North Carolina Newspapers

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VOL. 24 NO. 52
State And N
Condensed It
?National News?
WaiCsim-glcn, Deo. |7.?Advpoltos
of stronger national defense express
ed confidence today that Congress
would fall quickly, into Htoe with executive
proposals tor vastly expand"'
dng America's military strength.
They said specifically they ex
peoted President Roosevelt to ask
tor an air fleet of at least 13.000
craft?about four times as large as
at present.
Washington. Decj. 27.?Secretary
of Commerce Hopkins, it was learm
ed tx>day Is considering a nation
wtain drive to put millions of unelployed
men and women back to
wcrk in private Industry,
t in i r i i rir iT-T'Wrfw-' ""Vr i y'-- rv-1
. . the Government's vast, work relict
program has discussed the possibilities
of such a campaign with busness
leaders here and in New York
Richmond, Va.. Deo 27.-?The dc
uuded lands of the Midwest's dust
bowl are showing signs of outoinutic
recovery.
This report- was made to. 'he Amertaan
Association for the Ativancement
of Science today by Dr. J. K
\yeaver of the University of Nebraska.
in spots that have had' two years
pf good rainfall, he said, there are
the beginnings of a "carpet" oyer
the Soil. This is made of blue grass
mat pi ante and other low growing
forms. Where there has been only
sue fear of rainfall, there are nevertheless
signs of recovery in a
few spear* of the carpet here and
there.
Camden, N. J., Dec. 27.?An attrac
tive 26 year old brunette was reported
in m critical condition in a |
hospital .today from ten bullet
wounds Detective Clarence Arthur
said were infltoted by a man wtooee
? - ? a BVIA ' hod Mltmto/)
ytnxmv ouc uuu wutuv-u
unopeded several hours earlier.
The yomm woman Florence Ootlwald,
waa shot last night, the detec
tlvsa said as she topped from a
friend's automobile In front of ber
home. Arthur said he took Into custody
a man. he booked as Emll Mascher,
46 year old. WPA worker.
San . Francisco, Dec 27.?Police
searched today for a two year old
Patricia Brady who was taken from
her home Christmas by some newfound
acquaintances.
Mr. and Mrs. James Brady told
poltoe a oouple they had met recently
made a Christmas call and
asked permission to take blue-eyed,
curly haired Patricia to buy her a
present. Brady la a WPA worker.
.Lawrence, N. V., Dec. 27.?James
Loucheftm, 94, who as a youthful reporter
for the "Cincinnati Press"
covered the assasslnlatloa of President
Lincoln, is dead here.
Washington, Dec. 27.?The set-up
-of the new congress and its committees
betokens a session filled with
! compromises. At many turns toward
< expansion and bolstering of bis program,
President Roosevelt will run
into a committee chairman or other
-eweta. OS Gotten H om ft.
lUIIUWlim VOU?M7 Vi wvww
crmt whose views do not exactly af
gree with, hi* own.
Paris, Dec. 27.?Dispatches from
north Africa today reported that
Italy was massing troops on the
frontiers of French/ Somjpliland.
'-I- .i ii -i - - -
Laughing Aroui
. 1 with irvit
One of Those P<
br irvin
TUDGB HAL CORBETT, formerly
J attorney in New York, is one c
he has a friend, also a former Kentv
eo cordial of manner.
One bright morning Corbett i
bumped into hie grouchy acquaint*
"Good day!" he cried. "Where i
"None of your blankety-blank I
if you weren't a good friend of mine
Upon another oeeaaien the aai
several others upon the steps of
hour came, and the whistle on a ne
"Twelve o'clock," he remarked,
home to dinner. If dinner ain't re
; ,itis run4j. 1.aint argoto'doontai
-
XT M :
Kings
ational News
l Rvinf Pnirm
A A* A IV1 A VI 111
| ?State .News?
Wadesboro. Dec. 27.?Marcus M
Roberta, 37 was found dead with his
head lying In Goulds Fork Creek about
a mrile west of Wadesboro Sonday
afternoon.
Roberta, whose health had been
bad for some time, was taken to
,ae creak, where he had some mink
traps eet, early Sunday morning by
a relative. After the body was found
Wn inquest was ordered by Coroner
W. B. Moore to follow an autopsi
by Dr. Wallim and Dr. Clem Hamm
of the Anson County Health I>epari- ]
inent. Findings indicated that Hoi>-1
erts probably died of a stroke or
heurt attack.
