North Carolina Newspapers

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City Limits 8.465
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Kings Mountoin*s Reliable Newspoper
VOL 83 No. 33
Esfsblished 1889
Kings Mountain, N. C., Thursday, August 17, 1972
Eighty-Third Year
PRICE TEN CENTS
Summer Ends Next Thursday As School Bells Ring
Three Break-Ins, Robberies, Manhunt
Keep Police Busy; Cash, Jewels Taken
GRADUATE — Benny Dwoin
Yarbrough has received his de
gree in pschology from Gardner
Webt coilega.
Yarbiough
Wins Degree
'Bonny Dwain Yarbrough, 'on
of Mr. and Mrs. Bon Yarbrough
of Kings Mountain, was gradu
ated Saturday from Gardner-
collogo at Boiling Springs.
Yarbrough received his Bache-
1% lor of Science degree In psychol-
Kings Mountain man is
SiidoytHi Icy Kings Mountain
Brick. He expects to return to
St hool in about a year to resume
work tovvaixl a master’s degree.
McGill Heads
Gaston McGills
Norman F. McGill, Jr., partner
in MdGills Esso Service Station,
was elected president of McGill’s
<if Gastonia at the annual reunion
of the Clan Sunday at Bethel
Church Anor.
'Mr. MdGill succeeds T. A. Lynn
of Gastonia.
Re-elected secretary t rcasurer
was Mrs. Martin Harmon.
'Miss Willie McGill gave a his
tory of the Clan and President
Lynn read the scripture. Tim
Gladden said the invocation.
ipjcsidont Lynn announml that
the Clan is publishing a 3()-page
history book which will be off
the presses in the next few days.
Orders for the booklet s-liould
be directed to Herald Editor Mar
tin Harmon.
Outlaw At-Large
Is 25-Year-OId
Prison Escapee
Elford Guy Coker, 25-year-oId
escapee from a Gaffney, S. C., pri
son, who was the center of a
manhunt in Kings Mountain Sun
day, was Tuesday declared an
outlaw by Superior Court Judge
B. T. Falls.
According to tlie Attorney Gen
eral’s office, Coker i^ only the
third person to be declarld an
j)Utlaw in North Carolina.
This means that any person,
either a citizen or law enforce
ment official, can shoot and kill
Coker if he refuse.s arrest.
Coker, who had been serving a
12-year sentence for armed rob
bery, is wanted by Kings Moun
tain authorities on charges of
raping his five-year-old niece on
August 3.
Sunday’s search by local and
Cherokee County, S. C., law en
forcement officers began when
Kingj Mountain police officer
Tommy King stopped a car on
Margrace Road.
King said he spotted Coker in
the back seat. When the car
stopped, Coker ran and King gave
chase. Ring tripped aui^' suffered
a broken ankle.
Coker is described as a white
male, approximately five feet,
eight inches . tall and weighing
pounds; He has daHt, curly
hair and a dark complexion.
'Kings Mountain Police Chief
Tom McDevitt said late Wednes
day that Coker’s father was try
ing to locate him and urge him
to turn himself in to authorities.
McDevitt speculated that if he
turns himself in, it will bt with
in the next 24 hours.
Coker reporedly has been liv
ing in a wooded area behind his
home since escaiping from the
Gaffney prison three weeks ago.
Police said they have Tound a
large piece of plastic in the
woods, used as a shelter, and emp
ty food cans where he is believed
to have camped.
According to the police, rela
tives had been taking him some
of his meals up until the time
the alleged rape occured.
Police said that two ^nephews
and the 7ivo-year-old niece took
Coker his meal on that day. The
two nephews reportedly returned
home to get hatchet for the fugi
tive and loft the girl alone with
him. When the boys returned
tru-j found that the girl had been
raped, police said.
Coker was spotted in the area
Saturday night and prison author-
Continued On Page Eight
laycee Benefit
To Rescue Squad
^£*he Kings Mountain Jaycees
fly Kive away a liKJ2 Chevrolet
^“Btlun wagon on the final night
of the Bethware F'air, Sept. IG.
A drawing will bo hold at 10
p.m. and Steve Wilson, chairman
winner does not have to be pre-
of the car committee, said the
sent.
Tickets for the drawing may
'be obtained for one dollar dona
tion, which will go to the Kings
Mountain Uoscuo S<juad. Ti(‘kcts
may ho OJtaintHl at Myers Print
ing, Belt Detective Agency. Har
ris F'uncral Home and the Kings
Mountain R<?scuo S<iuad building.
Rape Charge
Is Lodged
A 32-year-old TCings Mountain
man has been charged with the
August 11 raf)e of Mrs. Ruth Eu
banks of 402 Hill Street.
