North Carolina Newspapers

    eR ——
September 18, 2003
BY ANDIE L. BRYMER
Staff Writer
When 3-year-old DeShaile Thompson's
grandmother ’s sugar level dropped to a
dangerous level, the little girl turned into a
hero.
Nell Roseboro was watching DeShaile at
her apartment when she walked into the
KMDS students’ penny drive
raises $9,000 for United Way
ANDIE BRYMER / HERALD
DeShaile Thompson and Head Start teacher Ms. Chadwick enjoy the sandbox.
Three-year-old credited for
helping ailing grandmother
daughter could bring the large jug of juice
from the refrigerator into her bedroom.
Fortunately, DeShaile proved her wrong and
did just that.
After drinking some juice, Roseboro’s
sugar level climbed and she was alright.
DeShaile, a student at East Elementary
Headstart, has her own simpler version of
BY ANDIE L. BRYMER
Staff Writer
Pennies add up to dollars
and in the case of Kings
Mountain District Schools’
$9,000 to be precise.
Students from across the dis-
trict raised the money as
part of the United Way
penny drive.
“We're so proud of them,”
said United Way finance
officer Leslie Cobb. “They
will touch thousands of lives
across Cleveland County.”
Bethware Elementary
raised the most - $2,064.
Students there presented a
check to Cobb on Tuesday.
Students Malik Mathis
and Emily Wilson's contri-
butions came from piggy
banks. Paisley Williams said
her money came from her
and her parents. Zack Keen
said his contribution came
out of “Mama's purse.”
School children in
Cleveland County and
Shelby City schools are cur-
rently raising funds. Two
student representatives from
every contributing school
will sit on an advisory
board. This board will hear
requests in January for sup-
port from agencies which
serve young people.
Recipients must have
non-profit status and serve
youth but do not have to be
United Way agencies to be
eligible for this money.
Mountain High School,
bedroom. Soon, the elderly woman felt faint
and was forced to lie down on the bed. Her
what happened.
sugar had dropped from its regular reading says.
in the 80s to 40.
Roseboro was afraid DeShaile would not
be able to help her. She doubted her grand-
DeShaile was honored by her classmates,
teacher and administrators. Her proud
mother is Tilese Roseboro.
“She was sick. I got her some juice,” she
At Bethware, each student
contributed an average of
$4.08. Raising $1,400, West
Elementary students donat-
ed the most per student,
$4.78; Kings Mountain
ANDIE
From 4A
He told the tale to his aunt who
proudly informed him that Young was
‘his forefather. When-Bill first told us
that, I seriously doubted him. After all,
he and Judy are from Indiana. They
only moved to Little Switzerland post-
retirement. After Bill gave me a few
more details, I realized this wasn't just
a tale.
Seems Bill's father is from east
Tennessee. The area isn’t known for an
abundance of jobs so he moved the
family off to Indiana in hopes of finan-
cial security. The plan worked, at least
for Bill who helped design the global
positioning system.
Bill likes to compare the system to
the monarch butterflies which visit
Altapass to lay eggs on the milkweed
growing abundantly there. He's fasci-
nated by the way the yellow and black
creatures are able to find their way
from here to Mexico. It must have been
the same force which pulled Bill and
his family to Altapass Orchard. Today
they are farming the same land their
forefather marched through. Gives me
cold chills.
Bill's cousin Jo Carson has now writ-
ten a play, aptly titled “What Sweet.
Lips Can Do.” Kings Mountain folks
might be interested in this performance
which gives the battle story from the
perspective of where it all began. The
season's final performance is Sept. 26.
HEFFNER
From 4A
Broder.
Every time those brilliant military
strategists spout off in print and on the
tube, other less-known geniuses jump
on the bandwagon.
Over in the world class city last
week, one of the local radio mouths
told his audience that Bush looked like
a deer caught in the headlights while
he was making his speech. It should be
noted that this particular mental giant
is a liberal democrat, and is not noted
for his love of George Bush. He was,
however, a faithful follower of Bill
Clinton, that paragon of excellence.
What it all boils down to is that the
president has a large contingent of peo-
ple who absolutely despise him, much
like those who always hated Nixon.
They don’t like Bush because he beat
their man in a close election, and he
actually lost the popular vote.
He was not the first president to win
the election without the majority of
popular votes, but back in the days of
Rutherford B. Hayes there was no tele-
vision, nor were political columnists
around in abundance.
So, if the president wants to end this
war quickly and honorably, all he has
to do is form a committee of news peo-
ple and do what they tell him to do.
He could start with Broder and
Dionne. Then there’s always Peter
Jennings, Marianne Means, and George
Stephanopoulos.
If any of those people can’t make it,
he could use Walter Cronkite and Bill
Maher in a crunch.
Remember, this war is being fought
just for oil and to benefit rich
Americans.
HODGE
From 4A
his letter home- “Man borned of
woman and enlisted in Stonewall
Jackson's army is of few days and
short rations. We drew 12 goober pease
today. Sister I want you to send me a
box of proveshens.” :
Sometimes there was plenty to eat
after a raid as this soldier wrote home-
“I ran into a store, got ahold of a tin
wash tubb and drew it full of molasses.
got a box of good yankee crakers and
sat down on the ground and dipped
the crakers in the molasses and ate the
best meal i ever had. I had had only
two crakers to eat since Wdnesday and
this was Saturday.”
Privates often chafed under their
leaders as this Union soldier wrote-
“They get all the glory and most of the
pay and are mostly drunken rascals.
Some are white livered, tallow faced
skunks.”
War hardened men as this Federals
letter revealed- “The rebels was laying
all over the field of battle bloated up
big as a horse and black as the ase of
spades and the boys run over and
serch their pockets. I was goin through
a cornfield and run across a grayback
(reb) I stopped to see what he had but
somboddy had bin there first and I
went on my way rejoicing he was
dead.”
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Medical science was lacking in 1862
as this sick soldier wrote home- “I
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killer and whiskey and my head feels
rather large and rings like a kettle. I
mixed the quinine and the whiskey
and a more villanous compound never
passed a man’s lips.”
Reading these letters it’s hard to miss
the feelings they must have evoked in
the folks back home. Feelings that the
timeless art of leter writing can still
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Page 5A
ANDIE BRYMER / HERALD
Leslie Cobb of the Cleveland United Way receives a
check from Bethware Elementary students Malik Mathis,
Zack Keen, Emily Wilson, Paisley Williams and Alex
Mooneyham as principal Valerie Boyd looks on.
Intermediate School raised
$1,894; Grover Elementary,
$1,020. Kings Mountain
Middle School, $760; East
Elementary, $600; North
Elementary, $540; Kings
said the penny drive rein-
forces the character educa-
tion program. Character
traits during the drive were
responsibility and respect.
“Our character education
program is definitely work-
$342; Davidson, $77. ing.”
Mary Accor, director of CCB and First National
administrative services for banks helped count the pen-
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