.Y'x* I irnww
Iwira *\f I hr? /' V! /Vint hi.?? 11?. -.1 f
?. W v? ?"< x_y n> \ uuturu Itiiiiui yi
Greenville. in-Jurcd Saturday after
noon In an auto accident near here
were nut lug fairly well todjy at the
Mary Black well Hospital
____________
Burlington, Dec. 27.?\V. D Riddle,
58 was burned to death early yesterday
when fire destroyed a roadside
service station -which he operated.
He had his sleeping quarters In the
building.
*' ? W
Stateeville Dec. 27.?Augustus D..
Troutman. 93, outstanding Iredell
County citizen, veteran of the Army
of the Confederacy, died Sunday at j
his home In Troutman. '
]
Winston-Salem, Dec. 27.?Robert ^
Johnson, 68. a bachelor, was found
burned In d??th in bis shack near
here yesterday. .. 1 /
Coroner W. ft. Dalton said the ag- '
ed man apx>arently had suffered v
heart attack fallen In to the ' open
fire nd' ciuwled out upon the heart^.
Raleigh. ' Dec. 27.?Gov. Hoeyfs
message to the 1939 Legislature |i
expectedi to recommend, among o(lV
er things, a balanced budget, creation
of 'i State Department of JubtToe.
election law refonns. snd tir^
addition of a 12th grade to the pult-*
lie school system.
Qastonla. Dec. 27.?Jam'1? Leroy
Thomas, 30, of Stanley died yesterday
morning -in Garrison Generel
Hospital of injuries received Friday
night when the car In which he was
riding struck a telephone pole in
W'ABt f!n?tr?nln Hp nnff<?roH n cnn. -
cuusslon of the brain and other In
juries.
Two other Stanley men who were
with him. Ceell Land', 28, and Lov
Carson Stone 22 also were taken to
the hospital and they returned to
their homes. '
Whiston-Salem, Dec. 27.?John W.
Hanes. Undersecretary of the Trees
ury, asserted here today the new
income tax forms for smaller corporations
will save money for at
least 490,000 of the 6430,000 corporations
making returns.
r
?J
Gaston la, Dec. 27.?Robert Horjon ]
34, an employee of the Tuckaseege
MUl at Mt. Holly died In at Charlotte
hospital last Friday. The' illness j
which resulted in his death was be {
lieved to have had Its Inception in i
an attack of rabbit fever.
I I
<
Rockingham, Dec. 27.?Dr. A. C. (
Everett, a practising physician in 1
Richmond county for nearly 40
years, died yesterday following a
heart attack. He was 65 years old. '
j. ,
id the World . !
!
4 S. COBB
1
erfect Grouches ]
S. COBB
of Paducah but now a practicing
if the most affable men alive. But
ickian who, on occasion is not quite
ML I
' yA i
T r
gas hia way to his office and
ace. \ 1 j
are you bound for ao early?"
rasiness," answered the other. "And
11 wouldn't tell yoa that mucht"
ne misanthrope was standing with
the county court-house. The noon
arby ptanlng-mill Bounded.
"Well, I guess I'd better be going
ady I'm going to raise hell, and ?
laran bite?'
lawn taa.)
HHIIHIHHIHHHHHk
Moun
-? " H
KINQ8 MOUNTAIN, N. C.
! THE POC1
i of KNOW!
i -
UMPlMt WOSE
OWC/ATfO \
**/*? s/rrwa on \ "?
4 ciMtt /N mack \ . /V*??
a* ?CA*f p?.Arm ? \ V f
th? maw | r*m tmjr uurrao snrcs
uavt comaa/siho mtur vtsstn co.tr
our Bit+asn r*o Boon ami
Bouotrr Xho onrto our rot
this sum at rut BtOtNMNO
Of rut trvOLurrouAjrv wab ?
BAKER AND KEETER
DECORATION WINNERS
\
Williams and King* Mountain Drug
Take Second Prizes.
< _
Keeter'w Department Store was
iwarded first prize In th^ Christ- j
nas decoration contest sponsored
>y the Men's Club with tbe Kings
fountain Drug Co. taking second
>rlze. Tlte prizes were awarded pure
y on decorative display, and not for
tny Idea expressed.
Dr. arid Mrs. D. P. Baker were I- i
varded first prize for residence dec- f
>ratlons with Mr. and Mrs. Chariapf ,
iVIIKams taking second place^^Tnd
takers depleted the manger aoeoe.
vith the wise men kneeling by the
rianger and a shepherd1 boy with his
heap nearby. The scene on the Wlliam's
lawn was of Bethlehem with
he wise men entering guided by the
itar in, the east. There was also a
ihepherd attending his flock in the
>ackground.
The prizes were ten dollars each
or the first two prize -winners, and
ive dollars each for the two second
irize winners. This is,the second
Tor thai nn'o Plnli *iou otuor/1.