PoHce arrested Winifred Hope,
who is aVicused of entering the
Eubanks home around 3:45 a.m.
August IT and sexually assault
ing Mrs. Eubanks,
According to police reports,
Mrs. Eubanks and her husband,
Grady Eubanks, were both asleep
wlien Hope alledgedly entered
the home.
Grayson's First Firm To Relocate
In Downtown; In New Home Today
Groj^oii'a Jewelry, a Kings day).
J Mountain business citizen since
1917, bwame the first business
to relocatt' in the downtown pro-
! ject Tu(*sday.
\ The ji‘welry store has 0(vupied
handsome now, air-conditioned
quarters in the building formerly
j occupied by First-Citizens Bank &
f Trust Company at 133 West
) Mountain street,
f Tile firm’s homo ha,'? bi'cn in
I the W. K. Mauney building which
is yet to be purchased by the
■Kings Mountain Redevelopment
J Commission.
j Mrs. T. Woofi Grayson, owner of
(* firm, said the firm will open
^Bits new lucation today (Thurs-
The interior and e^^rtbf of
the completely renovated build
ing is yellow and large picture
display windows open over the
city’s new min paik. Enhancing
the front of the building is a
■planter of flowers.
ilnside the building arc 'ample
display sections and one new
feature is a music section which
Tommy Grayson says will include
country and western and go^>el
ta'pes and records, in addition to
the regular stock. music fix
tures are also an ad’ditibn.
Other mcmibers of the ^aff
are Mi.'ss Peggy Rass,,. manager,
and Mrs. Ralph Harrison.
TAPPED — Dr. Bob E. Patter
son, son of Mr. and Mrs. De
witt Potterson of Kings Moun
tain. has been tapped as one
of the ''Outstanding Educators
of Americo” for 1972.
Di. Patteison
InWho'sWho
iDr. Bob E. Patterson has been
elected one of the “Outstanding
Educators of America” for 1972.
H-is name will be included in
the 1972 awards volume publish
ed to repognize the achievements
of the nation’s most distinguished
college and university teachers
and scholar. Only a select
numlber of men and women are
included in the awards volume
every year — individuals whose
contributions to profession and
cxnnmunity have merited special
recognition. Guidelines Include an
educator’s talents in the class
room, contributions to research,
administrative abilities, civic ser
vices and professional rec*ogni-
tion.
Dr. Patterson, an associate pro
fessor at Baj^Tor University in
Waco, Texas, was also electcKl
the “Outstanding F'aculty Mem-
iber Ifor 197172” by the stud<mt
'body at Baylor. He is son of Mr
and Mrs. Dewitt Patterson of
Kings Mountain.
Dr. Patterson is editor of the
twelve volume series, “Makci’s
of the Modern Theological
■Mind.” The first three volumes
of the series have alicady been
published and the others are in
the process of pifolication. He is
the author of the seventh vol
ume in the series. In 1971, he
published “The Stirring Giant”
a 312 page 'book on church re
newal.
IDr. Patterson is a B. A. gradu
ate from Baylor University. He
also holds three giaduate de-
fgrees and has done post gradu
ate work in philosophy at the
University of Texas,
1500 Exp^ted
By Craftspun
Grocer, Motel,
Rippy Jewelry
Were Targets
A rash of break-ins, two arm
ed robbe/ic.s in the area, and a
manliunt lor an outlaw and al
leged rapist kept area law en-
fojvemeiit officers busy during
the ueekoTid.
Polire said Saturda> morning's
armed n>bbcfy oi K'jyal Villa
Motor Inn at 1-85 netted thieves
over $2(X) in eajh and travelers
cheeks and Sunday morning’s
break-in of Rippy’s Jewelry fill
ed ihiev’cs purses with 16 waUTi-
cs and 13 rings.
Tuesday morning a Grover road
service station c^crotor was b<‘at-
en and robbed of approximately
$200.
iWednesday the .search had wid
ened for a 25-year-aId prison
escapee, Elford Coker, former res
ident of the Margrace area, wTio
was officialy declared an outlaw,
the state's third.
Cleveland County Sheriff’s dep
uties are still investigating tiie
Tuesday morning beutinj: and
rebbery of a Route 2, grocery store
and service station operator.
Henry Wiiitc, 79-year-old owner
of the Military Park Service Sta
tion on Highway 29 near Grover,
told Dot. Paul Barbee that two
blaiok men beat him and nibbed
him of $200 shortly after 8:30
a.m., as he was straightening up
some drink bottles in the tback
of the store.
