie Ward, Wick
Parsons, Del Parsons, and others,
heirs at law of Pebe Johnston, Nan
cy South, Mary Parsons and Hiley
Osborne, defendants.
The non-resident of the defendants
above named will take notice that an
action entitled as above has been
commenced in the Superior Court of
Alleghany County, being an action for
sale for partition all the lands of
which F. M. Osborne died, seized and
possessed in said county. The defen
dants will further take notice that
they are required to appear at the
office of the Clerk of Superior Court
of Alleghany County on or before
thirty days from this date and answer
or demur to the petition filed here or
the relief demanded will be granted.
This November 21, 1933.
A. F. REEVES,
Clerk of the Superior Court.
NOTICE
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
BEFORE THE CLERK
NORTH CAROLINA,
ALLEGHANY COUNTY
Helen Osborne and husband, Charlie
Osborne, Plaintiffs
-vs
Ellen Burchett, et al., defendants.
Under and by virtue of judgement
in the above entitled action, I will
offer for sale at public auction at the
Court House door in Sparta, on the
4th of December, 1933, at 11 A. M.
to the highest bidder the following
described lands:
Being the lands of which Jacob
| Pruitt died, siezed and possessed, con
[ taining fifty-five acres more or less,
.bounded and surrounded by the lands
iof Booker Taylor, Fielder Mabe, Bed
| ney Pruitt, and R. L. Doughton. Said
j sale will be made for one-half cash
,on day of sale, and balance on twelve
months time.
This November 7, 1933.
R. F. Crouse,
Commissioner.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT. ~
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF ALLEGHANY
Under and by virtue of a certain
execution issued out of the Superior
Court of Alleghany County in favor
of Mrs. Lura Hackler, Administratrix,
and against W'. H. Edwards, D. M.
Edwards and C. W. Higgins as de
fendants for the sum of $99.85 to
gether with interest and costs, in
order to satisfy the same, I will, on
Monday, Dec. 4th, 1933, at one
o’clock P. M., at the court house door '■
at Sparta, N. C., sell to the highest
bidder for cash, all the right, title, !
and interest of W. H. Edwards in and
to the following described real estate, j
to-wit:
All that piece or parcel of land
containing 62 acres more or les, lo
cated, lying, and being in Whitehead
township, said county and State, !
being bounded on the north by the !
lands of John R. Joines, on the east |
by the lands of Robert .Rector and
Clark Joines, on the south by the I
lands of J. M. Brown and Alvin Ed
wards, and on the west by the lands
of S. M. Edwards and Wm. Clary.
This Nov. 1st, 1933.
R. B. McMILLAN, Sheriff, i
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT
NORTH CAROLINA,
ALLEGHANY COUNTY.
Sidney Gambill, Administrator of the
estate of J. W. Roup, deceased, ;
vs
Mrs. Nannie Roup et al.
An upset bid having been made on
the 3ale of the lands hereinafter des
cribed, which sale was made on the
30th day of October, 1933, I will, on
Saturday, December 2nd, 1933, at the
court house door at Sparta, N. C., at
one o’clock P. M., sell to the highest
bidder the following described land
to-wit:
Lying and being in Alleghany coun
ty, said State, Prathers Creek Town
ship, surrounded by the lands of
Frank Roup, Floyd Roup, S. M. Cau
dill, Charlie Patterson, and others,
being the old home place of the late
J. W. Roup, containing 60 acres more
or less.
Terms: One-half cash on day of
sale. Balance on six months time.
This Novfember 1st, 1933.
SIDNEY GAMBILL, Commisioner.
TO YOU
Our
Subscribers
and
Advertisers
ON THIS APPROPRIATE OCCASION
THANKSGIVING
DAY
WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY OF THANKING YOU
FOR ENCOURAGEMENT DURING THE PAST SIX
MONTHS. WE APPRECIATE THE INTEREST YOU HAVE
SHOWN IN YOUR HOME PAPER, AND WE PLEDGE
YOU OUR BEST EFFORTS IN THE FUTURE TO MAKE
THE TIMES A PAPER THAT TRULY REFLECTS THE
j LIFE AND INTERESTS OF OUR CITIZENSHIP.
SINCERELY,
The ALLEGHANY TIMES
Your Home Paper
I
SPECI ALS'CCHRISTMAS
Just rec' .ved a new shipment of living room suiteaii
specially priced for CHRISTMAS. These are genuine^
values, selling elsewhere for $70.00 & up. Our Prices:
TAPESTRY SUITE.$47.5oj
GENUINE VELOURS ..... ..$58,501
**********
Give yourself a new floor covering for Christmas.!
Genuine Armstrong Linoleums in bright new patterns.]
Special Price: (size 9x12).. .$5.55 to$6.50j
Dress up your living room with a new wool felt rug.
Varied patterns (size 9x12).$13.50
Kitchen cabinets and Washington ranges bought on
the low market and the savings passed on to you.
$8.50 values in cotton mattresses at $5.00 to $6.50
A full line of iron beds, mattresses, chairs, etc.I
AH other furniture and goods specially priced fori
CHRISTMAS and the NEW YEAR. P S
BOYS, if you want good shotguns at less than present
wholesale prices, see me at once. Only a few left.
.^ee me save money on your home furnishings.!
SPARTA FURNITURE COMPANY -
A. L. Rector, Manager ***** Sparta, North Carolina
THE SPARTA GARAGE
IS YOUR CAR READY FOR COLD WEATHER ?
A general motor tune-up will insure easy starting and
peppy performance on frosty mornings.
—GILLETTE AND ATLAS TIKES_
GENERAL REPAIRS POPULAR PRICES
F. M. JOINES, Manager.
SPARTA, NORTH CAROLINA
TRUSTEE’S SAIJE
NORTH CAROLINA,
ALLEGHANY COUNTY.
By virtue of the power conferred in
the undersigned, A. B. Steadham,
Trustee, in a certain Deed of Trust
executed by T. G. Richardson and
wife, Annice Richardson, Jan. 13,
1930, recorded in Book 16, Page 90,
in office of Register of Deeds, said
County and State, securing the pay
ment of a note in the amount of
$600.00 with interest, default having
been made and demand for sale be
ing made by the holder of said note,
I will, on Friday, Dec. 1st, 1933, at
1 o'clock P. M., at the court house
door in Sparta, Alleghany County, N.
C., offer for sale to the highest bid
der for cash the following described
real estate:
In Gap Civil Township, adjoining1
the lands of Bess Spicer, W. B. Estep,
Hay Hampton and others, being the
tract of land conveyed to T G Rich
ardson by R. a. Wagoner and wife
by deed dated Oct. 10, 1929, and re
gistered in Book 39, page 143 in Al
leghany County, to which record re
ference is made for a full and speci
c descnphon; containing 67 and 56
100 acres, more or less.
This October 31, 1933.
A. B, STEADHAM, Trustee.
A third allotment of pork from ^
Federal Government has been
ed in the State, and Alleghany will
?et her share within a few daL
*****
See Castevens Motor Co., for radio
catteries, tubes, and service.—adv.
    

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