?d the prizes. The judges .were from
>ut of town. .
Mr. Arnold Klser. president of the
Men's Club, expressed disappointnent
that there were no more enries
in the contest than there was.
ie said that he hoped, more persons
would partlclpa<te next year, as the
>bject of the contest was to mhke
Kings Mountain a more beautiful
own on Christmas.
TO ATTEND
NATIONAL MEET
Miss Sara Collins, daughter of the
ate Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Collins, and
president of the student body at
Vsheville Teachers' College, will
epresent the college at a convention
>f the National Student Federation
>f America to be held at Perdue Uul
rersity, Lefayette. Indiana.
The theme of the conference is
'Student Leadership in Cbmrnuntty
Liife," and Miss Collins nas been asilgned
the topic 'Teachers'- College*
Among the prominent speakers to
ippear on the program will be Dr.
Prank P. Graham, president of the
University of North Carolina.
Mies Collins is a graduate of Kings
Mountain High School.
Midnight Service Held At
Presbyterian Church
Young people from the Methodists
Fiaptlsta., Lutheran and two Presbyerlan
churches assembled at the
First Presbyterian church at 9:00
j'olock on Christmas Eve. From
there the young people went through"
)Ut the dty singing carols wherever
Invited.
The groups returned to the church
it 11:85 P. M. for a midnight service
beginnring at 11:30. A service entitled
"The Feast of Candtos and Carols
Just at nridntght the organ chimes
rang out proclaiming to all that
k wag Indeed Christmas Morn.
COTTON GINNING REPORT
Census report shows that 33.319
bales of cotton were ginned In Cleve
land County N. C., from the crop of
1938, prior to Dec. 13, 1938, ns com
pared with 57?4R bales for-the.-.crop
of 1337.
ttain h
r , . r.
THURSDAY, D |C. 29, 1938
CETBOOKI
LEDGERf*
aT^-?
|S|j|P ' ;
_. - . i
. _ T?f PtcKUtf I
\ A SVWIA ALWAYS / <
/
mmakamt. / 1
16,972.000 SAVItMt MPOfiTORS IN
ssC^sswr
w i/m than bo veA*s.
CHIEF BURNS SAYS
CHRISTMAS QUIET
I . ?*
In a statement to the Herald last
light, Chief of Police Burns said ]
hat Christmas was very quiet this |
ear, with only the usual number of <
trunks being taken in, and very title
disturbance from those eelebraing
(with fireworks. Tuesday after- 1
t oon, Chief Burns was called to in 1
estigate a disturbance near the '
lora village, where, some excited,1
erson said, a bloody fight was' In
irogress. Upon investigation, how- <
ever. It (prove to be only a fight be- 1
tween two men who were slightly in- 1
toxtvated, and only a couple blows 1
were struck.
The citizens of Kings Mountain. 1
as a whole, co-operated nicely with
officials, andi very few firecrackers i
were shot in the business section.
This Is gratifying when It is consld- 1
ered that shopping was very heavy i
Saturday. <
SAYS RECKLESS DRIVERS
ARE GROWN-UP CHILDREN
Amarlllo, ^Texas, Dec. 27.?Best (
way to undrape a person's personall ,
ty. manners and habits Is to place
him behind a steering wheel says
J. I,. Duflot. psychology teacher at '
West Texas State College.
"The {man who drives recklessly
?darting in and out of traffic, hoot
tag his horn hysterically and hogging
the highway with blinding light |
?to a grown-up child having a tern
per trantrum," says the professor. (
'An automobile just brings his ac
cumulative stock of h&blto to the
surface."
(
Will Rogers'
Humorous Story
. . By WILL ROGERS
yHE .son of a Texas newspaper
publisher came home from college
recently ahd in the first couple
of days ah home showed his father
plenty of what you could fail to
learn at school. He must have been
One of those college boys who burn
plenty of midnight oil; but the kind
that is used in automobiles and not
in lamps.
The boy's biggest fault was hi i
habit of exaggeration, and- the
father tried to correct this by putting
him to work as a reporter on
his newspaper. The first assignment
the young bucko got was a
labor disturbance on the outskirts
of the town. It was quite a riot,
and when they began to Are guns,
our young hero sort of lost interest
and headed for town to write his
report. His store told of the thousands
of people who were fleeing the
scene of the panic, and the old man
pounced on this as a typical example
of the boy's exaggerations.
"How," said the father, "could
these thousands of people nave run
away from the factory when the
whole population of our town is
only twelve hundred ?"