White told Barbee the two
men hit 'him over the head with
some kind of object. He said he
tried to get uj) and they knocked
him down again and ttK>k his
wallet. He said the men tlien
went to the cash 'register and
tried to oi)en it but it was kK’ked.
WTiitc said he tried again to
got up but'the men aga^in knock
ed him to the floor and beat him.
Ho said the men started to leave
the store and when lie tried to
get up again they turned and
fired a shot at him. Wliite said
tile pistol appeared to be a .22
Continued On Page Eight
Mis. C. F. Stowe's
Rites Conducted
iF'unerai rites for -Mrs. Martha
Catherine Stowe, S9, widow of
Charles F. Stowe who died in
TB-IO, were conducicxi Monday,
morning at 11 o’clock from Kings
Mountain Baptist chuivli of
which slie was a member.
Her pastor, Rev. James Wild
er, officiated at the final rites
and interment was in .Mountain
Rest cemetery.
Active pallbearers were W. T.
Weir, Odell Benton. J. C. Bridges,
Eugene Rotjcrts, Jake Hord and
Marion Di.xon.
Mrs. Stowe died Saturday aft
ernoon at 5:30 p. m. in the
Kings Mountain hospital 'follow
ing declining health for several
years.
She was a native of Gaston
county, the daughter of the late
iMr. and Mrs. William Wriglit.
A crowd of between 1300-11500 j She formerly ovviumI and operat-
Oraftsjpun Yarn emplo-yees and led Sl(m'o’s Cash Grocery.
CITY EMPLOYEE HONORED FOR LONG SERVICE—Glenn Carroll, left, holding plaque, is congrat
ulated on “17 years service with the City of Kings Mounain” by Mayor John H. Moss, pre
senting the certificate along with a gift from Carroll’s co-workers in the Public Works Department.
Mr. Carroll retired August 11th on his 65th birthday. Pictured in the group around Carroll and the
Mayor, from left'to right, J, C. Bell. Andrew Smith Bynum Cook, Ace Mace, Dale Watson, James
Boheler, Ronnie Carpenter, Jerry Hollifitld, S. A, "Rod ' Blanton. Mr. Moss, Donnie Mace, Jack Wil
liams, and Public Works' Supt. Roscoe Woolen. (Photo by Jim Belt)
Mayor To Tap
15-Man Group
On Celebration
A 15-man Centennial /omnii.'i-
siuui to plan tijc i’ommiuiit}
ei'lebration of King^s Mount-iin’^s
lObth birthday in 1971 will be
Icrmuiatcd.
The city c-jmmlsslMi ha.? au
thorized Mayor John i • ap
point 15 citiz(‘ns to a cemniUsion
for tile purpise of directing the
Centennial cclofTna^ion and its
attend a n t ccrcm on i es.
"We anticipate this will be
the city’s biggest <vl<‘bratioM in
many years”, said tlic mayor.
Mrs.
Rites
Pattersons
Conducted
Mosters Infant
Seiiously Ill
The inlani aaiighler of Mr.
and .Mrs. Bennett Ma.sters re-
maim d in .serious condition yes
terday in Clevelind Memorial
hcs(f)ital at Shelby.
Tlie baby was born Tue.?da\
morning at 8 a.m., with a lung
ailment. ' ^
Mr. Masters is a Harris Funeral
Home employee.
their families will gather for the
company’s annual picnic Satur
day.
Lunch will bo spread from 12
until 2 p-m. at Shelter No. 2 at
Lake Crawford at South Carolina
State Park.
A i^pokesman for the firm said
that activities for employet's and
their famdlios will get underway
at 11 a.m. and continue until 4
p.m. He said horseshoe pitching,
badminton games, swimming,
and putt-putt goM are on tlie
agenda for the day.
arc
Football Tickets
Go On Sale Here
Season foootbell tickets
now on sale at the Kings Moun
tain bigih school.
Scihool Secretary .Sandra Bum-
gairdner said tickets, good for
five home games, are $7 each.
First game of the season for
the Moufitarneers is Septem-ber 1
with Bessemer City as the visit
ing team.
School Workshop
Was "Success"
The first subj>titute teacher
worksliop cmductcd by the City
Scluwl.s Admini.stralion Wednes
day was a succtss,
Supt. Don Jones .‘iaid that 37
.substitute teachers lojk part in
the two-hour worksliop. Joni\<
said the second te.i(Tier workohop
would be held in November or
December.
Any persons interested in par
ticipating in the workshoi) should
c'X>ntact the ik'hool .\dministra-
tion Office. Substitute teacher pay
is $15 per day.