"Twelve hundred T", the lad says
without shams, "why, dad, I passed
more then that the first two minuter."
i A -n-rl?ui NiailWma. Ian)
V-y ; V . . vd?\ * I
[erald
" -' ^ :' > vv>./' * ,
; t *?T^'r^
? 7~* . ' . .n
31m -? ?
Fellowship Group
Presents Play
Tlhe Fellowship Croup of the First I
Presbyterian Church presented as a ^
worship se.rvlc". < } otuvnet play.
"Why the Chimes Rang," by Kllza- j
beth Apthorpe MeFndden ou Friday
December 23 at S-oV-lock.
."Why the Chimes Rang." is the!
most popular of Christmas plays I
in'd has been played throughout the *
world. . t
The play was adopted from the1 "
story by A. M. Allen and originated, t
In the Workshop of Radcliff college. | 1
, Luther Cansler had charge of the I
lighting. The church choir heard the .1
tynins heard during the program
rttd Charles Thomasson gave the In-, ?
'reduction for the play.
__ ,
Two Accidents
Here; One Fatal jl
Kor Two Persons
Cecil 0 Knight. ilfi ?*+?:".rl >tt.- tuvl!.
keeper. and Mixs Virginia t'lemen'.
Spartanburg teacher. were killed 1
tear here ' earlf Saturday -tfternoo i'
\ hen_ the a lit<> In which they were
iding skidded into s? passenger bus.
Fhe accident occurred in if (lie enraqce
to the Battleground . on the
drover road. ' Knight, who was em-'
ployed by the Horton Motor l.inea.i
was killed instantly. Miss Clement j
was breathing when rescuers arrived,
it, the scene ofr the wreck, byt died j
Itefore reaching a Gastonia hospital, j
. ?T. H. Smith, local piollce officer.
Said the car was headed south and
skidded while passing another auto
and was struck In the side by the
north-bound bus.. ,
The auto, which was brought to
King's garage, here, was almost com
pletely demolished. The bus was
haanaged slightly.
fThe report here was that Knight
and Miss Clement, who were reluming
from a Christmas party In
Charlotte, were planning to be mar.
ried during the holidays.
Another wreck occurred near tha
entrance to the Margrace Mill Sunflay
afternoon, when an auto driven
by Pete Lefkowitz collided with another
auto. Liefjowitz. a Greensboro
pawn shop operator, was on
bte way to Florida with his wife
when the accident occurred. Attendants
at City Hospital hi Gastonia.
where the couple was taken. said
lhat T ofbrvmlin onWoroJ ? #eont
l iiuij uci ivvn iia oum i vu la 11 ext.. l ill ni .
skull, but was not hi any Immediate
danger unless complications set hi.
His wife was suffering from shock, |
hut her injuries were not considered '
serious.
The accident in which Knight and ;
Miss Clement were killed Was the!
second such to happen In or near
Kings Mountain within the past 18
months. The first tragedy occurred (i
at the Cleveland Avenue and King '
Street Intersection In Ma? 1937.
when a young bride and groom
were killed..
Congress Due To
0. K. Defense
Washington, Doc. 27.?Advocates
of stronger national defense express
ed confidence today tfhait congress
would fall quickly into lhie with executive
proposals for vastly expanding
America's military strength.
They said specifically they expect
ed President Roosevelt to ask for
an air fleet of at least 13.000 craft?
about four times ae large as at present..
Bulwarking such requests from
the White House was said to be
'startling;" evidence that Germany m i
ready strong in the air. had equip ,
ped Its industries to turn out air
craft at an unprecedented rate.
Mr. Roosevelt's message to Congress
on Jan 4 will discuss threats
to world- peace. Informed persons
said, with particular reference to
to tthe uneasy situation nlreadv ol>
tainlng in Europe airfong countries
outside the dictatorships. (
Specific requests are to follow, (
probably in a special message. (
This message will embrace the ap
prattled need for "more equipment ]
and manpower In, the air, and on the j
land and sea, as well as a compre- ,
henalve arrangement under which ,
peacetime Industries could be quick
ly put to work on mlittary orders.
It has been eetlnVad that, despite
progress in this field since the
World War, 1 t -would take some 8
months to complete the shift.
LIONS CLUB MEETS TONIGHT
The Lions Club will meet this
evening at the Mountain View Hotel
at 7 o'clock. A number of business
men have been invited to attend the
supper and meeting by the Lions.
Otis M. Mull, Representative to
tbe State Legislature will be the
main speaker. Attorney Ector Harvft!
~*>d R. W. Foster are In charge
of the program.
Mffinfojr'ii if n"'- *- i !
... v ..... ' 1
READ
THE
HERALD ' 'ft
FIVE CENTS PER COPY
Parade Of
Local Events
Of 1938
Although several events of tmHtrlancc
occurred lit the year Just
'tiding. there were very ax compar d
with 1937. The columns of the
Herald" for the past year show
hat the following events were the
lighllghts:
Januar> 6: Hotne of Mrs Kato
'tills cotuph'tely destroyed by fire.
January 6: Mr t'arl Davidson giv
n Silver Heaver Boy Stout Award.
January 21: Aurora lU/realls
Northern Lights! seen here
February 3: Extended Mail Pe- ,
lver> Service started.
March 3: Sidney Hlacknier. M?ve
actor, and Snzantia Kaaren visit
C.r.g* Mountain. M
!uOcd^hT"nn^*?'
April 14: f <; .White named to " 'a
ill ufit-.x'ji!red tdriti' of late J. 1*. Ma't ]
ie\ on School Board
April 24' Kings Mountain School
laud wins first, plate in drilling at
Mate Meet In Greensboro.
May 19: Junior Woman's Club se- ?
sue Piny ground.
June 2; 48 Seniors graduate from
\lngs Mountain High Sthool. The |
>igge?t graduation class in the hist- J
>ry of t.he School.'.' /?
June 9: Lions Club organized 1n i
tings Mountain. Howard Jatkson eected
first president. .1
June 23: Ctuncli Passes overhead
ridge project.
uuiie neraia Move? into own
vome for first time in history of
>aper. Council Approves Sidewalk
iroject.
July 7: Kings Mountain to get
173,000 Post Office. (
July 21: Cyrus Palls sets record
>y attending Sunday School 25 years
vithout absence.
September 8: Tax Rate .raised to
11.87.
September 22: Firemen Return
vith new Flrt Truolt.
September 15: Kings Mountain
lets New Uniforms valued at $1,700
October 15: Carpenter lot, corner
dounutaln Street and Piedmont Avmue,
selected for Poet Office site.
October 20: Construction of Over*
lead Bridge started.
November 3: Arnold Riser electid
President of Men's Club.
November lO; Stroll vote gives
Democrats Big Majority. *
November 17: Improvements in
Postal Service. Parcel Post Delivery
lervlce started for first time.
December 1: Sinta Claus arrives.
Dffleial opening of Christmas season
December 8. $340 fur coat robbery
it Keeter's Department Store.
December 16: New Gymnasium
Dedicated. ' "'U
Horace C. Ross Passes
Horace C. Ross, ago 42, who was ,s
or a long time a resident of this
lection, died Friday night at homo
it Crowders Mountain following a
ong period of illness for the past
W ? AX- A - -? *
?ioc iiivuvua ixw IIAB uvea veuy mcK.
He served oversees 4a the World
,Var and was a member of the Gaeon
Post No. 23. He wai a Christian
;entleman, an upright highly respeeed
citizen. Kimerral services were
lei<* at the Second Baptist Church
>n Sunday afternoon with Rev. B. .
2. Parker in charge, assisted' by
Rev. J. F. Moss, pastor of Mountain
flew Baptist dhurch. Interment was a
nade in Mountain Rest cemetery.
He is survived by his widow. Mrs. j
Ida Elizabeth Ross and the following
five children, the oldest of whom
s under 12 years of age; Horace, Jr. :
Paul , Raymond, Arnold, Rbnnte Sua
and Elsie Ijee. His lr.Other, Mrs. f
J K. Rennet!, and a sister, Mrs.
lames Duncan, survive.
ECONOMIC
HIGHLIGHTS
The decline in industrial activity j!
hiring the nine months following An
?u8t, 1937, was the sharpest on rec- 1
?rd for any comparable period, reports
the United States News. The ,
recovery movement that set In six (
months ago, according to the same ..
source, has no precedent in rapidity a
of Improvement, with the exception |
of the brief pre-NRA boom.
These oompartsons are based upon
the Federal Reserve Bpard'a index <
nt Industrial nrodivctlon. which la a I
generally accepted barometer of Id- J
dual rial HlMn or health. This la- |
d?x mm the 1923-25 average aa a |
"normal," with a rating of 109. In > 1
August. 1937, the reading wan 117? ^
almost an high, an In 1929. In tlin tub J
aequmt May, it had dropped to tha :
abyamal low of 79?a drop of ortr
30 per cent in leas than a year.
Since May, 1939, the Index ban rla
en 24 point?, which la clone to hattj
as much aa It gained, on the avers pa
In the four preoedtng years. Wn 1>I^|
hare regained something aura than
(Cont'd on Editorial page) I
M
. ..fl
    

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