Suiwiving are two daughters,
Ml'S. Margaret Spivey of Kings
Mountain and Mrs. Herman Y'awn
of Rock Hill, S. C; and two
sons, CliaiTos y. Sknvc of Kings j
Mountam and John Stowe of |
SheFcy. Also surviving are 11 |
grandchildren and 17 great-grand-i
children. ’
KIWANIS PROGRAM
Gene White, director of the
Kings Mountain K('<ipvelo|>mont
Commission, was guest speaker
at Thursday’s meeting of tlie
Kiwanis club at 6:45 p.m. at
the W’oman’s club.
Fishermen Find Missing Man's
Clothing On City Lake Rank
iFishermen found clothing re
portedly belonging to Charles
Foster, 35, White male, of Gas
tonia. and a suicide note Tues
day afternoon on the bank.s of
the city’s York road reservoir.
Rescue workers draggl'd th('
lake for several hours but found
no b(Hiy, Politv Ciiief Tiun .Mc
Devitt reportt'd.
The Gaston County man has
been missing from home since
Saturday.
In the pocket of a man’s pair
of trousers was a note instruct
ing the 'finder that Charles Fos
ter’s 1961 white Chrysler had
'boon di^pased of and "new I’m
disposing of myself. There’s no
one to lielp me with my prol>
lems.” Also on ilie hank with the
trousers were a sliirt, shorts, an<t
.shoes.
Relatives of Mr. Foster said the
car has been locattMi in Gastonia
hut so far no tracH' of the missing
man has been found.
She Was First
Woman Member
Of School Board
Funeral rites for Mrs. F'airy
Long Patterson. S(3, widow of
Arihur Hunter Patterson, were
cy.'miucted Sunday alT(*rnoon at
3 p.in. from Central Methodist
chuivh of which &he was a char- i
ter menilM?!*.
Mrs. Patterson died Friday
night at 10:30 p.m. in the Kings
ountain liospilai following illness
of several y(?ars.
F'irst w<.)man member of tlie
Kings Mountain Hoard o-f FMu-
cation, Mrs. Patlci^on was al.u)
a former Kings Mountain Herald
society editor and ndired assis
tant secretry-trcasurer of Ih»me
Savings c'i: Loan Association of
whicii her hu.^banci wa.s founder.
Mr. Pattei'son <lied May 2n(i this
year.
A native of Kings Mount.lin,
Mrs. Patterson was tin' daughter
of the late Perry and Melissa
Lackey Long.
An honorary life meml>cr of
tlie Womtm's Soriely of Christ
Continued On Page Eight
25th Year
For Harris Firm
Harris Funeral Some' Tuesday
obscre.t its 2.‘)th anniversary in
King.s Mountain.
Founded in 1917 hy Ollie Har
ris. Harris Funeral Honu* pics-
cntly has seven ctnphwci's, in-
;Tuding Ollit* Harris. Bennett
Ma.stcrs, Mr.:. B. F;i!l.s. .M ■
.\nn Randh'. lvichar<l M<‘Kcc. C
D. Ware and .John While.
Mr. Harris .said in the 2o years
Harris Funeral Home has bum
Ih'I'c. it ha"- served more than
2,dtX) families in the Grover-Kings
.M nnilain area.
"We liavc als) maintaitit'd for
^25 .v('ars on cffieicnl ambulamv
st'rvi.t*, witli trained atleinlants
wlv' know t!u' im{M>:tanec of care
ami first aid in aiiNwering these
alls, and wi‘ Iiojn' to eontinuc
till: scivice in the fa.’c of a
growin;’ trcn.l of government -
maintained ambulance service.”
Harris
Harris also noltvl the improve
ments in tin* Home over the 25
y(*ar jieri'Ml, noting (’.specially the
modt’rn Chapid.
"Kings Mountain - Gr.wer area
cili/(‘ns liave complinK'nted us
on our ser\ic(‘ througli a (piarl(‘r
centurv and our jdi'dgc is to c'on-
linin' to provide the high type
; of .service in the future,” Harris
i ^ald.
SPEAKER — L. G. Alexander,
president oi Wix Corporation of
Gastonia, will be guest speak
er at next Thursday's (August
24th meeting of the Rotary
club a 12:15 at the Country
club,
Leon Alexander
Rotary Speaker
Le n I. Alexander, Gaston
County in.iustrialist and presi
dent of Wix Corporation, will ad-
drc'-s Kings Mountain Rotarians
at their .\ugu.st 24th meeting
(next Thursdayt at 12:15 at the
C'aintry club.
Mr. Alcx:jn<u r will sfx'ak on
program arranged by Thomas L.
Irotr.
Hi' is a native of Cliarlottc
Continued On Page Eight
District Pupils
Return To Books
B:3C August 24
Where has summer gone?
'That's a question being asked
by several school-age ohildren in
the Kings Mountain area.
Summer will c(»me to an end
for th<' students next week as the
1972-73 scho^d year begins.
Thursday's first day of school
vvill 1)0 fur re.,dr,tr;ition and or
ientation. AH s.^hoo’s in the city
district will begin at 8:30 a.m.
Elementniy- schoo’s v'ill dismiss
at 10:.30, Kings Mountain High
at n:.30 and Central Junior High
at 11: 15.
The first full day of school
wall b(‘ on FTiday, Aug. 25 with
classes running from 8:30 a.ri.
until 3 p.m. Superintendent Ron
Jones s.iid that all first graders
w((uli he dismissed at 12 noon
through September 1.
The s-chool year for teachers
wilj begin on Monday. Meetings,
lectures and evaluation of in
structional programs are on tap
for Monday through Wednesday.
The sih(^u!e for Monday con
sists mostly of staff meetings
with the principals and teachers
reviewing inventories and meet
ing with c*o teachers.
No general meetings are sched
uled for Tuesday. Teachers will
spend the day pi*eparing their
Learning Activity Packages,
planning and developing centers
of interejjt and reviewing opera
tion and care of media equip
ment. principals will hold com
mittee and department staff
meetings and orient new sta':!f
m(*mbers.
Supt. Jones will preside over
a gi’iieral staff meeting fi»m
U);30-ll:30 a.m. Weiinesday in
the Kings Mountain High Schend
afeteria. Dudley BlofKl and Gene
Causi )y of Raleigh will speak on
"Human Relations” from 12 noon
until 1:30 p.m. after teachers have
lunch as guests of the Board of
Education.
Board Projects
Dog Warden
A dog ordinance and an envi
ronmental council were the
main li»i)ics of discussion during
the regular agenda at the city
board moi'ting Monday night.
The cv)minisisoners authorized
•Mayor John .Moss to appoint a
committi'e. to be chairmaned by
commissioner Jonas Bridges, to
detail a workable dog ordinance
i.\>\cring Cleveland County.
Mayor Moss told the board
that the county has only one
dog warden. Ho said, "we have
been talking to the county com
missioners as to some kind olf
tvntralizi'd plan, but have been
unal)le to move this project for
ward.”
Moss said that the county
commissioners "have discussed
'inued Page Eight
Police Department
Has Two Vacancies
FV'Iice Chief Tom IMcDcvitt is
accepting applications for two
vacancies on the police depart
ment.
Applicants, male, should be be
tween the ages of 21-30, and
weigh 160 pounds and stand five
feet eight inches tall. A high
school diploma or otiuivalent is
riHjuired and the man should be
a resident of tlie city of Kings
Mountain or be willing to move
into the city. He should have no
criminal ri*oord.
Black Citizens Air Complaints
On Davidson Park, Street Work
Black reddent.s representing
the Kings .Mountain Improvemoni
A.ss:>cjation (jue.Mioned Mayoi
Jolin M().s.s and city commission
ers on city .-jcrvi'ces at Monday
niglils regular meeting of the
Lcminisavm.
Ke\. \V. F. .^cotl, pastor of By
num's (Tia[?el .\-MK Zion church
and a rcsid»*Mt of Harmon Fourt.
"Tve gone to Davidson Park
and went swimming and got so
sick I couldn’t drive homo,” he
commented. He said there were
no outdoor toilets there, that the
baskethall goals are in a leaning
position and tliat tlTT^re supixvs-
ed to ht' a picnic area there. 'T’d
like to know what’s hapjx'ned to
the money and the grant. Was it
City public hou.vsing (tevcloj)niont. i u.sed for something eloC?, ’ he
\sas spikesman for the gnnip. He i aj4<('d. The grant he referred to
told tiu' bard and commission
ers tliat a "portion of Kings
-Mountain is being overlooked.”
"I don't know if you ever look
at tlic black s<'ction of Kings
Mountain,” he said, "but it’s in
iKid .shai>c.”
Rev. Scott cited Davidson Park
as an cxamj)le of tlic "ihty’s
lack of impi'.wemcnls in the
'olack sections.”
was a fderal grant for the city’s
park system.
Rev. St»tt said he h is tried in
the past to obtain an aiuswer
from the city in regard to his
qiu’stions hut has bt'cn given a
"runaroumi. Phey lion’t want
us to come up lu’rt’ bi'causo they
are afraid it will g('l in the pai>-
ers and make the city look bad,’*
(Continued on Page Light)
    

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